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View Full Version : FEC-300 vs. Ole Hickory


Bigmista
10-13-2010, 10:09 AM
IF you had to choose one to have in your restaurant, which would you choose and why?

chuckswagonbbq
10-13-2010, 10:21 AM
I own a FEC-100 so I am going say go with the FEC-300. I put out a consistant product every single time.

monty3777
10-13-2010, 10:23 AM
delete

getyourrubonbbq
10-13-2010, 10:30 AM
Go with a Southern Pride...I'm just sayin:-P

Bigmista
10-13-2010, 11:10 AM
Go with a Southern Pride...I'm just sayin:-P

Why?

Plowboy
10-13-2010, 12:34 PM
I have an FEC-500. I've cooked on Southern Prides as well on multiple occasions. In a commerical setting, the FEC-300,500,750 is the only choice for me. This summer we cooked 500+ lbs of pork butt and got a 64% yield. It is a fact that a pellet pit has a better average yield than gas or wood/charcoal.

big brother smoke
10-13-2010, 12:49 PM
Which product delivers the best smoke ingrediant is my hijacking question?

Plowboy
10-13-2010, 01:51 PM
Which product delivers the best smoke ingrediant is my hijacking question?

"Best" is subjective and not everyone will agree. That said, you are going to get a great product out of both types of pits. Both are smokers and both work. In a commercial environment, I want quality and profit. The FEC line would be my only choice.

Jacked UP BBQ
10-13-2010, 01:58 PM
I will say that my fec 750 works great and puts out a great product. I will say though that the rotisserrie on it sucks. It gets caught up a lot and is not very well balanced if thats te right word. There is no comparison to the fec 100 and the 750, the 750 has 3 burn pots and puts out the perfect amount of smoke. I have cooked on and have ahd food off of both the ole hickory and fec. The ole hickory also puts out a good product if you add enough wood, but thats the thing you have to stay on top of it and find the right amount. I would say FEC only if it is stationary.

Plowboy
10-13-2010, 02:04 PM
The big FEC pits smoke differently from the 100's, too. You get a better smoke at higher temps, which isn't true with pellet grills and smaller pits. I get great smoke off of the 500 running at 250 degrees. I agree that it is hard to compare the 100 and the big FEC pits.

Bigmista
10-13-2010, 03:00 PM
Maybe I need to find someone locally with a 300 or larger and ask them to let me cook some product in it and see if I like it.

How do the FEC's work in a restaurant setting where they are running everyday for 20+ hours/day?

The reason I ask is that in restaurants and catering kitchens in California (at least in Long Beach) smokers need to be NSF certified even if they are outside.

Jacked UP BBQ
10-13-2010, 03:24 PM
I use the fec 750 from april 15 - soptember 30 almost every day all day. It runs everyweekend non stop. Yes I have had problems with the eleectrical and it has screwed me in some cruch times but i travel with it and I dont think it is built for that.If you get a neww cooker and keep it in a kitchen you will not have any problems with fec.

Plowboy
10-13-2010, 04:02 PM
Maybe I need to find someone locally with a 300 or larger and ask them to let me cook some product in it and see if I like it.

How do the FEC's work in a restaurant setting where they are running everyday for 20+ hours/day?

The reason I ask is that in restaurants and catering kitchens in California (at least in Long Beach) smokers need to be NSF certified even if they are outside.

Gates BBQ, a KC legend, uses FEC's to cook their ribs. They have several restaurants all over the city and cook most of their ribs from a central location.

The FEC's are NSF certfied.

Bbq Bubba
10-13-2010, 09:03 PM
I have not cooked on a commercial FE but have used the Southern Pride units 300 and 500.
Great smokers, consistent product, i also seem to get great yield (almost 70%) on butts. You do have to feed it logs regularly and i would guess the maintenance would be lower than the FE's.
The Old Hickorys are basically the same as the SP.

Good luck and where's the new location going to be? :thumb:

On edit...
You really want a non stop smoking machine, look at the JR Oyler.

Just sayin.

PorkQPine
10-13-2010, 09:39 PM
I did a lot of research before opening the restaurant and chose the OH. Can't imagine anything that would be better. IMHO, they are all good so choose what you think goes along with your BBQ philosophy. I wanted real wood logs so OH or SP were the choices and OH was cheaper so it was a no brainer.

