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-   -   Turbinado VS. Brown Sugar (http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showthread.php?t=101594)

JONESY 03-01-2011 07:51 AM

Turbinado VS. Brown Sugar
 
So about a year and a half ago, I started using Turbinado sugar instead of brown sugar in all my rubs. I think it has a higher melting point and wonít caramelize as easily as brown sugar, but other than that I canít remember why I made the switch. In all actuality, Iím not sure it has mad my rubs any better or worse for that matter, but I wonder if Iím missing some flavor from the brown sugar.

I would love to know what you guys are using, any input would be great.

spicewine 03-01-2011 07:59 AM

Turbinado very slow to break down. Better for long cook meats. Not so good for short cook meats. It does create a real nice bark when allowed to properly set up. I don't use it in my rubs, rather I apply it after the rub is applied.

Q-Dat 03-01-2011 08:00 AM

I think you lose a little of the molasses that brown sugar has, but its not a huge difference. If you cook hotter I would stick with Turbinado.

big brother smoke 03-01-2011 08:28 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by spicewine (Post 1564256)
Turbinado very slow to break down. Better for long cook meats. Not so good for short cook meats. It does create a real nice bark when allowed to properly set up. I don't use it in my rubs, rather I apply it after the rub is applied.

Quite true :thumb:

Big Mike's BBQ 03-01-2011 08:47 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by spicewine (Post 1564256)
Turbinado very slow to break down. Better for long cook meats. Not so good for short cook meats. It does create a real nice bark when allowed to properly set up. I don't use it in my rubs, rather I apply it after the rub is applied.

Just curious about what you define as short cook meats and long cook meats. I know brisket and butts are long cook meats, but what about ribs? I would not use turbinado sugar on chicken, but I am thinking about using it on ribs is why I am asking.

Big Mike

Wampus 03-01-2011 09:45 AM

As far as I know, brown sugar is basically only sugar with molasses, so you're really only "missing" out on the molasses flavor. However, raw sugar is inrefined and does have a little different flavor.

I do know it won't burn as quickly as brown sugar, so if you're doing a higher heat cook, that's when I'd go with raw sugar over brown sugar.

At least that's how I see it.:becky:

El Lobo 03-01-2011 10:25 AM

The only thing I'd miss is the deep color of dark brown sugar versus turbinado.

Bamabuzzard 03-01-2011 11:20 AM

I started mixing brown sugar and turbinado in my rub together and have been more than pleased with the results. I smoke my ribs at temps ranging from 240-250 degrees for 4 1/2 to 4 3/4 hours.

I was getting frustrated because parts of my brown sugar seemed to be burning yet my ribs weren't as tender as I'd liked them. So after reading on this board that turbinado sugar had a higher burn point I started mixing in a cup of it in my regular rub recipe and haven't had the problem since.

It seems the turbinado sugar "protects" the brown sugar from burning. The turbinado sugar is larger in "grain size". I like the crust I get from the combination as well.

noe.a.gonzalez 03-01-2011 01:13 PM

Learn something new everyday. I was using turbinado sugar only because it didn't lump up and was in a lot of recipes I saw online.

spicewine 03-01-2011 02:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Big Mike's BBQ (Post 1564301)
Just curious about what you define as short cook meats and long cook meats. I know brisket and butts are long cook meats, but what about ribs? I would not use turbinado sugar on chicken, but I am thinking about using it on ribs is why I am asking.

Big Mike

I was refering to ribs as a short cook meat. I would reccomend brown sugar and not Turbinado on ribs. If you do use turbinado on ribs, you might find that when the ribs are done, the turbinado is still in a chrystaline state. Not really good to bite into IMHO.

wormdrink67 03-01-2011 02:33 PM

I have a tendency to use a lot of smoked paprika in the rub on my ribs, when combined with the brown sugar, they have been turning out a little too dark, would the turbinado help lighten the color? Assuming I can get it to set....

El Ropo 03-01-2011 06:05 PM

I use turbinado sugar in my rubs a lot, and always grind it down in my spare coffee grinder (at its coarsest setting). The past few rubs I've made through the coffee grinder have been finger lickin good IMO. Many others who tasted the end result agreed.

I prefer to get all ingredients in the rub about the same size, so they stick to the meat better, and form a nice crust earlier in the cooking process (hopefully).

Alan in Ga 03-01-2011 07:48 PM

We mix the two in our rub also and dry the brown sugar with a short stint in the oven and we love the results

codger 03-01-2011 08:21 PM

Learning from this thread, thanks for the info.

drapersbbq 03-01-2011 08:31 PM

We use a blend of turbinado and brown sugar in our rub with the split between the two being about 65 percent turbinado. We also grind the turbinado in our rubs.


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