PDA

View Full Version : Why does sweet win?


Bigmista
03-31-2010, 02:07 PM
This is a question that has been stuck in my craw for a while now and I haven't gotten a satisfying answer yet. The BBQ I grew up on was savory and spicy. Most of the BBQ joints I've been to serve savory BBQ. The judges I've talked to say that sauces shouldn't hide the flavor of the meat.

Meat isn't sweet. But inevitably the entries that win are coated in a sugary sauce that most people say they wouldn't eat at home because it's too rich and too sweet.

So why does sweet win?

chambersuac
03-31-2010, 02:14 PM
Thanks for asking this here - I'd like to know, too...

Bigmista
03-31-2010, 02:20 PM
CBJ's please chime in since you are the one's making the choices.

G$
03-31-2010, 02:22 PM
no clue, but the sooner i get it through my head, the better off I'll be.

(by the way, a guess: When you go to a Q joint, you get a meal (or two ro three) and have more time to 'savor the flavors'. A comp is a bite (or two), and you better notice the flavor.)

Jacked UP BBQ
03-31-2010, 02:30 PM
Here is my thought. Whether people admit it or not, sweet is a good flavor. Spice is good, but may insult some people. If you take ten people, three will lie and say they love super spicy food, two will really like it and the other five will not like spice at all. So my thoughts are if you are throwing your food into a lottery and have a chance of playing the odds on your side, go with sweet, people more people just like it that way.

Bigmista
03-31-2010, 02:32 PM
Are you suggesting that sweet is easier to recognize as a flavor?

Bigmista
03-31-2010, 02:33 PM
Here is my thought. Whether people admit it or not, sweet is a good flavor. Spice is good, but may insult some people. If you take ten people, three will lie and say they love super spicy food, two will really like it and the other five will not like spice at all. So my thoughts are if you are throwing your food into a lottery and have a chance of playing the odds on your side, go with sweet, people more people just like it that way.

Then why not savory? Savory and spicy are different. People love beef and it isn't sweet.

G$
03-31-2010, 02:39 PM
Are you suggesting that sweet is easier to recognize as a flavor?

Perhaps it is 'easier' and 'safer' to 'jolt' someone with sweet (not hard to add a bunch of brown sugar) than to jolt them with spice (relatively more complexities to spice and you may ruin a palate when overdone).

BBQ_Mayor
03-31-2010, 02:39 PM
Not everybody likes spicy but everybody likes sweet. Then you also have the tang, don't forget to throw that into the mix of savory, spicy, and sweet.

Jacked UP BBQ
03-31-2010, 02:42 PM
Savory and spice are different correct. I think that a mix of a savory rub and some sweet sauce is a great combination. If you want to add a little spice go for it. A marriage of the flavors is great. I would not want to eat a plain savory rib because that is all it would be. SO if you marry all the flavors like we do, it is like a orgasm in your mouth and all of your taste buds will be popping!

Jacked UP BBQ
03-31-2010, 02:43 PM
Then why not savory? Savory and spicy are different. People love beef and it isn't sweet.

MY beef is sweet!:redface:

leanza
03-31-2010, 02:44 PM
IMO, because the palate responds to a sweet contrast to savory.

Bigmista
03-31-2010, 02:48 PM
my beef is sweet!:redface:

tmi.

ZILLA
03-31-2010, 02:52 PM
Is it possible that sweet wins more because sweet has become the expected norm for the CBJ in a KCBS competition? The "more common standard" that reigns in KCBS judging may be the answer. Diva has aluded to this a few times in other posts concerning % of CbJs at a contest. That's what judges want, that's the way they're trained, and cooks are expected to cook to that end to win. The more common standard.