Bigmista
10-13-2010, 11:18 PM
I have not cooked on a commercial FE but have used the Southern Pride units 300 and 500.
Great smokers, consistent product, i also seem to get great yield (almost 70%) on butts. You do have to feed it logs regularly and i would guess the maintenance would be lower than the FE's.
The Old Hickorys are basically the same as the SP.

Good luck and where's the new location going to be? :thumb:

On edit...
You really want a non stop smoking machine, look at the JR Oyler.

Just sayin.

I wish the Oyler was in the same zip code as my price range.

PorkQPine
10-14-2010, 09:53 AM
You might want to check on the cost of pellets vs. oak logs as well as storage for the logs compared to the bags of pellets. For me oak logs were cheaper than pellets and I had storage space for them. I put one log in at night for the overnight cook and that log was all it took since the OH and SP use gas for the primary heat source with the logs providing the smoke. The pellet units use pellets for heat as well as smoke so they use a lot more pellets than the log/gas units.

NorthwestBBQ
10-14-2010, 12:55 PM
IMHO Southern Pride is the best.

kurtsara
10-14-2010, 04:50 PM
You might want to check on the cost of pellets vs. oak logs as well as storage for the logs compared to the bags of pellets. For me oak logs were cheaper than pellets and I had storage space for them. I put one log in at night for the overnight cook and that log was all it took since the OH and SP use gas for the primary heat source with the logs providing the smoke. The pellet units use pellets for heat as well as smoke so they use a lot more pellets than the log/gas units.


how much gas are you using overnight with the one log though?

Elegant Bear
10-14-2010, 06:27 PM
I have an FEC-500. I've cooked on Southern Prides as well on multiple occasions. In a commerical setting, the FEC-300,500,750 is the only choice for me. This summer we cooked 500+ lbs of pork butt and got a 64% yield. It is a fact that a pellet pit has a better average yield than gas or wood/charcoal.

Please forgive the naive question, but can it be used inside with ventilation or strictly outside?

Bigmista
10-14-2010, 07:27 PM
The can be inside with proper ventilation.

Prairie Smoke
10-15-2010, 10:06 AM
I put one log in at night for the overnight cook and that log was all it took since the OH and SP use gas for the primary heat source with the logs providing the smoke. .

Does one log last - and smoke - all night?

Same question, asked differently - how long would a large log (say 8" diameter by 12" long) smoke before being burned up by the fire?

This question applies to both OH and SP pits.

Prairie Smoke
10-15-2010, 10:09 AM
I have an FEC-500. I've cooked on Southern Prides as well on multiple occasions. In a commerical setting, the FEC-300,500,750 is the only choice for me. This summer we cooked 500+ lbs of pork butt and got a 64% yield. It is a fact that a pellet pit has a better average yield than gas or wood/charcoal.

Very intriguing Todd... "it is a fact"... Why is the yield higher in a pellet pit? I'm not doubting you, just curious about the reason. That's a pretty big savings in a commercial environment.

Did you trim any fat cap off these butts?
Thanks :becky:

Prairie Smoke
10-15-2010, 10:12 AM
The big FEC pits smoke differently from the 100's, too. You get a better smoke at higher temps, which isn't true with pellet grills and smaller pits. I get great smoke off of the 500 running at 250 degrees. I agree that it is hard to compare the 100 and the big FEC pits.

I never realized this! I too am shopping for a big commercial pit to expand my catering operations and I was leaning towards OH / SP just because of the greater control over the amount of smoke flavour - and perceived "level" of smoke flavour from the logs. My pellet experience is only with the FEC100 and Traeger... So if this is true it helps with my decision...

Plowboy
10-17-2010, 11:48 PM
Very intriguing Todd... "it is a fact"... Why is the yield higher in a pellet pit? I'm not doubting you, just curious about the reason. That's a pretty big savings in a commercial environment.

Did you trim any fat cap off these butts?
Thanks :becky:

What I've been told is that gas robs moisture from the air while a pellet fire doesn't. You'd have to ask Fast Eddy or Cookshack or maybe Candy Sue why that is. I didn't stay at a Holiday Inn Express last night.

