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-   -   Pellet smoker 'General' guidelines ?? (https://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showthread.php?t=21645)

Q_Egg 11-04-2006 09:14 AM

Pellet smoker 'General' guidelines ??
 
... some helpful Brethren made some interesting posts on my initial Thread re. a recent Traeger Texas Style 075 purchase. As I try to come up to speed with the nuances of pellet burners, I hope there are some Brethren guidelines that can help me find the 'sweet spot' approach that makes the most of what these cookers can do. Clearly, I'm referring to 'non-smoke' type cooks like chicken , large pieces of fish, turkey or turkey breasts, ....

One comment I noted was start in the 'Smoke' or 180*F mode for the first 30 minutes or so and then crank up the temp to the appropriate range for the product. Did I get this right ?? ... and ... are there some other gems of wisdom to put out such great Q that wifey stops asking "why did we need another cooker" .....

I truly feel this is a great complement to the BGE and there's is not much I should'nt be able to smoke or cook proficiently with some time and expereince under my belt.

Any good thoughts from you capable pellet professionals ??


Q_Egg 11-04-2006 04:54 PM

.... must have been a butt _ignorant question. Sorry guys!

SmokeInDaEye 11-04-2006 05:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Q_Egg
.... must have been a butt _ignorant question. Sorry guys!

Not at all Q Traeg. I personally have never used a pellet cooker so am of zero help but it sounds great! As for the wife, just expain that this one practically cooks the meat itself, allow more time with her.:twisted:

Plowboy 11-04-2006 05:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Q_Egg
... some helpful Brethren made some interesting posts on my initial Thread re. a recent Traeger Texas Style 075 purchase. As I try to come up to speed with the nuances of pellet burners, I hope there are some Brethren guidelines that can help me find the 'sweet spot' approach that makes the most of what these cookers can do. Clearly, I'm referring to 'non-smoke' type cooks like chicken , large pieces of fish, turkey or turkey breasts, ....

One comment I noted was start in the 'Smoke' or 180*F mode for the first 30 minutes or so and then crank up the temp to the appropriate range for the product. Did I get this right ?? ... and ... are there some other gems of wisdom to put out such great Q that wifey stops asking "why did we need another cooker" .....

I truly feel this is a great complement to the BGE and there's is not much I should'nt be able to smoke or cook proficiently with some time and expereince under my belt.

Any good thoughts from you capable pellet professionals ??


Guys that use pellets for comp will use a pellet mix. Everyone has their own mix that they like, but it usually involves about 50% oak because its cheap. The other 50% is equally split between hickory and fruit wood.

I have yet to get a distinct difference in smoke flavor or color from different flavors of pellets. Pellets do a great job of giving smoke flavor, color, and smoke ring. The flavor differences seem more subtle than real wood... at least for me.

BTW, we call them Tree Turds.

Plowboy 11-04-2006 05:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SmokeInDaEye
As for the wife, just expain that this one practically cooks the meat itself, allow more time with her.:twisted:

That's good!

I'd love to have an Egg for the occasional need to play with fire. They seem awesome. If I can ever find a used Kamado, I'd have to pick it up. Been looking.

kcpellethead 11-04-2006 05:14 PM

Well, I complete so much cooking with pellets, I don't often cook other things (no time). I cook with two FE-100's. They are different than the 075. The 075 will work well for long cooks and short cooks. It will not get up to 450 - 500 degrees. It will cook at 350 easily. It will cook lower even easier.

I don't know which controller you have on your unit, but on mine I don't need to start on the 180 or Smoke setting. I have a 225 setting and use it a lot. Your fuel use will be moderate because the pit is not insulated.

Keep your unit clean & dry and you'll have many happy cooks with it. I don't know what else to tell you. Ask more specific questions when you think of them and we'll do our best to answer.

Rod

Plowboy 11-04-2006 05:36 PM

Rod - What's your take on different pellet flavors?

Wife and I are enjoying some Iowa chops and crab stuffed fungus. The 075 is a pork chop cooking fool! Great combination of smoke and sear. Smells great and is very juicy. Started at 180 for 30 minutes and then cranked to 325 for about another 45-60 min. They temp'ed at 165, which is probably a little hotter than I would have liked them still on the grill.

Q_Egg 11-04-2006 05:49 PM

.... OK, .... now I have a few 'nuggets'. Mixing pellets, tree turds, 225*F for many cooks, won't likely do the 450*-500*F stuff so will use the BGE for those. We love pork chops so that formula is a keeper.

Thanks gentlemen .... three large chicken breasts are almost ready ... 325*F for just over 1 hour and looking/smelling awesome (ly) ?? I appreciate the help.

Happy Saturday Night!

Kevin 11-04-2006 05:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Q_Egg
.... OK, .... now I have a few 'nuggets'. Mixing pellets, tree turds, 225*F for many cooks, won't likely do the 450*-500*F stuff so will use the BGE for those. We love pork chops so that formula is a keeper.

Thanks gentlemen .... three large chicken breasts are almost ready ... 325*F for just over 1 hour and looking/smelling awesome (ly) ?? I appreciate the help.

Happy Saturday Night!

Q_Egg, you are so polite! Rod (kc_pellethead) knows his stuff. I'm just glad to be along for the ride.

Q_Egg 11-04-2006 07:31 PM

... actually a sarcastic s_b, but trying to follow excellent examples (present company included) .....

Dang , that chicken is good!

Sawdustguy 11-04-2006 08:50 PM

Q_egg,

This is one cooker than you do not want to get wet. If you do not do it already, keep it in the gararge when not in use.

Q_Egg 11-04-2006 08:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sawdustguy
Q_egg,

This is one cooker than you do not want to get wet. If you do not do it already, keep it in the gararge when not in use.

----------------------------------------
... got the message ! Fortunately we stay very dry much of the year, but will want to plan ahead when our few 'monsoon' times come around. I'm already looking for sealed containers for the 'tree turds'.

A few years in No. Andover, MA taught me what Summer hum_dity is all about.

Regards,

Plowboy 11-04-2006 09:17 PM

A couple other tips...

May seem common sense to many, but it wasn't to me. Start your cooker on High or a high temp on your dial. This keeps the pellets feeding at a good rate until you get a good flame established. About 5 minutes and I find that my pit is up to 200 degrees pretty easily. Then back down to whatever temp you want to cook at. When I first started, I'd start my cooker on smoke or 180. This didn't feed the pellets in fast enough and I sometimes wouldn't get a good fire established before my hot rod shut down.

At some point this will happen to you. Your fire may go out. Either you are going to run out of pellets or you don't get a proper start. If you refill the pellet bin and don't turn your cooker off and back on, the hot rod isn't going to restart your fire. No matter how your fire goes out, make sure you look at the little fire ring in your pit to make sure that unlit pellets haven't mounded up in your pit. If they have and you restart, you could be burning a ton of pellets at one time and have a real problem on your hands.

So the tip is to look for mounded pellets if your fire ever goes out.

Plowboy 11-04-2006 09:22 PM

If you use a pellet pit for comp, you may want to carry a spare controller with you. Almost all of the pellet teams that we've talked to have spare controllers with them. We learned the hard way at a contest here in Blue Springs, MO this year. Two hours before turn in, the controller on our big cooker went out. We had no spare and had to hard wire the auger and hand feed pellets for 3-4 hours.

Q_Egg 11-04-2006 09:25 PM

Good tip! .. lots to learn. Tonight I was watching everything pretty close and saw the digital temp gauge drop down to 310* when I had it set to 325*. Opened the bin and pellets (sorry, tt's) were down low ... some up on sides but almost gone in center. Quickly dumped in more and away it went. This 'mounding' tip is great.

Thanks.

SloppyQ 11-04-2006 09:26 PM

What mixture of tree turds have you been using Todd?

Q_Egg 11-04-2006 09:35 PM

... slightly weird question ..... can you tell which tt's are in the bin if you don't know what went in? ( assuming it's only one type ...not a mix). I have not tried to smell them closely to try to tell. There was about 2/3 bin full when I brought 075 home and I wasn't sure what they were. I might forget between cooks ... maybe it's a good idea to scoop out most of any remaining tt's and put them back in the bag?

Plowboy 11-04-2006 09:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SloppyQ
What mixture of tree turds have you been using Todd?

For comp, catering, and concessions we've been using straight oak. Oak turds are the cheapest. Not until I got my 075 a couple weeks ago have we even had any other flavored pellets to work with. I have a bag of apple and a bag of hickory. Still experimenting. I can't tell a whole lot of difference from the oak to the hickory and apple. Looking forward to trying some Cherry. When using real wood, I love a little cherry with hickory. Mostly, I like the color that cherry wood gives. Want to see if Tree Turds will give the same color.

One long time, successful pellet team (Not Pellet Envy :wink:) shared with us that they use like a blend of oak, hickory, and apple. I think about 20% each for hickory and apple.