Grillman
03-31-2010, 03:03 PM
Possibly some people don't understand that they like sweet meat flavor.
They think it's spicy or savory; but, it's really just sweet.:confused:

A number of years ago a Krispy Kreem Donut store opened up close to where
I worked, so the manager went there one day and bought several dozen
Donuts for us all.
I had a chocolate one...I couldn't taste the Chocolate or the donut itself.
All I could taste was SWEET (sugar). I said to the guy next to me "these
don't have any flavor; all they are is sweet"....he replied "yeah; it's great,
I love sweet".:doh:

This was about 9 or 10 years ago here in Denver, Colorado. Cars were
lined up for hours at these Krispy Kreem Donut stores that had just come
to Denver.
Most people like sweet; whether they know it or not.:crazy:

Don't believe what people say.....believe what they do!:thumb:

BBQchef33
03-31-2010, 03:07 PM
Agree with everythign said.. I'd like to add another twist too.

Its hard to explain thsi mindset.. but instead of looking at winners as high scorers(999)...its not always like that. They are just the highest scorers of a group. The winners are just NOT the low scorers. Using the kcbs weights, a 968 beats a 995 where that 5 was because u used the damn oregano that someones taste bud found bitter.

but its hard to get your score whacked by "sweet"..

To hot, to bland, too spicy, to salty... those profiles may score u down.. but we have to be WAYYYYY over the top to be 'Too sweet', so the taste(heaviest weighed) score stays up there.

Sometimes when experimenting, I look at it as " dont PISS OFF the judges" . All it takes at the table is to be the LEAST offensive with a winning 788 whereas the 995 got whacked because of too much of something in a risky profile. So it may not be that sweet wins, it just doesnt come with the risk of the other profiles. They bullseye to me is balance within your profile.

SmokeInDaEye
03-31-2010, 03:18 PM
Then why not savory? Savory and spicy are different. People love beef and it isn't sweet.

I go for umami.

Kosmo's Q
03-31-2010, 03:25 PM
Here’s my take.

Thousands of years ago all man had was their taste buds to judge if something would poison him or not. Sweet usually meant it was ok to eat whereas sour, bitter or salty probably was iffy. So it's probably in our DNA to be naturally attracted to sweet. Hell I don't really know just taking a stab at it. LOL

Bigmista
03-31-2010, 03:32 PM
Here’s my take.

Thousands of years ago all man had was their taste buds to judge if something would poison him or not. Sweet usually meant it was ok to eat whereas sour, bitter or salty probably was iffy. So it's probably in our DNA to be naturally attracted to sweet. Hell I don't really know just taking a stab at it. LOL


Then how did we ever become meat eaters?

KC_Bobby
03-31-2010, 03:35 PM
I wouldn't necessarily say sweet wins. I would say that sweetness being part of the overall flavor profile is a worthwhile element - at least for chicken and ribs and a touch on pork - not on brisket.

Bigmista
03-31-2010, 03:38 PM
I wouldn't necessarily say sweet wins. I would say that sweetness being part of the overall flavor profile is a worthwhile element - at least for chicken and ribs and a touch on pork - not on brisket.

Hard to argue with the American Royal Champion.

big brother smoke
03-31-2010, 03:41 PM
Mista,

What is spicy/savory to you, maybe too much to the other person. You know you like hot chit, lol!

Alexa RnQ
03-31-2010, 03:45 PM
I don't find that one-note sweet is a consistent winner. If it were, everyone could glaze their ribs with corn syrup and win.

There's a lot more to a successful flavor profile than just sweet.

BobBrisket
03-31-2010, 03:46 PM
Could it also be because with sweet........it's one profile, sweet and unless you go over board, it's a pleasant flavor profile.

Whereas, with spicy, heat, savory, it's many different possible profiles that if even one judge finds too hot, bitter, too salty, too peppery, etc, and so on, that one low score kills you.

Chili cook offs are much the same way. Many think the hotter I make it the better, but too hot is hard on the palette and kills the flavor of everything else. Where as a sweet chili is not well scored either. Those that balance out all the elements score well.

Cool thread. Curious to see how our Judge Members respond.

