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-   -   How long will brisket take on smoke (http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showthread.php?t=147918)

Jjcolo 11-16-2012 11:01 PM

How long will brisket take on smoke
 
How long will meat take on smoke? I've been working on brisket, cooking at 250 and I've heard that it won't take on additional smoke after 140 degrees, which (on average) is about 2 hours into the smoke. Can some of the professionals out there comment on your experience?

Icekub 11-17-2012 03:47 AM

That is what I have heard as well. When I T gets to 140, don't bother putting smoke wood in anymore. I believe it is pretty accurate.

HeSmellsLikeSmoke 11-17-2012 05:25 AM

I am not sure why this in in this competetion forum, but if you want a serious answer, the 140 threshold is when the smoke ring stops forming. A brisket will take on smoke to a diminishing degree well beyond that point

If you want smack, my brisket can take on smoke longer than your brisket can.:wink:

tjus77 11-17-2012 06:21 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by HeSmellsLikeSmoke (Post 2273874)
I am not sure why this in in this competetion forum, but if you want a serious answer, the 140 threshold is when the smoke ring stops forming. A brisket will take on smoke to a diminishing degree well beyond that point

If you want smack, my brisket can take on smoke longer than your brisket can.:wink:

I'm with you. Any meat will take on smoke as long as it is exposed to it, that is why you want a small clean fire. If you want proof, take 1/2 of your brisket after it is past 140 and smoke it with a big choked down fire (white smoke) and see if you don't taste the difference.

Also, when I worked for a BBQ restaurant, if we were late getting the meat out of the freezer, it went into the pit semi frozen. When we did this we had a more prominent smoke ring because it took longer to get up to 140. Smoke ring is a chemical reaction, not smoke absorption.

Big Mike 11-17-2012 06:21 AM

You will hear arguments both ways. My opinion is that it will take on smoke to some degree as long as you are adding it. However, after a certain point the flavor may get too strong. I like a bit more smoke flavor but some folks don't care for it.

Just BS 11-17-2012 07:23 AM

Oops - Double post.....

Just BS 11-17-2012 07:25 AM

How long @ 250?

That depends. Are you cooking a whole brisket? Is it 12 Lbs or 18? Are you gonna wrap it? Inject it?

Its done when its done - when your temp probe goes into it like it was soft butter. Approx 205-215 degrees. YMMV

jasonjax 11-17-2012 08:25 AM

I speak from experience in saying meat will always take on smoke.

I cooked a pork shoulder once exclusively with wood chunks after I ran out of charcoal which was beyond the stall point, and it was so smoky it was almost inedible for my palate.

Badgeman 11-17-2012 08:30 AM

I usually add smoke right up til 165 when I wrap. But that's on my CTO. If I'm using an offset, I switch exclusively to coal at about 150 as I've found the smoke gets too heavy, especially if I don't wrap through the stall.

Bbq Bubba 11-17-2012 09:16 AM

1 Attachment(s)
15 hrs over Hickory fire. NOT oversmoked. :cool:

jasonjax 11-17-2012 11:59 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bbq Bubba (Post 2273954)
15 hrs over Hickory fire. NOT oversmoked. :cool:


I think cookers designed to use wood make a big difference. When I used chunk after chunk of hickory in my WSM ontop of the charcoal to keep adding fuel it smoked way too much.

42BBQ 11-17-2012 12:18 PM

When my Stickburning fire is perfect, the smoke is nearly invisible at the stack. I could throw anything in there, until it's done, and it won't be oversmoked.

jasonjax 11-17-2012 12:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 42BBQ (Post 2274056)
When my Stickburning fire is perfect, the smoke is nearly invisible at the stack. I could throw anything in there, until it's done, and it won't be oversmoked.


Yup ... as opposed to some smoker where adding chunks produces billowing smoke like I was trying to send signals or something. :-o

Southstar Jeff 11-17-2012 12:29 PM

I've been a BGE user, but since I got my OK Joes offset, I can taste the difference. I think the "over smoked" meat off many smokers is because of the incomplete combustion you get when you are controlling the fire with airflow. I think I'm done with smoking on the egg, there is just no way to keep the smoke sweet clear blue, it's not burning clean.

And I do agree, the meat will take smoke as long as there is smoke in there. The butcher paper method is a great way to have meat stop taking the smoke, if needed.

JazzyBadger 11-17-2012 12:31 PM

If you preheat the chunks it's a non issue.

When you add a bunch of cold wood into a hot fire, you're gonna billow out white smoke until those chunks start burning clean. Voila, no more "oversmoking."


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