Did not trim fat cap. You know how much work it is to trim on 500+ lbs of butts. Yikes! I was just happy when it was all over. That was a lot of pork! We did 800 the year before.

EDIT: The 64% was AFTER we pulled everything and bagged it. Fat was removed after cooking and before weighing. Just to be clear.

Plowboy
10-17-2010, 11:51 PM
I never realized this! I too am shopping for a big commercial pit to expand my catering operations and I was leaning towards OH / SP just because of the greater control over the amount of smoke flavour - and perceived "level" of smoke flavour from the logs. My pellet experience is only with the FEC100 and Traeger... So if this is true it helps with my decision...

A pellet pit and a stick pit will be different. They are two different animals. I love the food that comes off of that big pellet pit, though. I've said more than once that I'd like to take my 100's off of the competition trailer and replace with a FEC-300. That would be the perfect comp machine for me having spent time with the FEC-500.

jbrink01
10-18-2010, 01:17 PM
Todd said it. I have 2 - 500's, and get great yield.

Jeff Hughes
10-27-2010, 09:18 AM
What I've been told is that gas robs moisture from the air while a pellet fire doesn't. You'd have to ask Fast Eddy or Cookshack or maybe Candy Sue why that is. I didn't stay at a Holiday Inn Express last night.




That make sense based on a conversation I had with Eddy last year...

Ranbo
10-27-2010, 05:27 PM
I have a had a long agonizing look about this myself. I personally would go with the FEC but the Ole Hickory is a fine machine. This is based on watching friends who have bussiness and use both kinds of smokers every day. When ever my wife finally says yes to the resturaunt it will be a FEC, but I do not like the rotissere in the FEC 300. I would like a little more room between shelfs. Part of the overall decision for me is based on it's easier to get pellets in certain flavors cheaper than wood.

BRBBQ
11-03-2010, 09:21 PM
If you go OLE Hick, go the bigger EL model, better flavor

jbrink01
11-03-2010, 09:43 PM
I have an FEC-500. I've cooked on Southern Prides as well on multiple occasions. In a commerical setting, the FEC-300,500,750 is the only choice for me. This summer we cooked 500+ lbs of pork butt and got a 64% yield. It is a fact that a pellet pit has a better average yield than gas or wood/charcoal.

I'll cook 12,000 pounds of brisket & 14,000 pounds of pork this year on my 2 FEC-500's alomg with roughly 5000 pork steaks, 500 slabs of ribs and many brats, hot dogs and side dishes. There is NO better brisket machine.

Oh yeah, chicken is good too!

Bentley
11-03-2010, 11:48 PM
IF you had to choose one to have in your restaurant, which would you choose and why?


Being partial to Pellets I would say FEC, I on the other had would probably opt for the 500. You will probably grow into it. Why? 100% hardwood cooking, consistant cooking, no matter who is doing it...Would not have to worry if I put in the correct amount of stick to suppliment the gas with the Ole Hickory. Wish I could tell you one was more efficent then the other, dont know...Did I mention consistant cooks each and every time no matter who is doing the cooking? Do you ever want to vacation?

toys4dlr
11-05-2010, 10:36 AM
We have only been open for a little over 4 months (Q-to-U-BBQ in Anthem, AZ), but I love our FEC 500. The easy of use and I can train others to do my job. Did I mention that it is very consistent.

For me, the pellets are easier to store and actually easier to get than hickory here in the desert. FYI I go through one 40 lb bag a day.

Plowboy
11-08-2010, 12:22 PM
We have only been open for a little over 4 months (Q-to-U-BBQ in Anthem, AZ), but I love our FEC 500. The easy of use and I can train others to do my job. Did I mention that it is very consistent.

For me, the pellets are easier to store and actually easier to get than hickory here in the desert. FYI I go through one 40 lb bag a day.

Gotta be cleaner to store pellets than logs and charcoal. Logs sometimes come with bugs, too.

JD McGee
11-08-2010, 06:39 PM
It would be interesting to know how cost effective one is from the other as well...say for instance a 12 hour smoke with pellets vs a 12 hour smoke with gas and logs...:idea: If folks are going to be running these things 8-16 hours or more per day the cost savings could be a major factor in purchasing. Along the same lines I would also be looking into warranty, reliability, and service...:-P

big brother smoke
11-08-2010, 11:06 PM
Good question, JD?