KC_Bobby
03-31-2010, 03:50 PM
Hard to argue with the American Royal Champion.

While I thank you for your confidence/respect, that was just a fortunate day ... very fortunate :thumb:. It could have been 100 other teams, my belief isn't worth more than anyone else's. I just wouldn't consider our BBQ necessarily sweet, but some of our turn ins do have a sweet element in the overall profile.

Keep in mind, flavors are subjective. So what I may not consider overly sweet, someone else is would.

Stoke&Smoke
03-31-2010, 04:06 PM
As a judge, I like balance, some sweet, some savory, salty, all in a nice combination. That said, as a cook in competition, it's all about what the judges like, and, at least in this part of the country, sweet seems to win more often than not. That is particularly evident by how many competition cooks use one particular brand of sauce so often.

Kosmo's Q
03-31-2010, 04:44 PM
Then how did we ever become meat eaters?

I guess Blues Hog was invented 1st :becky::becky::becky:

smoke showin'
03-31-2010, 04:55 PM
sweet taste better cold ,when the meat has been sitting for 30 minutes it still taste sweet

DocStl
03-31-2010, 07:01 PM
Its all in the judges head.... Since we were kids, sweet has been associated with good things, (candy, soda, cake, etc) happy times. So when your brain senses sweet, it triggers a good sense.
Almost everyone likes sweets, I would guesstimate just from my family, 25% like spicy or peppery. My theory anyway lol

Buster Dog BBQ
03-31-2010, 07:35 PM
I like to think that sweet makes it easier for the table. Think about a buffalo wing or something spicy. You take a bite or two and then all your are tasting is heat. You can take a glass of water and try to wash it out but it doesn't always work. With sweet. You can take a bite, rinse and you're back to normal. That's my opinion anyway. I wouldn't want my entry coming in behind someone who had spiced it up and the judge can't taste the flavor of my food.

Bigmista
03-31-2010, 07:49 PM
I guess this is why I like People's Choice contests. I can impress people with my BBQ as it is instead of having to make something special for the judges using ingredients that I would probably never use just to fit their flavor profile.

JD McGee
03-31-2010, 08:07 PM
...a little sweet...+...a little heat...+...a little twang...=...a whole lotta bang! :cool: The secret's in the sauce folks...:becky:

Rookie'48
03-31-2010, 09:34 PM
Personally, I'm not much in favor of "sweet" all by itself. Gimme some heat, some layers of flavors, or better yet, just the meat! Unfortunatly I'm in a distinct minority on this - if I think that it's 9's in flavor other judges will be biotching about "it's too hot", "too much garlic", "not what I'm used to", etc. I think that the reps have to get on the judges about the part that says "as presented by the cook", not what that particular judge personally likes.

nthole
03-31-2010, 09:41 PM
I'm a CBJ and I hate sweet. And if I get something super arse sweet I will mark it down. But the class I went to Bunny and Rich were the trainers and she said something that I still think of everytime I take a bite. If it's something you don't like, stop thinking of whether you like and and ask yourself, well IF I liked this type of flavor, would I think this is really good. So if I get something sweet I ask myself, if I did like sweet would I like this. Again, though, too super sweet (and I think some people out there are in danger of giving someone a sugar coma) then the score starts going down.

I wish KCBS would take that one line and somehow figure a way to include that in the judging instructions. You might see the scores start changing.

Bigmista
03-31-2010, 11:58 PM
My next contest I think I'm going to marinate my chicken in corn syrup, rub it with turbinado sugar, smoke it with maple and glaze it with honey.

Jeff Hughes
04-01-2010, 06:48 AM
It's all about balance for me.

Blues Hog is in my arsenal for, but never alone and never full strength.

For catering and at the take out stand, I provide sauce on the side.

Jeff Hughes
04-01-2010, 06:50 AM
I guess this is why I like People's Choice contests. I can impress people with my BBQ as it is instead of having to make something special for the judges using ingredients that I would probably never use just to fit their flavor profile.

