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-   -   Moldy Wood (http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showthread.php?t=151059)

Gasket 01-07-2013 05:54 PM

Moldy Wood
 
I just picked up about a quarter cord of wood, some red oak, hickory, and pecan. My problem is that there is green mold over a good portion of the logs. Is this still safe to use? Is there a good way to remove it? Most of the bark has already been removed so the mold is on the wood itself. Any help is appreciated.

rgrizzle 01-07-2013 05:57 PM

Sounds like a lot of campfire wood to me. I wouldn't use it. Just my opinion. I would def. seperate the wood that does not have the mold on it from the wood that does, mold is growing on it beacuse of moisture.

Gnaws on Pigs 01-07-2013 05:59 PM

Fire is a wonderful cleanser and purifier.

Bartkowiakj 01-07-2013 06:16 PM

I wouldnt use it -- spreading bacteria can be dangerous if low and slow or even at regular temps.

Stevesonfire! 01-07-2013 06:35 PM

If mold is actively growing on the wood, it is not yet cured and needs to age further. Mold growing on fresh cut "green" wood is natural. As the wood cures it will subside and you can use it without worry.

Gasket 01-07-2013 06:43 PM

The Guy I bought it from ran an add saying "Gourmet specialty wood for meat smoking". "fully seasoned hard wood also for indoor fireplaces".

Brizz 01-07-2013 08:25 PM

If it's really moldy and water...logged then I would pitch it. If it just has some mold on it I would "preheat" (char) on top of a fire box or in a charcoal chimney, for splits I'd do it in the fire pit.

flyingbassman5 01-07-2013 11:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gasket (Post 2320677)
The Guy I bought it from ran an add saying "Gourmet specialty wood for meat smoking". "fully seasoned hard wood also for indoor fireplaces".

:pound:

LOL, sounds like the time I went and looked at a load of hickory. Guy said it was "seasoned" and would be great for BBQing. I took two looks at the pile and turned around and left. Half the pile wasn't even hickory and some pieces still had moisture oozing out from where it was cut (prolly 5 or 6 days before hand). He was basically trying to sucker someone in to buying a pile of crap wood.

cliffcarter 01-08-2013 06:12 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bartkowiakj (Post 2320622)
I wouldnt use it -- spreading bacteria can be dangerous if low and slow or even at regular temps.

Mold is fungus not bacteria. Dry the wood out and the mold will dry out too.

NRA4Life 01-08-2013 07:37 AM

If you like the flavor that burnt mold introduces to your meat, then you should use it. Me personally, I would only burn it in my fireplace or campfire.

CarolinaQue 01-08-2013 09:39 AM

I think that it depends on how moldy it is. If only a little, a preheat on top of the fire box will likey save it. If to thick or to much, it may be fire place wood only. Have any pics to give us a visual?


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