C Rocke
11-09-2010, 04:15 PM
Neil - Thought only "real" BBQ would do?

Plowboy
11-09-2010, 04:40 PM
Neil - Thought only "real" BBQ would do?

Neil is selling out to the man.

Bbq Bubba
11-09-2010, 05:37 PM
Neil - Thought only "real" BBQ would do?

:twisted:

fireman_pete
11-09-2010, 06:53 PM
Who says pellets arent "real bbq".....just a really small stick burner

Bbq Bubba
11-09-2010, 07:05 PM
Who says pellets arent "real bbq".....just a really small stick burner

If that helps you sleep at night. :thumb:

Plowboy
11-09-2010, 08:29 PM
If that helps you sleep at night. :thumb:

Actually, pellets do help me sleep at night. I recall leaving a pellet cooker running this weekend and getting a full night at a hotel about 8 miles away.

fireman_pete
11-09-2010, 10:02 PM
^^^^^^What He Said!

SmokinOkie
11-10-2010, 09:57 AM
the biggest different in "smoke on the FE line is the number of burners. A 100 and 300 have one burner, a 500 has two and the 750 has three. Obviously with two or three pots going you'll have that much more "smoke".

I know I've seen some comparison on running them I'll see if I can find it.

You need to price pellets, then figure out which unit and what "average" temp.

For the gassers, will you be running 100% gas (come on now, some do) or will it be a blend on one log and mostly gas or will it be all logs. Then you have to figure out food costs.

Are they all great units. Yes. SP and OH have been around a long time, the FE may be a new unit out there, but it gives you great options. You can mix / match the wood. Try to keep 5 or 6 types of wood logs around.

Russ

big brother smoke
11-10-2010, 10:45 AM
the biggest different in "smoke on the FE line is the number of burners. A 100 and 300 have one burner, a 500 has two and the 750 has three. Obviously with two or three pots going you'll have that much more "smoke".

I know I've seen some comparison on running them I'll see if I can find it.

You need to price pellets, then figure out which unit and what "average" temp.

For the gassers, will you be running 100% gas (come on now, some do) or will it be a blend on one log and mostly gas or will it be all logs. Then you have to figure out food costs.

Are they all great units. Yes. SP and OH have been around a long time, the FE may be a new unit out there, but it gives you great options. You can mix / match the wood. Try to keep 5 or 6 types of wood logs around.

Russ

I do keep 5 or six different logs around sometimes and it can be a PITA and the Farking Bugs that go with the logs...

Do you Pellet pooping guys worry about something malfunctioning whilst sleeping? Can you check temps from your hotel room at comps, etc.? I have been on a comp team where the FEC-100 malfunctioned in the middle of the night and we had to pull McGyver mods to make turn in times.

Bentley
11-10-2010, 10:11 PM
Do you Pellet pooping guys worry about something malfunctioning whilst sleeping? Can you check temps from your hotel room at comps, etc.?

I guess if your pit is reliable like mine, no. Do I use Mavericks to moniter temps in case Mr Nimrod(me) forgot to add gas to generator (use promoters electricty, thats a good one) or pellets before going to bed, you bet. Can you moniter a stick burner from your hotel room? I guess you can any pit with a Stoker hooked up to your pit as long as you had computer access at your location.

Pellets were good enough to take 2nd Runner up at the Royal Open this year, does that help?

Bentley
11-10-2010, 10:23 PM
Maybe I need to find someone locally with a 300 or larger and ask them to let me cook some product in it and see if I like it.



Larry Hill from Pelletheads.com has a 500 in Hanford, 3 hours up the road...for two hot links on an Sunday, I will get you in the door if you like...I will even ride with you and watch you cook on it! :bow:

On a serious note, he is coming down to Pasadena on December 4th, might be a stretch, but I might beable to get him to bring it an have you cook on it? Let me know...

Jacked UP BBQ
11-11-2010, 08:40 AM
I would stay away from the 300 if it only has one burner. You will not get enough smoke.

fireman_pete
11-11-2010, 08:49 AM
Larry (rib ticklers) has a FEC 500 I am sure he would be happy to let you cook on or see. He is in Oceanside.

