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Dockman 02-13-2013 06:17 PM

Another shot at brisket
 
1 Attachment(s)
Time to try a brisket on the MES 40! Going to marinade it for 24-36 hours with coke, bbq sauce, and make some A1 or woshershire. Then for rub I plan to use salt, pepper, and steak rub! Going to smoke with cherry for 12 at 200-225 or how ever long it takes.

landarc 02-13-2013 06:33 PM

Nice hunk of meat, you sure are going fancy with that marinade. Best of luck, I am gonna bet longer than 12 hours at those temps.

Dockman 02-13-2013 06:40 PM

Yes it may take longer but I have plenty of time. Also plan to wrap at 165 IT.

NickyG 02-13-2013 06:41 PM

Where did you get it from?

Pitmaster T 02-13-2013 06:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dockman (Post 2366742)
Time to try a brisket on the MES 40! Going to marinade it for 24-36 hours with coke, bbq sauce, and make some A1 or woshershire. Then for rub I plan to use salt, pepper, and steak rub! Going to smoke with cherry for 12 at 200-225 or how ever long it takes.

Please try your plan on a select cut.

Bludawg 02-13-2013 07:08 PM

I wish you luck:tape:

Woody1911a1 02-13-2013 07:12 PM

guess you didn't watch the Mythbusters when they marinated a steak in coke over night ?

landarc 02-13-2013 07:21 PM

Dockman, in case your wondering about the above comments, and since you siggy says still trying, I am gonna step across the line a let you know...

1. There are many of us who are concerned that people learning how to do brisket cooks successfully add to much to the process too soon, complicating the process and making success much harder to gain.

2. You are adding a lot of sugar to the surface of the meat with a soda pop marinade, this is going to cause over-darkening, if not downright burning of the meat. Often with a brisket, you will end up with a very hard bark as a result of too much sugar added.

3. Beyond just the time, cooking below 225F often leads to drying of the surface of the meat and to a hard and dry surface to the meat. Even though you can still end up with meat that is tender, it is often dry to the mouth. Some of us feel that going hotter aids in learning a successful cook.

4. Now why then, do we hear of other cooks saying such low temps and long cooks, there are two reasons, one if that they are cooking a lot of meat in big cookers, that just have a different way of cooking. Others are using a type of cooker, be it a water smoker or gas cooker, that has a moist air characteristic.

Still, it's your meat and I wish you luck with your cook. Your plan could work just fine. Be patient and make sure you get it cooked until tender to a probe.

Woody1911a1 02-13-2013 07:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Woody1911a1 (Post 2366808)
guess you didn't watch the Mythbusters when they marinated a steak in coke over night ?

the coke turned the rib-eye to a dark mush .

Dockman 02-13-2013 07:38 PM

Thank you for clearing up all the comments. Would love to try a easy marinate so any suggestions would be great.
Quote:

Originally Posted by landarc (Post 2366816)
Dockman, in case your wondering about the above comments, and since you siggy says still trying, I am gonna step across the line a let you know...

1. There are many of us who are concerned that people learning how to do brisket cooks successfully add to much to the process too soon, complicating the process and making success much harder to gain.

2. You are adding a lot of sugar to the surface of the meat with a soda pop marinade, this is going to cause over-darkening, if not downright burning of the meat. Often with a brisket, you will end up with a very hard bark as a result of too much sugar added.

3. Beyond just the time, cooking below 225F often leads to drying of the surface of the meat and to a hard and dry surface to the meat. Even though you can still end up with meat that is tender, it is often dry to the mouth. Some of us feel that going hotter aids in learning a successful cook.

4. Now why then, do we hear of other cooks saying such low temps and long cooks, there are two reasons, one if that they are cooking a lot of meat in big cookers, that just have a different way of cooking. Others are using a type of cooker, be it a water smoker or gas cooker, that has a moist air characteristic.

Still, it's your meat and I wish you luck with your cook. Your plan could work just fine. Be patient and make sure you get it cooked until tender to a probe.


gettinbasted 02-13-2013 07:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dockman (Post 2366839)
Thank you for clearing up all the comments. Would love to try a easy marinate so any suggestions would be great.

That prime hunk of beef doesn't need a marinade. Season it and toss it on.

Bludawg 02-13-2013 07:57 PM

Marinate it in Oak Smoke at 300 until probe tender.

Bludawg 02-13-2013 07:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by landarc (Post 2366816)
Dockman, in case your wondering about the above comments, and since you siggy says still trying, I am gonna step across the line a let you know...

1. There are many of us who are concerned that people learning how to do brisket cooks successfully add to much to the process too soon, complicating the process and making success much harder to gain.

2. You are adding a lot of sugar to the surface of the meat with a soda pop marinade, this is going to cause over-darkening, if not downright burning of the meat. Often with a brisket, you will end up with a very hard bark as a result of too much sugar added.

3. Beyond just the time, cooking below 225F often leads to drying of the surface of the meat and to a hard and dry surface to the meat. Even though you can still end up with meat that is tender, it is often dry to the mouth. Some of us feel that going hotter aids in learning a successful cook.

4. Now why then, do we hear of other cooks saying such low temps and long cooks, there are two reasons, one if that they are cooking a lot of meat in big cookers, that just have a different way of cooking. Others are using a type of cooker, be it a water smoker or gas cooker, that has a moist air characteristic.

Still, it's your meat and I wish you luck with your cook. Your plan could work just fine. Be patient and make sure you get it cooked until tender to a probe.

You need a State Dept job:wink:

code3rrt 02-13-2013 08:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gettinbasted (Post 2366846)
That prime hunk of beef doesn't need a marinade. Season it and toss it on.

Yeppers! just go simple with either a favorite rub, or simpler yet, salt, pepper, granulated onion and granulated garlic.

In any case, enjoy!

KC

HeSmellsLikeSmoke 02-13-2013 08:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bludawg (Post 2366873)
You need a State Dept job:wink:

I nominate Landarc for Secretary of 'Splaining Things.


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