Peoples choice is cool, and the recognition is great for businesses, but I don't really think they are "true" contests...

Lake Dogs
04-01-2010, 07:13 AM
I've judged in a number of contests, most being MIM/MBN. From what I've seen, there
is a difference in MBN to KCBS. The KCBS judges do seem to expect it to be sweeter
than the MBN judges, perse. However, in MBN, I've noticed a trend. 5, 6, 7 years ago
more often than not the winning entry had no sauce, none whatsoever, and the rubs
had very little sugars in them. 3, 4, 5 years ago we started seeing a little sauce on
a few, and occasionally one would win, but not often. Now, almost all have sauce.
It's not as sweet, averages being averages, as the KCBS that I've seen. I'm not
certain as to why the difference. For that matter, it could be the teams (different
teams KCBS vs. MBN) perception vs. the judges... (meaning the teams think the
judges want sweet so they make it sweet)

Many judges are women. In my personal experience, women prefer something a little
sweeter than the average guy. Being as spicy can get either skunky or just too hot
for some people, working averages, better to go with a little sweet than spicy. Also,
you can take the same entries on the same day, move them to a different table and
get different scores. It ends up that we're working averages, trying not to offend
anyone, and yet trying to stand out in a good way. There's a fine line between
standing out in a good way and standing out in a bad way.


I learned a lesson a long time back cooking in a chili cookoff. I'd made an average-hot
chili that day; not bland, but not really hot, just a good old fashioned chili. In the scoring
I got all 8's and 9's, except for one person. I was knocked right out of first place
by one person; she gave me a 1. Apparently it was too hot for her personal taste.
Mind you, it did tick me off. I wondered why someone who doesn't like spicy food ends
up judging a chili contest! She hasn't been back, thankfully. My point to this is that
there is a delicate balance, and the wise competitor will work the averages from the
center (meaning, dont offend). The thing in my chili that got me the 9's also got
me the 1. I'd rather have those 9's be 8's and have the 1 be a 7... This same thing
applies to BBQ, regardless of sanctioning body. THANK GOODNESS for
KCBS throwing out the lowest score!!!!!

I wonder, pondering, if KCBS tracks which judge gets their score thrown out the most
(percentage wise) and doesn't ask those judges back. Sorry, dont mean to hijack a
thread.

Sticks-n-chicks
04-01-2010, 07:51 AM
I'm a CBJ and I hate sweet. And if I get something super arse sweet I will mark it down. But the class I went to Bunny and Rich were the trainers and she said something that I still think of everytime I take a bite. If it's something you don't like, stop thinking of whether you like and and ask yourself, well IF I liked this type of flavor, would I think this is really good. So if I get something sweet I ask myself, if I did like sweet would I like this. Again, though, too super sweet (and I think some people out there are in danger of giving someone a sugar coma) then the score starts going down.

I wish KCBS would take that one line and somehow figure a way to include that in the judging instructions. You might see the scores start changing.

GREAT POINT! Should be read before each contest to the judges.

TooSaucedToPork
04-01-2010, 07:53 AM
Cooking at MIM for 7 years I have noticed a trend...On my old team we had a spicy-sweet rub and a semi sweet glaze. We fininshed in the 70's and 60's.

Every year since starting our own team we have sweetened the rub and sauce...every year we have climbed up in rank. 74th, 55th, 42nd, 23rd We have cooked the ribs the same, and last year we basically candied the ribs. 23rd - best score yet in MIM for our team. I think it is like any BBQ cook I have talked to says, my competition ribs are not what I make at home...they are too sweet.

I think it is like others have said...sweet is safe, sweet is comfortable, and you will get judges that score well on spice, they just have to be experienced. if you have 6 judges at a blind table, how many will be experienced? 4 if you are lucky right? So even if you get all 9's and 10's those 2 inexperienced judges will score that spice a 6 or 7 and there goes the trophy. Sweet is safe plain and simple...

topchefvt52
04-01-2010, 09:32 AM
My next contest I think I'm going to marinate my chicken in corn syrup, rub it with turbinado sugar, smoke it with maple and glaze it with honey.