ThomEmery
11-11-2010, 04:54 PM
500 is a nice unit

SmokinOkie
11-12-2010, 08:20 AM
...
Do you Pellet pooping guys worry about something malfunctioning whilst sleeping? Can you check temps from your hotel room at comps, etc.? I have been on a comp team where the FEC-100 malfunctioned in the middle of the night and we had to pull McGyver mods to make turn in times.


You calling us Pellet Poopers such names as Pellet Poopers is insulating to us Pellet Pooper. You can only call us that if you are one :becky:

We know it's jealousy of our sleep :heh:

Not sure what "checking temps from a hotel means" to this thread, but you can buy a temp probe, hook it up to an internet connection and monitor it form your room. If I owned a restaurant, I'd probably do that, so great idea.

Think about it this way.

If you're using a gasser, do you worry about running out of gas?

If you're using a rotisserie, do you worry about the gear breaking?

If you use electricity, do you worry about electricity going out?

Use a stick burner? How about the weather, falling asleep from an overnight cook (can't stay up 7 nights a way all year)

you better if you're in the business. I've either had it happen or seen ALL of the above happen.

It's pretty old news now when someone who calls them Pellet Poppers points out that they saw one broke somewhere. Does it happen, yes. Often, no. I think preventive maintenance takes care of 95% of common problems.

If you're worried about it in a restaurant, you'll probably worry about anything you have.

HoDeDo
11-12-2010, 08:41 AM
Depending on if Neil is planning on keeping it inside or out, that may be driving some of the decision making... They developed the 300 to have a model that would go into EXISTING buildings. Many times a 500 is too large to fit through the openings, etc. if you are trying to build it into the kitchen. A 300 was designed to fit through a set of dbl doors, both height and width wise. I dont believe a 500 will. So if you are going to have the room to get it in the bldg, or you are going with an outdoor unit... go with the FEC500. IF you are trying to get indoors, into an existing kitchen/tighter space, go with the FEC300. Having said that Neil, you know we have a buddy who has one on his showroom floor that he would make you a heck of a deal on :) Now my cartage fee to CA might erase all that to bring it to ya!!!! <insert evil laugh> but the girls would love to play with Morgan...

Big Poppa
11-12-2010, 10:47 AM
whatever you get ...get one size bigger than you need...it is a great rule of thumb for media whor....types!

Jorge
11-12-2010, 11:12 AM
I've been told, by more than one person that has one, that a 500 turns out a better product than the 100. Whether it's the extra pots, the volume of meat and the moisture it gives off, I don't know.

I'd suspect you'd get some sort of break on insurance as well because you are buring wood, instead of having compressed or natural gas around. Storage of pellets will take up less space than storing cords of wood as well, and they come in sealed bags to protect them from the elements.

As for dependability, I think you can probably order a spare controller board, and a few other parts to go along with the cooker if you are looking at an investment that size. As Bentley pointed out, there are ways to monitor the pit. If you've got a problem it's not a big deal to replace a board, pin, auger if you have to.

NorthwestBBQ
11-15-2010, 03:58 PM
I'll bet my list of successful BBQ restaurants that use SP or OH is much longer than your FEC list.

jbrink01
11-16-2010, 08:55 PM
I'll bet my list of successful BBQ restaurants that use SP or OH is much longer than your FEC list.

So they make money. Is their BBQ any good? The FEC 500 cooks better food than the OH, IMHO.

NorthwestBBQ
11-16-2010, 09:18 PM
So they make money. Is their BBQ any good? The DEC 500 cooks better food than the OH, IMHO.

Real wood fired BBQ blows compressed sawdust out of the water every time, bro.

Jacked UP BBQ
11-16-2010, 10:58 PM
Real wood fired BBQ blows compressed sawdust out of the water every time, bro.

i have a fec750 and i would beg to differ

NorthwestBBQ
11-16-2010, 11:52 PM
i have a fec750 and i would beg to differ

Any experience with a SP or OH?

HoDeDo
11-17-2010, 08:27 PM
Real wood fired BBQ blows compressed sawdust out of the water every time, bro.

