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-   -   Wood chunks- sq inches to lbs conversion (http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showthread.php?t=152683)

Trumpstylz 01-29-2013 08:02 PM

Wood chunks- sq inches to lbs conversion
 
I know its not exact, but how much is 550 or 700 sq inches of wood chunks in lbs? 1/3 cubic foot?

Local prices

Doitbest- 9$ for 10lbs
hd/Lowes- 7$ for 5lbs of weber
16$ for 18 lbs of char broil brand
8$ for 700 cubic inches of stubbs hickory

Menard's "western" brand chunks

8$ for .32 cubic feet
5.50$ for 1/3 cubic feet
8$ for 550 cubic inches

Hard to compare the lot.

flyingbassman5 01-29-2013 08:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Trumpstylz (Post 2347083)
I know its not exact, but how much is 550 or 700 sq inches of wood chunks in lbs? 1/3 cubic foot?

Local prices

Doitbest- 9$ for 10lbs
hd/Lowes- 7$ for 5lbs of weber
16$ for 18 lbs of char broil brand
8$ for 700 sq inches of stubbs hickory

Menard's "western" brand chunks

8$ for .32 cubic feet
5.50$ for 1/3 cubic feet
8$ for 550 cubic inches

Hard to compare the lot.

That's a tough answer. My initial thought is that the end result would depend on the type of wood. Some are more dense than others resulting in more weight per cubic foot. A cubic foot of hickory which is very dense, might weigh more than a cubic foot of maple (not exact, just an example).

Probably doesn't help you at all but something to consider.

HankB 01-29-2013 09:34 PM

You're going to burn your brain out worrying about this! :twitch:

How much wood are you going to use for smoking anyway? We've had some hellacious storms this last summer. Grab a bow saw and jump in your car or truck the next time there's a big storm and drive around some tree lined area. Oak, and maple are easy to find. Hickory a little less common. There is also cherry and apple to be had. Or drive out to the local orchards and see if any have apple or any other fruit trimmings.

Or buy a bag of chunks at the most convenient location and use the time saved grilling and smoking.

My $0.02.

best,
hank

HeSmellsLikeSmoke 01-29-2013 09:43 PM

Too many variables. Wood type, moisture content and accuracy of their measurements make it impractical to calculate. They don't want you to know.

Trumpstylz 01-29-2013 09:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by HankB (Post 2347197)
Or buy a bag of chunks at the most convenient location and use the time saved grilling and smoking.

Most of the locations are convenient, or on the way to something else (like doitbest).

With my luck, using a saw to get fallen wood would probably turn out with me doing something stupid, like getting the wrong type. Plus, the winter has been pretty mild this year.

BevoBurn96 01-29-2013 10:29 PM

As an engineer, I cannot resist solving this problem: :crazy:

First, however, double check your units on the 700 sq in for the Stubbs hickory. This unit does not make sense as it is an area not a volume. :twitch: If this is a plank which is 1" thick then it can be turned into a volume and compared to the rest. If it is random chunks, then they need to get a new packaging consultant to mark their bags correctly. :tsk:

The quick conversion of cubic inches to cubic feet: take the cubic inches and divide by 1728.
The conversion of cubic feet to inches: take the cubic ft and multiply by 1728.

Flyingbassman is right that the weight to volume conversion will change based on the density of the wood you're comparing...and the underlying price per pound will also change with the wood type (apple wood is significantly more expensive than mesquite per pound). :bored: However, what you're looking for is a comparative basis not a lab analysis. I found a couple of bags of hickory online that had both the weight and volume printed on the bag (Western Hickory Chunks $8.95, 10lb, 1/3 cubic ft). Assuming all the brands you listed were all chunks of roughly the same size, then this can be used to compare the lot: 30 lb of hickory chunks = 1 cubic ft of hickory chunks :bow:

Doitbest- 9$ for 10lbs (570 in3 / 0.33 ft3) = $0.90/lb
hd/Lowes- 7$ for 5lbs of weber (285 in3 / 0.165 ft3) = $1.40/lb
16$ for 18 lbs of char broil brand (1026 in3 / 0.594 ft3) = $0.89/lb
8$ for 700 sq inches of stubbs hickory (assuming this is really 700 in3) = $0.59/lb

Menard's "western" brand chunks

8$ for .32 cubic feet (553 in3 / 10.7 lb) = $0.75/lb
5.50$ for 1/3 cubic feet (570 in3 / 10 lb) = $0.55/lb
8$ for 550 cubic inches (0.32 ft3 / 10.7 lb) = $0.75/lb

Trumpstylz 01-29-2013 11:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BevoBurn96 (Post 2347278)
First, however, double check your units on the 700 sq in for the Stubbs hickory. This unit does not make sense as it is an area not a volume. :twitch:

Whoops, i edited the thread to inclued cubic inches instead of square.

Trumpstylz 01-29-2013 11:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BevoBurn96 (Post 2347278)
As an engineer, I cannot resist solving this problem: :crazy:

First, however, double check your units on the 700 sq in for the Stubbs hickory. This unit does not make sense as it is an area not a volume. :twitch: If this is a plank which is 1" thick then it can be turned into a volume and compared to the rest. If it is random chunks, then they need to get a new packaging consultant to mark their bags correctly. :tsk:

The quick conversion of cubic inches to cubic feet: take the cubic inches and divide by 1728.
The conversion of cubic feet to inches: take the cubic ft and multiply by 1728.

Flyingbassman is right that the weight to volume conversion will change based on the density of the wood you're comparing...and the underlying price per pound will also change with the wood type (apple wood is significantly more expensive than mesquite per pound). :bored: However, what you're looking for is a comparative basis not a lab analysis. I found a couple of bags of hickory online that had both the weight and volume printed on the bag (Western Hickory Chunks $8.95, 10lb, 1/3 cubic ft). Assuming all the brands you listed were all chunks of roughly the same size, then this can be used to compare the lot: 30 lb of hickory chunks = 1 cubic ft of hickory chunks :bow:

Doitbest- 9$ for 10lbs (570 in3 / 0.33 ft3) = $0.90/lb
hd/Lowes- 7$ for 5lbs of weber (285 in3 / 0.165 ft3) = $1.40/lb
16$ for 18 lbs of char broil brand (1026 in3 / 0.594 ft3) = $0.89/lb
8$ for 700 sq inches of stubbs hickory (assuming this is really 700 in3) = $0.59/lb

Menard's "western" brand chunks

8$ for .32 cubic feet (553 in3 / 10.7 lb) = $0.75/lb
5.50$ for 1/3 cubic feet (570 in3 / 10 lb) = $0.55/lb
8$ for 550 cubic inches (0.32 ft3 / 10.7 lb) = $0.75/lb

That was amazing. Thanks!

caliking 01-30-2013 12:01 AM

Just goes to show that all of life's answers can be found by asking the Brethren!

BigBellyBBQ 01-30-2013 03:44 AM

sometimes the question make one wonder why the question...


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