Garnish it with cotton candy (red of course) and you have a winnah!!

Seriously, I think a lot has to do with the flavor profile of Q sauces over the years. When I was a kid, Open Pit was the only sauce in the pantry. It was a savory sauce. Then came along KC Masterpiece, Cattlemens and the rest. Thereafter everything that went on a grill was basted with sweet sauce, maybe with the exception of steak. Sweet Q sauce is what Americans have been eating for 30 years.

bigabyte
04-01-2010, 09:39 AM
It's an effect of human evolution. Recall that until very, very, very recently in human evolution, we had NO idea what was in the food, and only had sight, smell, touch and taste to go on, with taste being the major contributor and last line of defense of knowing what we ate was good for us or not.

While we have 5 basic flavors our tongues can pick up, many of them are there as warnings to warn us what we are eating might be bad. Bitter is a great example of this, for the most part people avoided bitter foods because they were associated with natural food that were not necessarily great for us. Over time, as we found foods safe to eat with bitter flavors, a taste for them developed. Sour could also indicate if a fruit for example may not have been ripe yet, yada, yada, yada..

Sweet is different. Sweet does not necessarily indicate the food is safe, but it does indicate the presence of sugars in the food which are required from the body in order for it to survive. Thus the desire to find food that is sweet is very strong, because in essence that is what our bodies are looking for when it is hungry. There is really no "nutritional" benefit from the other flavors (well, salty can be argued of course but we don't go looking for large quantities of salt to eat), only sweet is this strong becuase it targets the flavor of sugars which our bodies must have and is what we are designed to crave.

So, while we can detect other flavors with our tongue, the brain is most "pleased" with sweet because that is how our brain was rigged to be from an evolutionary standpoint.

It's not just BBQ where sweet is popular. Sweet is popular in any kind of food, and more satisfying to people than the other flavors.

This is why people find eating foods with high fructose corn syrup so tasty. The more sweet something is, the more pleasurable it is.

SmokinOkie
04-01-2010, 09:40 AM
Good question, impossible to get an answer.

Why? Because only 1 to 2% of the judges even read or comment in a forum and the majority never visit them so they'll decide what flavors they like on their own -- there's no KCBS definition on how to judge/score, it's only what the judge is taught in class.

A lot of judges took a class for a local contest and tend to just judge once a year. Few of them travel to multiple contests. And sometimes the judges that do travel come up with their own method of judging what's "good".

I base this on judging almost 30 contests and asking lots of questions of judges as well as competing for 5 years. The above is what they tell me, agree or disagree, it's what I've heard.

So, we're left to guess what flavors win, what doesn't.

I didn't take Bunny's class, but I learned the same way... Judge it as presented.

A lot of judges I ask, don't know what that means.

I like all flavors and if I have to say, I do like sweet. But as a judge, I judge each piece as presented. If it's spicey, does the spicy blend well or is it so overpowering I only taste one flavor? Same for sweet, if it's candy sweet and it's overpowering, can I taste anything else?

The ones that score well always have a range of flavors, a balance, or layers of flavor.

But... I had a discussion with Bunny recently. I think judges are left to their own for deciding what "scores" and until that changes, we'll think what we think in the forums, but the average judge won't tell us.

The confusing part for you?

When I ask most judges how they "judge" I get a different answer from everyone. It's almost never the same.

Russ

Lake Dogs
04-01-2010, 09:43 AM
It's an effect of human evolution. Recall that until very, very, very recently in human evolution, we had NO idea what was in the food, and only had sight, smell, touch and taste to go on, with taste being the major contributor and last line of defense of knowing what we ate was good for us or not.

While we have 5 basic flavors our tongues can pick up, many of them are there as warnings to warn us what we are eating might be bad. Bitter is a great example of this, for the most part people avoided bitter foods because they were associated with natural food that were not necessarily great for us. Over time, as we found foods safe to eat with bitter flavors, a taste for them developed. Sour could also indicate if a fruit for example may not have been ripe yet, yada, yada, yada..

Sweet is different. Sweet does not necessarily indicate the food is safe, but it does indicate the presence of sugars in the food which are required from the body in order for it to survive. Thus the desire to find food that is sweet is very strong, because in essence that is what our bodies are looking for when it is hungry. There is really no "nutritional" benefit from the other flavors, only sweet becuase it targets the flavor of sugars which our bodies must have.

So, while we can detect other flavors with our tongue, the brain is most "pleased" with sweet because that is how our brain was rigged to be from an evolutionary standpoint.

^^^^ Unequivocal proof that Cajun's ain't evolved!!!

:shock:

bigabyte
04-01-2010, 10:34 AM
^^^^ Unequivocal proof that Cajun's ain't evolved!!!

:shock:
:pound::clap2::heh::crazy:

big blue bbq
04-01-2010, 10:50 AM
I just went thru a judge class and it was taught to judge as presented. As a personal preference, I am a dry bbq fan. When I first started competing my bbq had some spice to it as well. It would start sweet and then you would get a little taste of spice coming thru. We did ok in a few meats in some competitions, but never really in the top half of the overall scores. I went to two cooking classes last year trying to learn more what is being looked for, and that also is why I took the judges class. I did one comp after the last class I attended and cooked much sweeter than I have ever before and got two calls. I intend to judge a few comps a year and compete in about 10 and will continue to cook more on the sweet side, but you do have to have the balance.

Could part of the equation be that when we go to the judging class they try to invite a team that does pretty well on the circuit to do the cooking and this is being presented (maybe not on purpose, but if that is all you get to taste) as "how bbq should be at a comp"? If that is the case, many judges that may already like some things sweeter in the personal eating may also be looking for this as the standard since that is what they had in the judging class?

Just my $.02.

larry

armor
04-01-2010, 11:22 AM
Recently watched and recorded a segment of Alton Brown's "Good Eats" that was titled "The Ballad of Salty and Sweet" that really gives some insight into this question. I would have to watch again to post anything that he said but until I have the opportunity you may be able to watch online. If not Food Network perhaps Hulu has it.

Forrest
04-01-2010, 11:42 AM
I've noticed that when I am TRULY hungry, apples taste sweeter. I have also noticed that when I am VERY dehydrated, water tastes slightly sweet. As such I do agree with others who have posted about the sweet/brain correlation. I personally don't have a sweet tooth and can skip dessert and sweets without batting an eyelash, but I do enjoy the sweetness in savory foods.

On the other side of the coin, I ate some spares recently that had so much sugar on them that the caramelized sugar stuck to my teeth as I tried to eat. That was over the top sweet!

ovrkl1947
04-01-2010, 11:50 AM
Sweet is the first profile your palate senses, then heat and heavy spices, and the last or umami is last. So in imho sweet is more impressive to most. Spicy can turn a judge off. Umami is just damn good. Just mho.

HandsomeSwede
04-02-2010, 07:09 AM
Why does bacon and breakfast sausage taste better drizzled with maple syrup?

ThomEmery
04-02-2010, 08:05 AM
My next contest I think I'm going to marinate my chicken in corn syrup, rub it with turbinado sugar, smoke it with maple and glaze it with honey.

KCBS Judges card reads
"Too sweet"
:)

ThomEmery
04-02-2010, 08:07 AM
Did a practice cook with my new teammate
He is saying what are you doin with all that brown sugar?

SmokinOkie
04-02-2010, 11:03 AM
...Could part of the equation be that when we go to the judging class they try to invite a team that does pretty well on the circuit to do the cooking and this is being presented (maybe not on purpose, but if that is all you get to taste) as "how bbq should be at a comp"?
larry

Probably not. I've been invited to cook for a number of classes and while I'd like to turn in comp food (to get some feedback and train the judges) it's pretty tough. Trying to turn out boxes for 75 judges in the same 30 min window is really @#$%!# and elbows.