I think a blend is the way to go and am planning to fnd that blend this winter. Tonight, I used about 80% apple and 20% hickory blend on our pork chops. Wife was in heaven. Said it was the best chops she's ever had. I'd have to agree. I simple rubbed a little EVOO, Traeger Pork & Poultry Shake (came in the Traeger spice sampler), fresh ground pepper, and a little kosher salt. Smoked for 30 min and then kicked it up for about 45-60 more. Nice color. Nice flavor. Real juicy. Smoke smell and a little bitty smoke ring. Perfect.

Plowboy 11-04-2006 09:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Q_Egg
... slightly weird question ..... can you tell which tt's are in the bin if you don't know what went in? ( assuming it's only one type ...not a mix). I have not tried to smell them closely to try to tell. There was about 2/3 bin full when I brought 075 home and I wasn't sure what they were. I might forget between cooks ... maybe it's a good idea to scoop out most of any remaining tt's and put them back in the bag?

Generally, I can't. My oak pellets are from a different maker. They are longer in size than my apple and hickory. So I can generally see the oak from the size, but I think that's because of the two different brands. The apple and hickory look the same. They don't smell to me. Just like two pieces of wood generally won't smell different until you burn them... at least to me.

Slightly off topic, I do a lot of woodworking and have worked with Zebrawood, an African exotic wood. The saw dust smells like manure. Very distinct and stinky.

SloppyQ 11-04-2006 10:10 PM

First time out I used pecan and apple mix 50/50 on 1" thick pork chops, worked out fantastic, smooth flavor. Need to get some oak to mix in so I don't waste my fruit turds (sounds funny), what brand of oak are you using Todd?

Plowboy 11-04-2006 10:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SloppyQ
First time out I used pecan and apple mix 50/50 on 1" thick pork chops, worked out fantastic, smooth flavor. Need to get some oak to mix in so I don't waste my fruit turds (sounds funny), what brand of oak are you using Todd?

Pecan is on my list to try for sure. The Oak that I have is OHP - Ozark Hardwood Products.

Plowboy 11-04-2006 10:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SloppyQ
First time out I used pecan and apple mix 50/50 on 1" thick pork chops, worked out fantastic, smooth flavor. Need to get some oak to mix in so I don't waste my fruit turds (sounds funny), what brand of oak are you using Todd?

The best deal is to buy an entire pallet. Of course, that's a lot of pellets. But if you go in on a group buy, then you save some $$.

Solidkick 11-05-2006 08:21 AM

Nice job guys.......very informative....and I'm sure the thread will continue to grow.....

Q_Egg 11-05-2006 08:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SloppyQ
First time out I used pecan and apple mix 50/50 on 1" thick pork chops, worked out fantastic, smooth flavor. Need to get some oak to mix in so I don't waste my fruit turds (sounds funny), what brand of oak are you using Todd?

.... raises an early question for me about starting with fruit (or a mix) and then switching to oak for the longer cook time. That means more 'manual intervention', but maybe it is worth it. May also depend on my access to Ozark Oak tt's. Looks like Wyoming is the closest source.

Plowboy 11-05-2006 12:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Q_Egg
.... raises an early question for me about starting with fruit (or a mix) and then switching to oak for the longer cook time. That means more 'manual intervention', but maybe it is worth it. May also depend on my access to Ozark Oak tt's. Looks like Wyoming is the closest source.

I don't have the timing down on how long a hopper full of turds will last. For long cooks on a 075, you are going to have to refill at some point. Start with the fruit, hickory, and pecan turds then top it off with Oak on the back end of your long cook.

I'm cooking some thighs for lunch and a pork butt for the teachers at my sons' school. They go to an English-Spanish speaking preschool. I'm trading some BBQ for tamales. :tongue: I've loaded it up with 50% apple and 50% hickory. Once my hopper drops down toward the bottom, I'll start putting Oak in to finish the pork butt.

I took some pictures of my pellets both seperate and mixed. You'll see that you can only tell a difference in the oak... a different vendor. I'll post in a bit.

SloppyQ 11-05-2006 12:18 PM

Q you can get them from Traeger also. They suggest you use theirs anyway.

Plowboy 11-05-2006 12:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Q_Egg
Looks like Wyoming is the closest source.

Why not sign up as an OHP distributor? If you have the space, you could buy a partial pallet and share or sell with others in your area.

DeanC 11-05-2006 12:55 PM

I have been using Branch Creek pellets, the hickory and cherry blend, and love them.