Not sure where you came up with this... esp. since those pits typically use GAS for the fuel source, and have a firebox to provide flavor/secondary heating source. Gas brings the pit up to temp, and typically kicks on to maintain temps. (unless the owner is choosing to run it on wood only.) Gas can impart a flavor other than wood... pellets on the other hand don't impart any flavor other than wood.

I'm not trying to say who produces better BBQ, But there are some large names using FEC pits in thier local and in chain restaurants. I wouldnt think the "list" of restaurants would be that big an issue...

They are both excellent, and proven pits, but Pellets have been proven to provide a better yield, and typically they are cheaper than gas to run. Those are the types of things that I would hope someone looking to use it in a commercial setting would be considering.... not just the list of who cooks on what.

And yes, I have cooked on all 3 OH, SP, and FEC. So outside of the tests done to show the cost advantages (better yield, lower operating cost, etc) , I can tell you my personal experience is that the FEC puts a better color on the meat, and does produce a consistent product. You wouldnt go wrong with any of those cookers. I just happen to like the FEC the best, having cooked on all three many times over.

NorthwestBBQ
11-17-2010, 09:13 PM
Not sure where you came up with this... esp. since those pits typically use GAS for the fuel source, and have a firebox to provide flavor/secondary heating source. Gas brings the pit up to temp, and typically kicks on to maintain temps. (unless the owner is choosing to run it on wood only.) Gas can impart a flavor other than wood... pellets on the other hand don't impart any flavor other than wood.

I'm not trying to say who produces better BBQ, But there are some large names using FEC pits in thier local and in chain restaurants. I wouldnt think the "list" of restaurants would be that big an issue...

They are both excellent, and proven pits, but Pellets have been proven to provide a better yield, and typically they are cheaper than gas to run. Those are the types of things that I would hope someone looking to use it in a commercial setting would be considering.... not just the list of who cooks on what.

And yes, I have cooked on all 3 OH, SP, and FEC. So outside of the tests done to show the cost advantages (better yield, lower operating cost, etc) , I can tell you my personal experience is that the FEC puts a better color on the meat, and does produce a consistent product. You wouldnt go wrong with any of those cookers. I just happen to like the FEC the best, having cooked on all three many times over.

Andy, I beg to differ. In comp and many restaurants the Southern Pride and Old Hickery Pits ONLY use gas to start the logs. They are computer controlled draft and temp controllers with very heavy duty rotisseries. The computer tells you when to add wood. I know you are all pellet heads but I would like to offer a different point of view.

Here's a few links to some happy Southern Pride owners:

http://www.bar-b-cutie.com/
http://www.stickyfingers.com/default.aspx
http://www.sonnysbbq.com/
http://www.hillscafe.com/
http://www.rodsbbq.com/
http://www.cattlemanssteakhouse.com/
http://www.hickoryhollowrestaurant.com/
http://www.longhornbarbecue.com/

Please contact them and find out the truth.

Jacked UP BBQ
11-17-2010, 09:34 PM
Any experience with a SP or OH?

yes i have. puts out a good product also. the smaller units of sp and oh i believe are better producers but when you get into larger volume the 750 is hard to compete with,

Bbq Bubba
11-17-2010, 09:45 PM
Once you cook on an Oyler, you'll never go back. :boxing:

big brother smoke
11-17-2010, 09:54 PM
Now we got another part to the saga. :pop2::pop2::pop2:

Oyler does look nice and worthy of this conversation. Is that wood only, Bubba?

jbrink01
11-17-2010, 09:56 PM
I was feeling compelled to argue a little more, but you know what, fark it. I'm gonna go put 30 turkeys on my FEC 500 and go to bed. I like my pit, and could give a sh*t less about your gas pits as my income is not affected in the least by them........

NorthwestBBQ
11-17-2010, 10:17 PM
Oilers are in the same class as the SP and OH. They're all computerized, wood burning. rotisserie pits. They all have gas and electric models but that's not what I'm talking about, now am I?

Jorge
11-18-2010, 07:24 AM
Andy, I beg to differ. In comp and many restaurants the Southern Pride and Old Hickery Pits ONLY use gas to start the logs. They are computer controlled draft and temp controllers with very heavy duty rotisseries. The computer tells you when to add wood. I know you are all pellet heads but I would like to offer a different point of view.

