The BBQ BRETHREN FORUMS.

The BBQ BRETHREN FORUMS. (http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/index.php)
-   Q-talk (http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/forumdisplay.php?f=5)
-   -   Reverse Sear Question (http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showthread.php?t=153666)

noquarter 02-11-2013 08:19 PM

Reverse Sear Question
 
Ok so I have read about reverse searing on here and I have a question...
When I do it, I put the meat on indirectly for the first part, with wood for smokey flavor, then get the grill really hot and finish the meat off on that.
Some people explain the opposite of this...
But from what I understand- meat only accepts smoke up to 140 degrees. And if that is so, wouldn't searing the meat first inhibit the smoke from the meat?

rubizuk 02-11-2013 08:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by noquarter (Post 2364271)
Ok so I have read about reverse searing on here and I have a question...
When I do it, I put the meat on indirectly for the first part, with wood for smokey flavor, then get the grill really hot and finish the meat off on that.
Some people explain the opposite of this...
But from what I understand- meat only accepts smoke up to 140 degrees. And if that is so, wouldn't searing the meat first inhibit the smoke from the meat?

Everyone has different tastes and expectations, cook two of the same meats, doing one each and then you will know which you like.

Moose 02-11-2013 08:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by noquarter (Post 2364271)
Ok so I have read about reverse searing on here and I have a question...
When I do it, I put the meat on indirectly for the first part, with wood for smokey flavor, then get the grill really hot and finish the meat off on that.
Some people explain the opposite of this...
But from what I understand- meat only accepts smoke up to 140 degrees. And if that is so, wouldn't searing the meat first inhibit the smoke from the meat?

You are correct - in order for the meat to absorb smoke, it needs to be raw, basically. That's why exposing meat to smoke during the indirect phase of the cook works so well.

If you like a smoky taste on your meat (as I do) then yes, you'll want to get the smoke in the beginning indirect phase. Doing it at the end won't make much of a difference, if at all.

I did a full tutorial on the Reverse Sear HERE.

HeSmellsLikeSmoke 02-11-2013 09:40 PM

140 degrees is when the smoke ring stops forming. Meat accepts smoke to a varying degree all the time it is exposed to it.

Moose 02-11-2013 09:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by HeSmellsLikeSmoke (Post 2364390)
140 degrees is when the smoke ring stops forming. Meat accepts smoke to a varying degree all the time it is exposed to it.

Yes, unless the meat has been seared and has a crust on it which is what the OP was asking about - at that point, smoke penetration is nominal at best.

martyleach 02-11-2013 10:01 PM

I prefer a reverse sear so that I can lightly smoke the meat up front and sear it at the end.

HeSmellsLikeSmoke 02-11-2013 10:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Moose (Post 2364403)
Yes, unless the meat has been seared and has a crust on it which is what the OP was asking about - at that point, smoke penetration is nominal at best.

You make a good point. I was responding only to the 140 degree is when meat stops accepting smoke part. Your comment is more comprehensive. I actually don't know how searing affects smoke penetration, but I suspect you are correct.

buccaneer 02-12-2013 07:25 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Moose (Post 2364403)
Yes, unless the meat has been seared and has a crust on it which is what the OP was asking about - at that point, smoke penetration is nominal at best.

What is the science behind this?
Why not?:confused:

noquarter 02-16-2013 01:42 PM

thanks for the replies... this confirms my suspicions!

Moose 02-16-2013 02:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by buccaneer (Post 2364598)
What is the science behind this?
Why not?:confused:

If you sear first, the crust creates a barrier that does not allow for further smoke penetration into the meat, although it will absorb smoke into the crust, which can create a pretty acrid taste if exposed to enough smoke for an extended period of time. I suspect the acrid taste is due to a concentrated amount of smoke molecules into a very small surface. Not tasty at all...


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:20 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise v2.6.0 Beta 4 (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
2003 -2012 BBQ-Brethren Inc. All rights reserved. All Content and Flaming Pig Logo are registered and protected under U.S and International Copyright and Trademarks. Content Within this Website Is Property of BBQ Brethren Inc. Reproduction or alteration is strictly prohibited.