Wine & Swine 11-05-2006 01:06 PM

Great thread guys, I am learning alot. Thanks.

kcpellethead 11-05-2006 09:51 PM

Wow . . .glad to see there is so much talk about pellets and pellet cookers. I have not read the entire thread, but I will tomorrow. To answer the questions about pellet blends and types of wood. I started out using a Pennington pellet that Fast Eddy sells. They are 60% hickory, 40% oak. Since, I've tried just about everything under the sun. Blends, straight fruit woods, Osage Orange (hedge), you name it. I always go back to that original blend for two reasons. One, you need a wood with high btu output. Oak is excellent for that. Hickory is pretty good too. When I cook with 100% fruit wood, my cooker burned significantly more fuel without noticeable different in taste. Which is my second reason. Pellet cookers burn fuel more efficiently than most other pits. So, the different woods just don't change my flavors enough to warrant cooking with them. In fact, they pretty much smell the same. So, dance with the one that brung you, and for me, it's that original 60% hickory, 40% oak blend. Plus, they're cheap!

Good question Todd. Hope this helps answer it.

Rod

Plowboy 11-05-2006 11:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kcpellethead
Wow . . .glad to see there is so much talk about pellets and pellet cookers. I have not read the entire thread, but I will tomorrow. To answer the questions about pellet blends and types of wood. I started out using a Pennington pellet that Fast Eddy sells. They are 60% hickory, 40% oak. Since, I've tried just about everything under the sun. Blends, straight fruit woods, Osage Orange (hedge), you name it. I always go back to that original blend for two reasons. One, you need a wood with high btu output. Oak is excellent for that. Hickory is pretty good too. When I cook with 100% fruit wood, my cooker burned significantly more fuel without noticeable different in taste. Which is my second reason. Pellet cookers burn fuel more efficiently than most other pits. So, the different woods just don't change my flavors enough to warrant cooking with them. In fact, they pretty much smell the same. So, dance with the one that brung you, and for me, it's that original 60% hickory, 40% oak blend. Plus, they're cheap!

Good question Todd. Hope this helps answer it.

Rod

That pretty well represents what we've heard from long time pellet cooks: fruit turds just don't change the flavor much.

Rod, do you notice a flavor difference between straight hickory and straight oak? I'm just getting into different pellets, but I can't tell a difference... or it is really subtle at best.

Thanks, Todd.

kcpellethead 11-06-2006 08:39 AM

Todd,

I can't recall if I've cooked with straight hickory or not. If I did, the pellets came from Branch Creek. I've cooked with 100% apple, 100% cherry, and 100% pecan for sure. Oh, and Osage Orange. My meat was darker with the cherry, but the flavor change was so minor. Plus, it took a lot more pellets to achieve the same results.

You folks are mostly cooking with 075's, while I'm using FE-100's. I'd think there might even be a little difference in our cookers, but wouldn't know exactly what.

One thing about pellets, be careful about heating fuel pellets. They are very inexpensive but use a petroleum lubricant when extruded. Supposedly food safe pellets are extruded with vegetable based lubricants. It might all be bunk, but I can purchase my pellets cheap enough that it's not worth the risk of burning any petroleum products in my pit no matter how minor.

Some folks swear by different wood pellets. It's not that I don't believe they make a difference. However, for me, I just don't see enough of a difference to warranty the expense or effort of using those products.

I've now read this whole thread. Great discussion.

Rod

Q_Egg 11-06-2006 08:47 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kcpellethead
Wow . . .glad to see there is so much talk about pellets and pellet cookers. I have not read the entire thread, but I will tomorrow. To answer the questions about pellet blends and types of wood. I started out using a Pennington pellet that Fast Eddy sells. They are 60% hickory, 40% oak. Since, I've tried just about everything under the sun. Blends, straight fruit woods, Osage Orange (hedge), you name it. I always go back to that original blend for two reasons. One, you need a wood with high btu output. Oak is excellent for that. Hickory is pretty good too. When I cook with 100% fruit wood, my cooker burned significantly more fuel without noticeable different in taste. Which is my second reason. Pellet cookers burn fuel more efficiently than most other pits. So, the different woods just don't change my flavors enough to warrant cooking with them. In fact, they pretty much smell the same. So, dance with the one that brung you, and for me, it's that original 60% hickory, 40% oak blend. Plus, they're cheap!

Good question Todd. Hope this helps answer it.

Rod

------------------------------------------------------

This is exactly the type of Reply I was hoping for !! Man .... it saves so much time, money, and wasted effort repeating mixes that have already been tried. Some other Replies also gave another comment on this and will help me a bunch! Many thanks Brethren ........