At no time has KCBS given me instructions on how to cook the food. What they do give me are rules to follow for building the boxes (red tip lettuce in one, 5 ribs in another, brisket slices not sliced all the way through). Direction is more for the rules, than the taste.

That being said, I wish they could figure out a way to train the judges in all classes the same way about what good Q is, but I'm not sure anyone in KCBS (us included) will ever be able to define that to the point you can teach something for which is inherently subjective

PorkQPine
04-02-2010, 11:41 AM
I have judged a lot of KCBS events but at none of these, west coast, have I ever seen something like I saw on a BBQ contest show on TV where one of the teams actually poured brown sugar and honey over the ribs after they were cooked. They got a call and I was amazed that these super sweet ribs got such a high score. Perhaps sweetness is a regional thing like sweet tea. Here in Calif. we don't have sweet tea, except at McDonalds, and the BBQ has tones of sweetness but not coma sweet. Balance is my key word in judging, too much of any one flavor is a markdown.

mcmiller74
04-02-2010, 12:29 PM
This question has many similarities to the pepsi challenge and the new coke disaster. There is a great chapter in a book I read not too long ago. I think it was in Blink. Basically when just tasting the human mind/tongue is drawn to sweet. That is why pepsi won the pepsi challenge. Coke responded with a sweeter version only to have it crash and burn. It turns out that while the first taste of sweet is preferred when it comes to drinking a full body of pop or entire bbq meal at home the sweetest version isn't as preferred.

olewarthog
04-02-2010, 12:44 PM
I've taken a training class (not KCBS) & judged in a grand total of 1 comp so take the following with a huge block of salt. Like some others said, I was taught to judge each entry as presented not against how my grand-daddy make Que.

I am not a fan of sweet Que. When I make Que, I like it tangy with a bit of sweet & heat at the end. I don't eat at many BBQ restaurants because it's almost always too sweet for my taste.

All that being said, when you are judging you're not sitting down to eat a plate full of each entry. You are judging the entry on just a bite or two. Without a doubt, sweet grabs your taste buds quicker than a tangy flavor (or at least it does for me) While I may prefer the tangy profile, it is sweetness that makes the bolder first impression & thus tends to score higher. Just like with heat, you can go overboard with sweetness. However the average person will tolerate too sweet much better than too hot or too tangy.

barbefunkoramaque
04-02-2010, 01:19 PM
I too love the savory sauces but we should not discriminate against one or the other. Just two different ways of sauces.

I move the savory and can drink angelos which is derived mainly from their Rub (mostly lawrys), heavy on the beef drippings and v-8 and is mostly acidic mellowed out by the beef taste instead of sugar.

I explain it like this... I like the savory and do not like it BOTH ways like some judges do.

Its like there are two types of guys:
39302
savory and robust american style

39303
saucy type of style

Now both are supposedly real men and I don't see the chance of the Duke having a tell all boom or press release he is anything less than a man.

For those that like a little sugar in their tank there is the other kind of man, still a man and from interview to interview always insisting he is a saucy dancing type of guy... er salsa, sorry.

Please so that's that.



This is a question that has been stuck in my craw for a while now and I haven't gotten a satisfying answer yet. The BBQ I grew up on was savory and spicy. Most of the BBQ joints I've been to serve savory BBQ. The judges I've talked to say that sauces shouldn't hide the flavor of the meat.

Meat isn't sweet. But inevitably the entries that win are coated in a sugary sauce that most people say they wouldn't eat at home because it's too rich and too sweet.

So why does sweet win?

JD McGee
04-02-2010, 02:29 PM
Tip of the day..."Cook Regionally"...you ain't cookin' for yourself...you're cookin' for the local judges...:cool: