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View Full Version : opinions on whole brisket or flats...


Homebrewed Q
01-17-2011, 06:48 PM
Still new to the cookoff circuit. Just wondering if flats or whole brisket is better for comps. I have a BWS Fatboy that I'll be using at comps if that helps with any opinions.

boogiesnap
01-17-2011, 06:52 PM
whole packers is what most cook, i'm pretty sure.
slice the flat, and cube the point for "burnt ends'.

personally, now that the holidays are over i will be experimenting with a different presentation.

Homebrewed Q
01-17-2011, 06:55 PM
Should have mentioned that I'll be doing IBCA and TGCBCA comps which ask for 7 slices only, no burnt ends.

smokaholic
01-17-2011, 07:12 PM
Sounds like they dont know what they are missing :-P

Carnivorous Endeavors BBQ
01-17-2011, 07:37 PM
With my limited skill, i'd still recommend cooking a packer as the part of the flat that is under the point seems to come out juicier than the rest of the flat. Not trying to state fact or science, just my opinion from my experience.

Jeff Hughes
01-17-2011, 07:41 PM
Sounds like they dont know what they are missing :-P

He can't turn them in, slices only...

Buster Dog BBQ
01-17-2011, 07:52 PM
If you can only turn in slices i say go with a flat so you can season all 4 sides. I also would try to get big flats. I hear guys getting 4lb flats. To me that's just a big hamburger when it's done.

I think the thing you want to look for is a good thick flat.

Divemaster
01-18-2011, 10:07 AM
If I could only turn in slices, I'd go full packer with each slice containing both the flat and point.

Since I cook KCBS, I split a packer and make burnt ends....

Homebrewed Q
01-18-2011, 11:48 AM
With my limited skill, i'd still recommend cooking a packer as the part of the flat that is under the point seems to come out juicier than the rest of the flat. Not trying to state fact or science, just my opinion from my experience.

I guess that's what I'm trying to figure out, does it help the moistnees of the flat cooking a whole brisket.

slowerlowerbbq
01-18-2011, 12:38 PM
FWIW, I sure would hate to cook a brisket without burnt ends, so I always go with a full packer. But I will add this: last year, we were doing a practice cook and I asked the wife to pick up a brisket at the grocery store. Packers are hard to come by around here and I usually have to special order them, but our local grocer usually has these huge 9-10 Lb. flats...good enough for a practice cook...except...they had no more of these flats. She came home with this tiny little 4Lbs. piece of flat that I was sure was going to end up tasting like a shoe. So I used my normal method for cooking (hot and fast, injected with Butchers) and I was SHOCKED at how good the end result was. My guess is the Butchers had A LOT to do with it...but still it was mighty tasty!

I guess what I'm saying is...there's a lot of great advice here and there is no right way, so go with what works, try all the methods provided here and go with what you like best. Best of luck!

Southern Home Boy
01-18-2011, 12:41 PM
I guess that's what I'm trying to figure out, does it help the moistnees of the flat cooking a whole brisket.

I think so. The only issue is the fat between the point and the flat needs to be trimmed off pretty well before putting the slice in the box, but I've definitely found that my best slices come from the flat portion under the point.

JD McGee
01-18-2011, 01:16 PM
I have cooked both and have done well with both...I prefer buying packers and trimming the flat to box size...then using the point for "Judges Treats"...

Homebrewed Q
01-18-2011, 01:33 PM
I have cooked both and have done well with both...I prefer buying packers and trimming the flat to box size...then using the point for "Judges Treats"...

Well the point "treats" would be strictly for us. IBCA wants 7 slices only, no garnish, no burnt ends, no sauce added in the box. They provide the turn in box with a sheet of foil which must be the only thing in the box with the 7 slices. I'll probably continue to buy whole packers, we eat what's left over anyway.

roksmith
01-18-2011, 03:18 PM
We buy packers, but separate and trim to fit the box prior to cooking. That way we get bark and smoke ring all the way around. Juiciness is not an issue if you start with a good quality brisket..Even less if you inject.

bignburlyman
01-19-2011, 07:46 AM
I cook flats all the time, but it is only for home consumption or friends. The one time I tried to make burnt ends with the point from a whole packer, I wound up with a pan full of doggie treats. I couldn't even chew them, lol.

AZScott
01-19-2011, 09:29 AM
Lately for my practice cooks I've been using Costco flats and points from Ranch Market (a Hispanic grocery store). I don't see any difference with them being separated and coming from different packers.

Stoke&Smoke
01-19-2011, 01:57 PM
Besides really liking the leftovers, I'm suprised nobody yet mentioned the price.

Around here anyway, flats can be two, sometimes three times the price per lb. Seems silly to pay a butcher that much for making a cut you can make yourself, should you want to

bignburlyman
01-19-2011, 03:31 PM
Besides really liking the leftovers, I'm suprised nobody yet mentioned the price.

Around here anyway, flats can be two, sometimes three times the price per lb. Seems silly to pay a butcher that much for making a cut you can make yourself, should you want to

Where I buy my flats is usually about double the cost of whole packers. But one difference is I usually only trim less than 8 ounces of fat from a flat, but the last few packers I must have trimmed at least 2 pounds of fat from each.

barbefunkoramaque
01-19-2011, 06:14 PM
I cook flats all the time, but it is only for home consumption or friends. The one time I tried to make burnt ends with the point from a whole packer, I wound up with a pan full of doggie treats. I couldn't even chew them, lol.

I am not understanding this at all... is there a terminology error? Not being disrespectful but if you need help making burnt ends from the POINT, which is the proper cut to make them from... this is the right forum.

boogiesnap
01-19-2011, 06:49 PM
I am not understanding this at all... is there a terminology error? Not being disrespectful but if you need help making burnt ends from the POINT, which is the proper cut to make them from... this is the right forum.


WHAT??? say again donnie??

bignburlyman
01-19-2011, 08:23 PM
I cook flats all the time, but it is only for home consumption or friends. The one time I tried to make burnt ends with the point from a whole packer, I wound up with a pan full of doggie treats. I couldn't even chew them, lol.

I am not understanding this at all... is there a terminology error? Not being disrespectful but if you need help making burnt ends from the POINT, which is the proper cut to make them from... this is the right forum.

I don't think I made a terminology error, I did make the burnt ends from the point. It was mainly an unsuccessful cook overall, it was the first time I used my new Traeger and I just didn't cook everything long enough. I have just never made another attempt, because I prefer to eat the slices I get from the flat. That is the main reason I cook flats most of the time. I do like burnt ends, but really like a good, moist, tasty slice of brisket. Just like some people would rather eat a Sirloin steak than a Ribeye.

JD McGee
01-19-2011, 09:37 PM
Besides really liking the leftovers, I'm suprised nobody yet mentioned the price.

Around here anyway, flats can be two, sometimes three times the price per lb. Seems silly to pay a butcher that much for making a cut you can make yourself, should you want to

Tru-dat...flats are 3.49-3.99 per lb at the business Costco...choice packers are 1.99 per lb...no brainer! I don't mind a little trimmin"...:cool:

Three porks
01-19-2011, 09:59 PM
I guess that's what I'm trying to figure out, does it help the moistnees of the flat cooking a whole brisket.

yes it does

thillin
01-19-2011, 10:17 PM
I've had good success either way. Stuck with packers. Best luck with flats were larger flats with a bit of the point left on.

barbefunkoramaque
01-20-2011, 10:38 AM
I don't think I made a terminology error, I did make the burnt ends from the point. It was mainly an unsuccessful cook overall, it was the first time I used my new Traeger and I just didn't cook everything long enough. I have just never made another attempt, because I prefer to eat the slices I get from the flat. That is the main reason I cook flats most of the time. I do like burnt ends, but really like a good, moist, tasty slice of brisket. Just like some people would rather eat a Sirloin steak than a Ribeye.

Ahghh I assumed that if someone could not make a set of mock burnt ends with the point then maybe they might be using a flat and think its a point.

Okay... then listen to the forum closely. They can advise you how to make mock burnt ends very well using the point. Its quite easy. But you really need to cook the point in while first.

Big George's BBQ
01-20-2011, 01:15 PM
I have always used really nice flats. Unfortunately my Brisket needs a lot of work. That being said I have also missed out on having burnt ends. Will have to look into doing whole packers

Arlin_MacRae
01-20-2011, 01:34 PM
OK, Donnie, you made me look to see why the you called burnt ends made from the point 'mock' burnt ends. For those who haven't spent time reading up on them like I just did, 'traditional' burnt ends were made from the side trimmings of the brisket, but they were so good - and so few could be made from a brisket - they started using the point so they could make more. Interesting. You learn something every day!

Arlin

sitnfat
01-20-2011, 07:27 PM
Packer, fat is flavor and a packer has a lot of fat

Just Smokin' Around
01-20-2011, 09:37 PM
If I want packers, I have to order from a butcher. No one carries them except Wal-Mart and they are Select and they don't always have them. Sam's usually has 7-9 pound choice flats, so that's what we've gone to. We did packer's for a while, but changed last year because that's what was available. Packer's from a butcher is more expensive than flats at Sam's. Same quality - usually same brand.