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-   -   Ugly Drum Smoker (https://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showthread.php?t=23436)

thirdeye 01-29-2007 08:46 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Smokin Gator
Alright brethren... I did my first cook on my newly built drum smoker this weekend. I did 2 racks of spares, a nearly 8 pound butt, and one fatty.

That all looks great! Full slabs were the first cook on my BDS as well. You gotta love that old time pit flavor!!

When I'm turning stuff on one grate only, the fire will settle right back down in a few minutes. When I am turning stuff or rotating both grates I do plug any open vents first to stop that heat surge.

swamprb 01-29-2007 10:48 AM

That's one thing I noticed, and glad you mentioned it, I'll try plugging the vent before I open the lid to turn anything. What about mopping the ribs? Will a mop tend to extinguish the coals?

thirdeye 01-29-2007 11:34 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by swamprb
That's one thing I noticed, and glad you mentioned it, I'll try plugging the vent before I open the lid to turn anything. What about mopping the ribs? Will a mop tend to extinguish the coals?

I'm an old baster and it has never bothered me, but I use lump instead of briquettes. I might get a small flash if the mop has a lot of oil in it but at those cooking distances, that is no problem. I really need a dedicated spray bottle to use.

Piedmont 01-29-2007 11:40 AM

Tough ribs next day?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by ThomEmery
Yea the Drum gives ya that turbo

Have any of you noticed the ribs being tougher the next day (that is, if you have left overs!) after cooking faster on the UDS??

Most of the Rib Joints in and around the Chicago area cook ribs and rib tips fast but if you have leftovers, the next day they are tough. That is the trade off of faster cooking from what I've observed. It would interesting to know about this method.

Smokin Gator 01-29-2007 12:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Piedmont
Have any of you noticed the ribs being tougher the next day (that is, if you have left overs!) after cooking faster on the UDS??

Most of the Rib Joints in and around the Chicago area cook ribs and rib tips fast but if you have leftovers, the next day they are tough. That is the trade off of faster cooking from what I've observed. It would interesting to know about this method.


I'll let you know after tonight about the ribs as we are having leftover ribs and pulled pork.

I just had a sammie for lunch from the butt. It was farkin good!!! Several of my coworkers had a sammie as well and 2 of them said it was the best pulled pork they had ever had. That is some high priase in this neck of the woods!!! Made me dang proud.

thirdeye 01-29-2007 12:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Piedmont
Have any of you noticed the ribs being tougher the next day (that is, if you have left overs!) after cooking faster on the UDS??

Most of the Rib Joints in and around the Chicago area cook ribs and rib tips fast but if you have leftovers, the next day they are tough. That is the trade off of faster cooking from what I've observed. It would interesting to know about this method.

Never noticed any toughness issues and since my drum has so much more room than my Eggs, I usually cook extra so I'll have some to freeze. If I load both grates I can really cook some weight.

To offset the 20 to 30% faster cook times on things like ribs, chicken or prime rib, just go with a lower temp than you usually use. I was warned and it still took awhile for me to get used to it. I almost overdid the two tri-tips in this picture. I didn't stick them until the third flip and when I did they were 115. The thermometer saved, them and me. I still like cooking butts or briskets in 10 hours so I stay with my usual cook temps on them.

PS .. Keep your eye on fatties, at about 230 pit temp, they will be done in 2 hours instead of 3. You have to turn them sooner too or they can get too dark.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v3...S/1e5e9e1e.jpg

Blutch 01-29-2007 01:43 PM

I'm sure this is a stupid newbie question, but what causes the faster cook times if the internal temp is the same? Is it the direct heat?

Is it the same with the Weber bullet smoker thing with the water pan? Is the taste and texture that much different with the water pan?

B

thirdeye 01-29-2007 01:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Blutch
I'm sure this is a stupid newbie question, but what causes the faster cook times if the internal temp is the same? Is it the direct heat?

Is it the same with the Weber bullet smoker thing with the water pan? Is the taste and texture that much different with the water pan?

B

Yes, the direct radiant heat is responsible for the faster cook times in a drum. You have greater distance from the coals to the grate than in a WSM. I don't own a WSM, and have only cooked on one a few times as a helper but in those style of cookers, water pans act as a heat buffer. There are lively debates as to adding moisture as well. The guy I cooked with used sand in his water pan.

Bigmista 01-29-2007 02:16 PM

I also think there is a convection effect in the barrel and the heated air swirls around the meat as well as the direct heat from the bottom. Just a theory though.

Smokin Gator 01-29-2007 03:58 PM

Today I wrote up a materials list and directions in Word for how I built my first UDS. By no means is it supposed to be any better than anyone elses... it is just how mine turned out. As almost everyone had said... I will make a few changes next time!!

If you would like to have a copy I will glady give you one... Just email me.

swamprb 01-30-2007 06:27 AM

Thirdeye- On an average cook using one grate do you cook closer to the coals or at the highest level? The thing I've got to get used to is flipping the meats. I took some leftover spares and added a little apple juice and foiled them in the oven and I think they tasted better than off the grill. Took some to work and nuked em' and they tasted like death warmed over!
I think next cook I'll start the ribs in a rack first

thirdeye 01-30-2007 06:51 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by swamprb
Thirdeye- On an average cook using one grate do you cook closer to the coals or at the highest level? The thing I've got to get used to is flipping the meats. I took some leftover spares and added a little apple juice and foiled them in the oven and I think they tasted better than off the grill. Took some to work and nuked em' and they tasted like death warmed over!
I think next cook I'll start the ribs in a rack first

With one grate I put it in the highest position. I have a 43" drum so my high grate is like 30" from the coals. Yep, turning the meats took me some time to get used to as well....

ThomEmery 01-30-2007 08:17 AM

And be quick about that flippin or zoom goes the temp

swamprb 01-30-2007 08:32 AM

Thats the thing, I had to wait for the smoke to clear, just to see where the meat was, and then bam! Temps up! I took a section of a drum I cut up and slid it into the first cooker I built and it was 43" and I kept thinking if was cooking on it I'd need a step ladder and a miners headlamp just to peer into it!

motley que 01-30-2007 08:33 AM

for a butt or brisket, how often do you flip?


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