Here's a few links to some happy Southern Pride owners:

http://www.bar-b-cutie.com/
http://www.stickyfingers.com/default.aspx
http://www.sonnysbbq.com/
http://www.hillscafe.com/
http://www.rodsbbq.com/
http://www.cattlemanssteakhouse.com/
http://www.hickoryhollowrestaurant.com/
http://www.longhornbarbecue.com/

Please contact them and find out the truth.

I've eaten at one of those places, and my experience there doesn't really support your argument.

You made a pretty strong statement to begin with. I think it's fair to say that SP and OH can turn out a great product. When you start tossing out absolutes is when you get into trouble.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

NorthwestBBQ
11-18-2010, 06:36 PM
I've eaten at one of those places, and my experience there doesn't really support your argument.

You made a pretty strong statement to begin with. I think it's fair to say that SP and OH can turn out a great product. When you start tossing out absolutes is when you get into trouble.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

I think I have a unique talent for overstating the obvious. :becky:

Jorge
11-18-2010, 06:49 PM
I think I have a unique talent for overstating the obvious. :becky:

Who am I to argue with, YOU?:becky:

NorthwestBBQ
11-18-2010, 07:25 PM
Who am I to argue with, YOU?:becky:

Good point. :thumb:

HoDeDo
11-18-2010, 11:42 PM
Andy, I beg to differ. In comp and many restaurants the Southern Pride and Old Hickery Pits ONLY use gas to start the logs. They are computer controlled draft and temp controllers with very heavy duty rotisseries. The computer tells you when to add wood. I know you are all pellet heads but I would like to offer a different point of view.

Actually, I am not sure what you are "differing" with me on. I said that all the pits would be great pits, I said I would take any of them. I also said that owners could choose to run them on all wood...

I am sure all the folks you mentioned are very happy with their pits, I know folks with both OH and SP pits currently that are happy with them. In the last 20 years, we have owned or cooked several versions of both, and believe they cook just fine. I think it is fair to say that FEC owners are very happy with thier pits also.

What I tried to provide was objective info, A local Legendary BBQ chain did an extensive TCO/ROI model - on product yield, and cost of running the three pits. The net-net of thier research is that pellet pits provide a higher yield, and are cheaper to run. Then I added my subjective opinion, that the pellet cooker puts a nicer color on the meat. That isnt bashing the other two pits... it is sharing data , and my opinion, having cooked lots of meat in all three brands of cooker.

I will reiterate, all three are excellent pits, and would serve the purpose of preparing catering food well.
The new oylers are fine, but the coolest ones are the older units. They are like a willie wonka choc factory machine... with levers and switches opening the intake and exhaust. They are a mechanical marvel. Something to be said for the engineering that made them work!
I will also say those "quirks" make the pit fun, too. Our SP, in the winter we chose not to start ours with the gas at all. The old gas valves had a safety mechanisim on them, that required the ambient temp. of the probe to be 50 degrees, or the valve would not open. That probe was about 6" above the door opening, on the front wall of the pit. To get the gas to light on a cold cook, we had to pre-warm the probe with a lighter or butane torch... getting to it was a pain that got ya greasy, so we just started it with a weed burner in the firebox. I'm not bashing the SP, as I said it was a safety feature... just saying that older ones can be fun to play with too. I get to play with an Oyler, at Bob's shop now, and it is a site to behold for sure.

so to summarize... They are all fine units, I'd be happy to own all three... but, if I had to put my hard earned money down on one in 2010/11, it would be an FEC, for the objective reasons I have noted. I definitely like pellet cookers, and love my FEC, but I dont feel I was "bashing" the others, or giving them a slight. Just providing the objective input I had, as well as my opinion, which I believe was asked for.
I am going to discount your "pellet head" comment. I have as many years (probably more) using the SP/OH, and lots of other pits (Kingfishers for comps, Southern Style cookers, etc.)The HoDeDo's have owned just about every cooker out there, over the last 30 years. So only about 1/3 of my cooking life has been with pellet pits. Again, just trying to clarify that I'm not bashing either of the other pits, or owners of them that are happy.

