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Fmacdonell 12-03-2012 08:03 PM

First Brisket Dry
 
Tried my first brisket, 5# from the Butcher in a Weber Smoky Mountain and it turned out dry. I know this is art and science but there is a lot of conflicting information on the web. Next week-end is try #2 using a small five pound brisket, 225 degree fire, foil @ 160 degrees and pull off smoker at 185 and then rest in 150 degree oven. Should be around 7.5 hours. What am I missing? Thanks!

Bludawg 12-03-2012 08:20 PM

You asked so sit down strap in and take notes.
Packers are easier to cook and more forgiving than a flat
275 is the new 225 I actually shoot for 300 YMMV
Meat temp means nothing; Cows are like people no two are alike. When it probes like butta its done.http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/sh...d.php?t=148853

IamMadMan 12-03-2012 08:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bludawg (Post 2287906)
You asked so sit down strap in and take notes.
Packers are easier to cook and more forgiving than a flat
275 is the new 225 I actually shoot for 300 YMMV

Meat temp means nothing; Cows are like people no two are alike.
When it probes like butta its done.


^+1 Listen to "Bludawg" and take notes....

bigsapper 12-03-2012 09:23 PM

First response wins again.

centexsmoker 12-03-2012 09:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bludawg (Post 2287906)
You asked so sit down strap in and take notes.
Packers are easier to cook and more forgiving than a flat
275 is the new 225 I actually shoot for 300 YMMV
Meat temp means nothing; Cows are like people no two are alike. When it probes like butta its done.http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/sh...d.php?t=148853

^^^^^^^^^^again- dead on the money. If you want a dry brisket, choose a small flat and cook it for 2 hrs per lb at 225. It's a 100% guarantee you'll get one.

1st- buy a whole brisket if you can. If you cannot, buy a flat with the fat cap still on. cook it at 275-300 until a probe slides in and out very easily. 185 CAN be the number, but it rarely is. Start checking at 185 and expect it to go to 195-200 or even 205 before it gives up the ghost and is tender to the probe.

landarc 12-03-2012 10:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Fmacdonell (Post 2287892)
Tried my first brisket, 5# from the Butcher in a Weber Smoky Mountain and it turned out dry. I know this is art and science but there is a lot of conflicting information on the web. Next week-end is try #2 using a small five pound brisket, 225 degree fire, foil @ 160 degrees and pull off smoker at 185 and then rest in 150 degree oven. Should be around 7.5 hours. What am I missing? Thanks!

I agree with Bludawg. But...to make it easier and with some more information.

A packer has more fat and is a larger cut of meat, this makes it a little more forgiving to cook that a flat. The typical flat has all of the fat removed, this makes it harder to get a good product. Still, if all you have is a flat, that is what you have. You can get a decent product out of it, not as good as cooking the entire packer.

If you cook at 225F, you increase the time the brisket is exposed to heat, the surface will lose more moisture doing this. You will find that unless you are cooking a lot of meat, or are adding moisture to your pit, the lower temperature will result in a dryer product. Really consider 275F as a better temperature.

Do not worry about internal temperature, it is not the way to cook a brisket. Cook the flat until you get the color you want, or maybe a little lighter, than wrap in a foil or butcher paper wrap, since it is a flat, add some moisture, 1/4 cup beef stock or apple juice, then place on cooker. You are looking for an internal temperature of 190F before you check the meat.

Once you reach 190F, take a metal skewer or ice pick and stick the meat, through the foil or paper, if it goes into the meat with almost no resistance, then pull, wrap in towel and rest for at least one hour. Do not remove from foil or paper.

Ye Olde Party Palace 12-03-2012 10:20 PM

If you probe through the foil or paper, and it probes like butter; then pull it and wrap in another layer of foil. If you don't wrap in another layer of foil, then your towel will be saturated with all of your fine juices that should be reabsorbing into the brisket. :cry:

Fmacdonell 12-04-2012 06:12 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by landarc (Post 2288018)
I agree with Bludawg. But...to make it easier and with some more information.

A packer has more fat and is a larger cut of meat, this makes it a little more forgiving to cook that a flat. The typical flat has all of the fat removed, this makes it harder to get a good product. Still, if all you have is a flat, that is what you have. You can get a decent product out of it, not as good as cooking the entire packer.

If you cook at 225F, you increase the time the brisket is exposed to heat, the surface will lose more moisture doing this. You will find that unless you are cooking a lot of meat, or are adding moisture to your pit, the lower temperature will result in a dryer product. Really consider 275F as a better temperature.

Do not worry about internal temperature, it is not the way to cook a brisket. Cook the flat until you get the color you want, or maybe a little lighter, than wrap in a foil or butcher paper wrap, since it is a flat, add some moisture, 1/4 cup beef stock or apple juice, then place on cooker. You are looking for an internal temperature of 190F before you check the meat.

Once you reach 190F, take a metal skewer or ice pick and stick the meat, through the foil or paper, if it goes into the meat with almost no resistance, then pull, wrap in towel and rest for at least one hour. Do not remove from foil or paper.

Just what I was looking for......thanks very much!


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