Regards,

Plowboy 11-07-2006 06:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kcpellethead
Todd,

I can't recall if I've cooked with straight hickory or not. If I did, the pellets came from Branch Creek. I've cooked with 100% apple, 100% cherry, and 100% pecan for sure. Oh, and Osage Orange. My meat was darker with the cherry, but the flavor change was so minor. Plus, it took a lot more pellets to achieve the same results.

You folks are mostly cooking with 075's, while I'm using FE-100's. I'd think there might even be a little difference in our cookers, but wouldn't know exactly what.

One thing about pellets, be careful about heating fuel pellets. They are very inexpensive but use a petroleum lubricant when extruded. Supposedly food safe pellets are extruded with vegetable based lubricants. It might all be bunk, but I can purchase my pellets cheap enough that it's not worth the risk of burning any petroleum products in my pit no matter how minor.

Some folks swear by different wood pellets. It's not that I don't believe they make a difference. However, for me, I just don't see enough of a difference to warranty the expense or effort of using those products.

I've now read this whole thread. Great discussion.

Rod

Cool. We are hoping to sell our stick burner and invest in a FE-100 as well.

Plowboy 11-07-2006 06:40 PM

After Rod's post, I think I'll try a Cherry/Oak mix and see how I like that. I like the idea of the darker color, but 100% cherry sounds excessive.

kcpellethead 11-07-2006 08:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Plowboy
After Rod's post, I think I'll try a Cherry/Oak mix and see how I like that. I like the idea of the darker color, but 100% cherry sounds excessive.

That sounds like a pretty good idea. I'd say 2:1 oak to cherry or 1:1 maybe. Pellet cookers just burn their fuel so efficiently, it's hard to get distinct flavor differences from the different pellets in my opinion.

Rod

Solidkick 11-08-2006 12:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kcpellethead
That sounds like a pretty good idea. I'd say 2:1 oak to cherry or 1:1 maybe. Pellet cookers just burn their fuel so efficiently, it's hard to get distinct flavor differences from the different pellets in my opinion.

Rod

So let me ask this....if the difference in the make up of the pellets (hickory, oak etc...) isn't giving you distinct flavor differences, then are you saying that your winning ways are coming strictly from your rub and sauce combinations? I would think you'd have to have some flavor from the pellets, maybe not the fruit woods per sec, but the hickory, maple, etc....

kcpellethead 11-08-2006 01:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Solidkick
So let me ask this....if the difference in the make up of the pellets (hickory, oak etc...) isn't giving you distinct flavor differences, then are you saying that your winning ways are coming strictly from your rub and sauce combinations? I would think you'd have to have some flavor from the pellets, maybe not the fruit woods per sec, but the hickory, maple, etc....

Well, ummmmmmmm, I guess the short answer is "no." However there is way more to it. I think a combination of things, including luck, have contributed to our success this year. After all, no matter how well you cook, you still have to find four tables of six judge (five really) that like your product on that day.

Honestly, having your product perfectly cooked and not giving the judges something to ding you for, is probably what works best for us. Hopefully, nothing we do is offensive to a judge, whether that be smoke, spice, sauce, etc. When it comes to doneness, overs usually beat unders, but when it comes to seasoning, sauce and smoke, unders usually beat overs. If anything, no matter how hard you try, you won't over smoke your product with pellets. That eliminates one variable in the equation, allowing the cook to concentrate on other things.

I'm rambling here, but not on purpose. It's hard to get it all out in print this way. Hopefully I'm sort of clear. If not, ask questions.

Rod

P.S. - As I read this, I sort of confuse myself because I'm always trying to put myself in someone else's shoes. Someone might respond that we had some success with a stick burner this year as well. EVERY contest we cooked, somebody walked up to my pit on Saturday morning to comment that I wasn't cooking. Every one of them. It was a huge compliment to me each and every time. They couldn't see the smoke coming out of my stack. That's exactly how I want my pit to burn.

Q_Egg 11-08-2006 03:08 PM

This statement is one I can read over and over and smile each time!
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by kcpellethead
Well, ummmmmmmm, I guess the short answer is "no." However there is way more to it. I think a combination of things, including luck, have contributed to our success this year. After all, no matter how well you cook, you still have to find four tables of six judge (five really) that like your product on that day.

Honestly, having your product perfectly cooked and not giving the judges something to ding you for, is probably what works best for us. Hopefully, nothing we do is offensive to a judge, whether that be smoke, spice, sauce, etc. When it comes to doneness, overs usually beat unders, but when it comes to seasoning, sauce and smoke, unders usually beat overs. If anything, no matter how hard you try, you won't over smoke your product with pellets. That eliminates one variable in the equation, allowing the cook to concentrate on other things.

I'm rambling here, but not on purpose. It's hard to get it all out in print this way. Hopefully I'm sort of clear. If not, ask questions.

Rod

P.S. - As I read this, I sort of confuse myself because I'm always trying to put myself in someone else's shoes. Someone might respond that we had some success with a stick burner this year as well. EVERY contest we cooked, somebody walked up to my pit on Saturday morning to comment that I wasn't cooking. Every one of them. It was a huge compliment to me each and every time. They couldn't see the smoke coming out of my stack. That's exactly how I want my pit to burn.

-------------------------------------------------------

I acknowledge my relative newness to this enjoyable pursuit, but I work hard at it and take it very seriously. This post says far more than its words and it makes a strong impact. Maybe it's just me and my particular point in the learning curve, but I feel like printing it and putting it on the wall.

jpw23 11-08-2006 03:21 PM

Do these things use the same pellets as the pellet stoves? If so, there is a pellet stove dealer near my home....I could get you guys some prices.

Plowboy 11-08-2006 04:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jpw23
Do these things use the same pellets as the pellet stoves? If so, there is a pellet stove dealer near my home....I could get you guys some prices.

Rod states in one of his earlier posts that the pellets for stoves may be different from those specific for smoking. Those for stoves may have a petrolium byproduct.

ThomEmery 11-08-2006 09:41 PM

My new FEC 100 will be here Friday.
I am ready to cook and sleep.
When we go to a contest I am a Zombie.
Being able to cook for friends and still enjoy
my weekends is going to be the best part.

Plowboy 11-09-2006 08:35 AM

3 Attachment(s)
Chicken and small butt pics from this last weekend.

Plowboy 11-09-2006 08:36 AM

http://ronzsmokinwood.com/catalog/in...e8a31c70550cc8

I clicked into this site from BBQ-Brethren.com. Does this seem like a good price for Traeger pellets or am I missing something?

Plowboy 11-09-2006 08:40 AM

1 Attachment(s)
Q_Egg,

I took some pics of my pellets to show that you can't tell a difference in them, except for the oak. The top left is Traeger apple. Top right is Traeger hickory. Bottom center is OHP oak. As you can see, the OHP oak pellets are larger, but I suspect that is a vendor difference. There is no difference in site or smell. You mix these together and you can't tell what's in the mix.

Q_Egg 11-09-2006 09:05 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Plowboy
http://ronzsmokinwood.com/catalog/in...e8a31c70550cc8

I clicked into this site from BBQ-Brethren.com. Does this seem like a good price for Traeger pellets or am I missing something?

Price looks good, but shipping kills me. Ends up at $20./20# bag and I pay <$15. locally including tax.

Your chicken looks great ... butts too.

Regards,

Plowboy 11-09-2006 09:18 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Q_Egg
Price looks good, but shipping kills me. Ends up at $20./20# bag and I pay <$15. locally including tax.

:lol: I never looked at shipping.

The_Kapn 11-09-2006 09:28 AM

You might take a look at Epp Farms out of Newton, KS
$17.50 for 20 lbs including shipping.

http://www.bbqwoodpellets.com/bbq_wood_pellet_cart.htm

Good variety.

FWIW

TIM

Q_Egg 11-09-2006 09:44 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by The_Kapn
You might take a look at Epp Farms out of Newton, KS
$17.50 for 20 lbs including shipping.

http://www.bbqwoodpellets.com/bbq_wood_pellet_cart.htm

Good variety.

FWIW

TIM

...Thanks Kapn ... that's a good looking source at a very competitive cost. I will definitely send them an order for some of their mixed blends in 40# bags. Sounds like they pay attention to their quality and consistency.

Regards,

SloppyQ 11-09-2006 07:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Plowboy
http://ronzsmokinwood.com/catalog/in...e8a31c70550cc8

I clicked into this site from BBQ-Brethren.com. Does this seem like a good price for Traeger pellets or am I missing something?

These prices look good other than shipping, now I know just how much I got screwed. I payed around 19.00 per 20# bag from the supplier at the lake plus the fuel to go pick them up. Bet ya I change, think I may try Branch Creek, don't need much I'm still using stick burner for comps.

Lee (SloppyQ)


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