JD McGee
11-19-2010, 08:12 AM
"A local Legendary BBQ chain did an extensive TCO/ROI model - on product yield, and cost of running the three pits. The net-net of thier research is that pellet pits provide a higher yield, and are cheaper to run."

That pretty much answered my question...thanks Andy! :-P

ZILLA
11-19-2010, 08:58 AM
I have information on two used Oilers in Iowa if your interested. The older units.

Bbq Bubba
11-19-2010, 07:21 PM
I have information on two used Oilers in Iowa if your interested. The older units.

Send me what ya have Zilla. :thumb:

NorthwestBBQ
11-19-2010, 07:48 PM
LYNCHBURG, Tenn. (October 23, 2010) - QUAU from Brimfield, Ill., claimed the title of Grand Champion at the 22nd Annual Jack Daniel’s World Championship Invitational Barbecue held in Lynchburg, TN cooking on an Old Hickory Pit!. :grin:

Butcher BBQ
11-19-2010, 08:10 PM
LYNCHBURG, Tenn. (October 23, 2010) - QUAU from Brimfield, Ill., claimed the title of Grand Champion at the 22nd Annual Jack Danielís World Championship Invitational Barbecue held in Lynchburg, TN cooking on an Old Hickory Pit! :grin:

Wow, did he change pits from what he normally cooks on?

NorthwestBBQ
11-19-2010, 08:16 PM
Wow, did he change pits from what he normally cooks on?

The pics are mine, but I made the assumption from this link under the OH customer spotlight page: http://www.olehickorypits.com/Customer%20Spotlight.aspx.

HoDeDo
11-19-2010, 10:41 PM
LYNCHBURG, Tenn. (October 23, 2010) - QUAU from Brimfield, Ill., claimed the title of Grand Champion at the 22nd Annual Jack Danielís World Championship Invitational Barbecue held in Lynchburg, TN cooking on an Old Hickory Pit!. :grin:

Hehe, very funny....Nice try... Funny lookin OH... :-D

47590

NorthwestBBQ
11-19-2010, 10:50 PM
Hehe, very funny....Nice try... Funny lookin OH... :-D

47590

I stand corrected, Andy, but it's still a log burner...I think it's about taste not efficiency. :-D

Bigmista
11-19-2010, 11:58 PM
Good Lawd! Are y'all still going on about this? I didn't get the spot and I have moved on. Let it go.

big brother smoke
11-20-2010, 10:40 AM
Good Lawd! Are y'all still going on about this? I didn't get the spot and I have moved on. Let it go.

Winter Blues is in the house!:laugh:

HoDeDo
11-20-2010, 11:59 AM
Good Lawd! Are y'all still going on about this? I didn't get the spot and I have moved on. Let it go.

It's Let go Neil... Just had to make sure folks knew I wasnt bashing those pits... and that people didnt think Mike cooked on an OH Pit for the Jack. I am not even going to get into a taste debate LOL Been avoiding that one for the whole thread.

JD McGee
11-20-2010, 12:27 PM
Winter Blues is in the house!:laugh:

Good Lawd! It's only November...:twisted:

BigBellyBBQ
11-26-2010, 06:55 PM
I will say that my fec 750 works great and puts out a great product. I will say though that the rotisserrie on it sucks. It gets caught up a lot and is not very well balanced if thats te right word. There is no comparison to the fec 100 and the 750, the 750 has 3 burn pots and puts out the perfect amount of smoke. I have cooked on and have ahd food off of both the ole hickory and fec. The ole hickory also puts out a good product if you add enough wood, but thats the thing you have to stay on top of it and find the right amount. I would say FEC only if it is stationary.

I have not cooked on a FEC, however we use a SP 500 and a SP 700 on a trailer, racks never jam unless you do something stupid..you dont have to wory about chips or pellets, go pick up some nice cooking fire wood and start cooking..as with all electric be sure of your power that you plug into...and I load up the rotiserie before I leave on the raod and travel with it loaded or even the night before for a load of butts.. Southern Pride all the way for me...the electric draw is very low as this is a propane over wood

smoque shack
01-13-2011, 02:02 PM
i looked at the FEC300 but i went ahead and got the FEC500 for a few bucks more [about 2k]....and i love it!!!