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tmcmaster
02-25-2010, 01:07 AM
Greetings all!

I am in a bit of a sticky wicket... I have a job in July with a whole hog. Now, that's very good news except that I have never done a whole hog on an off-set before. I would like to do the job since it is family and they have many connections that would be many future jobs. So here is/are my question(s)...

I would like to do a 'trial run' with a whole hog in April, and would like to know if anyone has:
A) Done a whole hog on an off set?
B ) Some tips, tricks or secrets they would like to share?
C) If so inclined, be willing to came to my place in April and sort of 'tutor' me on the finer points of it?

Thanks!

Lake Dogs
02-25-2010, 06:57 AM
Divemaster did a whole hog on a Lang 60 a while back:

http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showthread.php?t=64701&highlight=whole+hog

smokinit
02-25-2010, 07:15 AM
Not hard at all what are you cooking on.

southernsmoker
02-25-2010, 09:48 AM
We do whole hogs on the Lang, worst drawback I find is ya can't eat the skin, some folks want that crispy cracklin's.

tmcmaster
02-25-2010, 07:59 PM
Not hard at all what are you cooking on.

My off set (Priscilla). Her previous life was an unused 275 gallon tank. Stick/coal burner.

We do whole hogs on the Lang, worst drawback I find is ya can't eat the skin, some folks want that crispy cracklin's.
Hmmmm... That was what I was really looking forward to...

smokinit
02-25-2010, 08:02 PM
My off set (Priscilla). Her previous life was an unused 275 gallon tank. Stick/coal burner.


Hmmmm... That was what I was really looking forward to...
That is what I did my first in can you get her up to 280 or so?

BBQ_MAFIA
02-25-2010, 09:20 PM
This thread shows how I cooked a pig in my Lang 60.
If you scroll through the thread you will see pics also.

Good luck and I hope this helps.

http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showthread.php?t=63032&highlight=whole+hog%2C+pig (http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showthread.php?t=63032&highlight=whole+hog%2C+pig)

tmcmaster
02-25-2010, 11:03 PM
That is what I did my first in can you get her up to 280 or so?

I have never had to run her that hot... I am doing a practice pig in April, though... I guess we'll find out then... She holds 250 no problem, though...

This thread shows how I cooked a pig in my Lang 60.
If you scroll through the thread you will see pics also.

Good luck and I hope this helps.

http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showthread.php?t=63032&highlight=whole+hog%2C+pig

Awesome! Thanks!

tmcmaster
03-02-2010, 12:23 AM
bump

monty3777
03-02-2010, 07:09 AM
how big is the hog? I have an offset and I cook 100 lb hogs (big enough to cook for ~ 100 people). I begin with the head side closest to the fire - the head acts as a heat barrier. If the shoulders are cooking faster than the hams (I'm thinking that my shoulders get to 190* around the time my hams are 170* I simply turn the hog and put the hams closest to the heat and they both usually finish right around the same time. If you want a pig picking then the temps will need to be around 200*, however, if the timing doesn't work out and the temps are closer to 170 + you can slice or get some cleavers and cut the pork finely and that will be a lot like pulled pork. however, if you do chop into fine pieces it may dry out a little quicker.

I think that the best thing to do is just cook one. Pay attention to the temps of your hams and shoulders and everything else will be fine. I cook on the back and the rest of the meat will be really juicy because it will cook in its own juices.

tmcmaster
03-02-2010, 10:21 PM
how big is the hog? I have an offset and I cook 100 lb hogs (big enough to cook for ~ 100 people). I begin with the head side closest to the fire - the head acts as a heat barrier. If the shoulders are cooking faster than the hams (I'm thinking that my shoulders get to 190* around the time my hams are 170* I simply turn the hog and put the hams closest to the heat and they both usually finish right around the same time. If you want a pig picking then the temps will need to be around 200*, however, if the timing doesn't work out and the temps are closer to 170 + you can slice or get some cleavers and cut the pork finely and that will be a lot like pulled pork. however, if you do chop into fine pieces it may dry out a little quicker.

I think that the best thing to do is just cook one. Pay attention to the temps of your hams and shoulders and everything else will be fine. I cook on the back and the rest of the meat will be really juicy because it will cook in its own juices.
The cooking area used to be a virgin 275 gallon tank, so 100 pounder should fit nicely. I am planning to do a 'practice' pig for family/friends before the one for the paying customers.

Thanks for the tips!!

CivilWarBBQ
03-03-2010, 01:06 AM
I don't want to be contrary here, but there is no way a 100 lb skin-on whole hog is going to feed 100 people! Meat yield on whole hog is quite low, something in the neighborhood of 30 percent. (Remember you have lots of skin, bones, skull, hoofs, etc.) The smaller the hog, the lower the yield percentage, so the bigger the better.

When catering for a large party with a hog specified, we do one for show, but make sure we have enough butts cooked to ensure we'll have all the meat we need. Often you can simply break up your butts inside the carcass if people want to be served out of the smoker - your average Joe won't know the difference. If your client is a purist, serve the VIPs the hog and the bulk of the guests the butts. Bottom line is whole hog is much more labor intensive for you to serve and typically costs you more than cooking shoulders, so you should plan and price accordingly.

tmcmaster
03-03-2010, 04:49 AM
I don't want to be contrary here, but there is no way a 100 lb skin-on whole hog is going to feed 100 people! Meat yield on whole hog is quite low, something in the neighborhood of 30 percent. (Remember you have lots of skin, bones, skull, hoofs, etc.) The smaller the hog, the lower the yield percentage, so the bigger the better.

When catering for a large party with a hog specified, we do one for show, but make sure we have enough butts cooked to ensure we'll have all the meat we need. Often you can simply break up your butts inside the carcass if people want to be served out of the smoker - your average Joe won't know the difference. If your client is a purist, serve the VIPs the hog and the bulk of the guests the butts. Bottom line is whole hog is much more labor intensive for you to serve and typically costs you more than cooking shoulders, so you should plan and price accordingly.
The client actually wants a few extra butts as well as MOINK balls and a bunch of sides. The 100 pounds, plus the others should easily cover the 100 heads. But, they were the ones that suggested the 100 pounder...

I do appreciated the tips, though... Planning a practice pig next month, though... will post pron.

monty3777
03-03-2010, 07:04 AM
I should add that we built a special rack that is removable - we cook the hog on the rack - that allows us to turn the hog and take it out of the cooker. I think if you don't have a rack then it probably wouldn't work to turn the hog. The final temps we look for on hams and butt is the typical ~ 200*

tmcmaster
03-03-2010, 06:11 PM
I should add that we built a special rack that is removable - we cook the hog on the rack - that allows us to turn the hog and take it out of the cooker. I think if you don't have a rack then it probably wouldn't work to turn the hog. The final temps we look for on hams and butt is the typical ~ 200*

Yeah, I just talked with my welder friend about fabricating one next week. This is one expensive addiction...:razz: