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Dan - 3eyzbbq
02-23-2010, 03:08 PM
I have heard this come up more and more, so I figured I'd throw it out there for discussion.

If you take a BBQ class from somebody teaching you their techniques of competition bbq is it wrong to share the info you have collected with somebody that was not in the class?

If so, where do you draw the line? Can you share with your teamates or spouse or your neighbor that never competes? Or is it that your not supposed to share with somebody that knows how to use the info (like a fellow competitor).

My take? I'm thinking that once you take a class, those techniques become yours and you can do whatever you want with them. Now if a handout is distributed wth pics and it states not to pass it on or copy it, then you should respect that. But to not verbally share the info or your notes, seems wrong should the person who took the class want to do that.

What do you all think?

Jacked UP BBQ
02-23-2010, 03:23 PM
I am a firm believer in you still have to produce the product, so I say yes you can share whatever you would like. There are really no truly hidden secrets out there, some just think they have them!

Buster Dog BBQ
02-23-2010, 03:27 PM
Out of respect to those who put on the class, I do not think it is fair to share that information with someone else. Sure some can't keep a secret, but what's the incentive for class instructors if they see/hear someone blabbing about their techniques? Now if you take their technique and change it enough to the point it's yours then I suppose it's probably ok then if you so chose to do so.

monty3777
02-23-2010, 03:30 PM
I have taken 2 classes. Myron's and Scottie's. Basically, I believe that a person should respect the wishes of the instructor. I do believe that I have paid for the info, and it's mine to do with what I please. However, if part of the understanding of the class is that I don't share specifics, I'll respect that. After all, I can always back out of the class if I don't like the "rules."

In addition, Myron is in business, so the cost of doing business is that your trade secrets aren't secrets once you sell them! However, Scottie is raising money for his foundation. I would not want to be responsible for costing him an additional $500 entry fee/donation because I gave away the notes to his class.

This is an interesting thread!

early mornin' smokin'
02-23-2010, 03:32 PM
giving away the exact notes, not cool, but telling people what you've learned, no harm done imho. Somebody may tell you how to do something, but actually seeing it done, and being there to help is worth a lot more when it comes to learning something....with that being said, start sharing some of these secrets!!!!

Ron_L
02-23-2010, 03:33 PM
I agree with Buster Dog. The guys teaching the classes are guys just like us, except that they have had some success and are willing to share it for a fee. Freely sharing what you learned in the class would be taking money out of their pockets.

HBMTN
02-23-2010, 03:33 PM
I'm with you 100% Dan, same also like if you go on tv using muffin pans you can not get upset if next year you see people using muffin pans. If you don't want others to know then keep it a secret.

Jacked UP BBQ
02-23-2010, 03:33 PM
I always wondered about the entire technique class thing. I cannot imagine them being worth the money, google is free? This is just my opinion!

widespread
02-23-2010, 03:34 PM
I don't share too much with anyone but teammates. Maybe overall ideas, temps, stuff like that, but not rubs, sauces, or presentation. I figure that the cook teaching the class has alot of time and money tied up in developing their techniques. I'm robbing them of possible future income if I tell everyone everything they do.
All that being said, when are you giving a rib class? :-D:-D:eusa_clap

Jacked UP BBQ
02-23-2010, 03:34 PM
Dan since you are on the Topic, what did you learn????????

Jorge
02-23-2010, 03:36 PM
Rod and Johnny were upfront and said something like "You paid for the info, it's yours to do with as you please.". There was also a suggestion that since we'd paid for it, we might not want to give it away for free. THAT WAS TONGUE IN CHEEK.

They charged a fair price, and gave up the info. I appreciated that and I came away with some new ideas and a new way to look at what I'd done in the past. Out of respect for both Rod and Johnny, I've chosen not to share it. Rod's still teaching classes and I have no interest in having a negative impact on his income.

My .02

armor
02-23-2010, 03:37 PM
I agree with some of what you both said but as for myself if I spent my hard earned money to take a class and someone wanted to know what I learned at that class I think I could possibly have a hard time with giving up the info That individual could attend the same class as well. Something to think about though.

ique
02-23-2010, 03:38 PM
I have heard this come up more and more, so I figured I'd throw it out there for discussion.

If you take a BBQ class from somebody teaching you their techniques of competition bbq is it wrong to share the info you have collected with somebody that was not in the class?

I think you you should feel free to share the newly learned techniques with your team-mates. But I don't think posting the technique on a public forum would be cool.

Jacked UP BBQ
02-23-2010, 03:40 PM
All I know is when I went to IQUE's cooking class he used a lot of celery root. Don't tell anyone!

Jaybird
02-23-2010, 03:42 PM
In the classes I have taken, the instructors let us all know their thoughts on this matter. I respected and stayed true to these thoughts.
I don't know why you would just give info away but if your teamate was not in the class it's kind of hard to hide it from them anyway...and not that you would want to.

I have always wondered, if you took a class and became quite successful in competitions using what you learned, can you now teach a class yourself?

Ron_L
02-23-2010, 03:42 PM
I'm with you 100% Dan, same also like if you go on tv using muffin pans you can not get upset if next year you see people using muffin pans. If you don't want others to know then keep it a secret.

Showing a technique on TV is completely different. The TV show is broadcast freely (or with a monthly cable fee) to millions. You're right that exposing something like that on TV and then being surprised when it is used is silly, but it is different from someone paying for a class and then freely distributing the information.

chopshop
02-23-2010, 03:57 PM
i say you dont give the info out....you sell it at a discount! haha

Rub
02-23-2010, 04:17 PM
I realize that people are going to ultimately do what they want to with the information, but I am going to ask that they keep it for themselves. Some will respect that, some won't; I'm not going to stress over it.

Rich Parker
02-23-2010, 04:32 PM
I realize that people are going to ultimately do what they want to with the information, but I am going to ask that they keep it for themselves. Some will respect that, some won't; I'm not going to stress over it.

Good outlook! The good people will respect you for that and keep it to themselves and the others will do what they do.

bam
02-23-2010, 05:28 PM
If I buy a cook-book I can loan it out or share a recipe it's mine I paid for it.

HBMTN
02-23-2010, 06:05 PM
I think by the very nature of paying $750 to go to a class that it would not be wise to go give all of the info to people you compete against, that would be counter productive as you are probably going to the class to get an edge on the competition. I also agree with Ique that to go post what you learned somewhere would not be cool either. But if you are at a competition and someone help you by giving you a tip, and you can help them with something you learned at a class then you should be able to tell them the tip or two that you learned in the class. You don't have to tell them where you learned it I don't guess.

Jacked UP BBQ
02-23-2010, 07:54 PM
Doesn't matter where you learn, learning is what it's all about. Like they say a little knowledge is dangerous. I am a believer in helping and giving out info from all I have gathered over the years, whether I payed for it or picked it up myself. Do you think the guy teaching the class invented the method or flavors they are teaching? If you wlak in my site while we are tuning in or anytime you want I will tell you anything we do, I will also give credit where credit is due. If I got an idea from someone I would say yea and I use this because I learned it from so and so cook book or this ones class. There is nothing wrong with sharing knowledge, it is actually a GREAT thing whether paid for or not, the end. I just drank a lot of NYQUIL!

Dan - 3eyzbbq
02-23-2010, 09:19 PM
Doesn't matter where you learn, learning is what it's all about. Like they say a little knowledge is dangerous. I am a believer in helping and giving out info from all I have gathered over the years, whether I payed for it or picked it up myself. Do you think the guy teaching the class invented the method or flavors they are teaching? If you wlak in my site while we are tuning in or anytime you want I will tell you anything we do, I will also give credit where credit is due. If I got an idea from someone I would say yea and I use this because I learned it from so and so cook book or this ones class. There is nothing wrong with sharing knowledge, it is actually a GREAT thing whether paid for or not, the end. I just drank a lot of NYQUIL!

I'll have a "representative" at your site in Little Rock. He will have a note pad and video camera but I promise, he won't get in the way :icon_devil

HoDeDo
02-23-2010, 10:45 PM
It is an interesting topic. I think the teammate question is really a no-brainer right? IF you are cooking with someone, you will both know what each other is doing... or you arent an effective team.

But as far as knowledge in general: I have learned from the HoDeDos, Strawberry Hill Smokers, Sparkle Plenty (the original Sparky, and Rick both), Pig Newton, The Slabs, 4 Men and a Pig, you name it.. other names like Pork Pullin Plowboys (have to include todd, even if we are teammates, right?), KC Can Crew, Mokan Meatheads, are all in there too. I've had alot of learning over the years in my comp. bbq.

Anyone that asks a question, will always get a straight answer from me. I have no problem draggin ya into the trailer to demo a technique, share a rub, etc. IT happens all the time. Heck, my wife even more so than I do -- I think she holds box class at almost every comp. LOL I do that because folks did it for me. I have gotten guidance from folks whenever I asked...and sometimes when I didnt. I like to think that some folks have scored better thanks to my input. That is what it is all about it! I know alot of folks helped me get to where I am today, competitively.

I think Matt asked "why a class, when you can google".... I think there is a deliniation to be drawn. The value of the class is this: You get the full package in one place, in context, and in a proven process. That process is key, as is the context. Googling a technique, does not put it in context with the other three things you are managing at a contest,nor does it plug it into the overall process for you. To build that takes time... lots of cooking to build the processes and overall cook successes. The Comp class is a new phenom... with more money out there, folks want to shorten the learning curve and get a shot at those $$ and the rush of the name call "now". without building the process themselves. So yes, while you can google the techniques, putting them together in a cohesive package is the value of the class.

I answer questions all the time, but they are specific to a certain topic, or rough spot someone might be having.... I dont provide the whole picture end to end in context. I would expect a fee for that. I have over 15 years putting it all together. that is where the extra value is extracted.

Having said that, most classes I have taught were not for competitors. I have 6 classes and a handful of demos under my belt, and none were for competitors. And the prices reflect that: $50-$250 head depending on the topic, lenght of time, etc. IF you pay $500 or $750 for a class, there is an expectation that you will do better with what you have learned. To me that is a whole new level of competition... besting yourself. I think it takes alot to have the guts to do the teaching of a "competition" class - the people in your class are putting thier trust in you, (and thier $$); I am sure the instructors genuinely want to see the class pay off with success on the student's part. I know I would feel like I broke that trust of my student, or "undersold" -- If that student didnt show any improvement. It takes alot to be able to teach that, and teach it effectively. My hats off to Rod, Johnny, Mike D., MM, that teach the specifically comp classes... it is alot of pressure to perform - and to do it, and see the successes thier students have, is a testament to the champions they are.

KuyasKitchen
02-23-2010, 10:52 PM
If I spend $500+ on a class, that information is mine to use as I please (with the exception of any handouts, videos, copyrightable information). And, knowing me, I will do what I please with it.

That said, if I paid $500 for that information, I'm not going to hand it out for free or post it on the web. I PAID $500 FOR IT!

Share tips with friends? Sure. Try variations and post my results? Sure. Post directly? Hell no. Want that, it's $500 to the teacher.

monty3777
02-23-2010, 11:18 PM
with more money out there, folks want to shorten the learning curve and get a shot at those $$ and the rush of the name call "now". without building the process themselves.



Interesting thoughts, as usual! I have put some thought into why I have paid money to take classes. I'm not sure that it has much to do with money or calls - though I enjoy both and would like to enjoy more in the future. I took my first class after 5 years of learning to smoke/cook on my own. What I wanted was to do exactly what you describe in the rest of your post - it was time for me to link all the various parts I had learned into a cohesive whole (or as you put it, to place things into a context). To me that's the real value of taking a class - whether it's a BBQ cook class or a seminar on the Bible. The point for me is to find connections that I had missed on my own.

As with anything else in my life, I have come to believe that a skill cannot be learned in isolation. That's why I will continue to take classes every year despite whether my notes lead me to perform better in a competition.

O.K., it's late and I'm rambling.

suprfast
02-23-2010, 11:35 PM
If you pay for it, its yours. If they want to you keep it secret they should pay you to attend.

Its no different than going to college. I pay for an education to show it off and teach others. Its not like we are working at area51.

Video recording then reselling or distributing it would be wrong. If you are good enough to retain the information to give to the next person you obviously have a good understanding of the process.

KC_Bobby
02-24-2010, 12:02 AM
If you are good enough to retain the information to give to the next person you obviously have a good understanding of the process.

Along those lines ... that's what would scare me. I'm sure most of us played the game telephone in kindergarten and the message the 3rd or 4th person got was never what the 1st person said.

I'm taking my first official class in a few weeks and I'm stoked. I've had a good share of field training from some great teams, but I'm excited to see what light bulbs go on during the class.

suprfast
02-24-2010, 12:40 AM
Another thing to note is most of these people received their initial experience somewhere, from someone. Whether it be a minion method or a dry rub, its not like they invented something.

Crash
02-24-2010, 02:12 AM
IMHO....Pay it forward....but dont tell everything you learned at a class. Hell, you paid for the info, why share it with teams that might kick your arse at a competition.

As for sharing class info with teamates, how do you not do that? Unless your teammates compete on other teams throughout the year, how do you really hide that info?

If other teams that you compete against wanted that info, they would have ponied up the $ and gone to school.

Again, just one dudes opinion here.

CivilWarBBQ
02-24-2010, 05:43 AM
This is a question of integrity - just like when your employer teaches you their trade secrets and asks you not to reveal them. Everybody knows there is no real way to prevent you from blabbing, so it's up to your own sense of loyalty not to.

In the long run, it is for the best if we keep the knowledge learned at BBQ classes to ourselves and perhaps our immediate teammates. Otherwise three things happen:
1) The value of the information we paid for is lessened
2) Instructors learn to hold crucial information back to protect themselves
3) We lose the respect of someone we thought highly enough of to pay them for a class

monty3777
02-24-2010, 07:56 AM
2) Instructors learn to hold crucial information back to protect themselves


This is what I suspect will happen now that so many folks are taking classes and passing along information.

Jacked UP BBQ
02-24-2010, 08:08 AM
This is what I suspect will happen now that so many folks are taking classes and passing along information.


Are we talking about cooking some food or coming up with a cure for aids?:twisted:

monty3777
02-24-2010, 08:14 AM
Are we talking about cooking some food or coming up with a cure for aids?:twisted:

Oh, I guess I wasn't clear. I MEANT to write "coming up with a cure for AIDS." My bad.
8)

U2CANQUE
02-24-2010, 08:20 AM
Anyone that asks a question, will always get a straight answer from me. I have no problem draggin ya into the trailer to demo a technique, share a rub, etc. IT happens all the time. Heck, my wife even more so than I do -- I think she holds box class at almost every comp.

I have witnessed it first hand, and I know that the team that was behind up at Oinktoberfest were still talking about the chicken lesson that they have got from you....

it is also fun to watch the parsley parties.....talk about a group experience.....

Matt....I dont really hide anythign either, but, I appreciated it a lot that last year at Rochester that you even asked to come into the site to hide from your crew.....though I am open with sharing, I hope that a person is prepared to "glove up" when they come in since I am usually cooking alone....:biggrin:

Ron_L
02-24-2010, 08:26 AM
If I buy a cook-book I can loan it out or share a recipe it's mine I paid for it.

That's a good point, Huck. There is a difference, however. The book is copyright material. Yes, you can loan it to a friend, but legally you can't copy a page out of it and give it others, and you can post recipes from the book on a public forum without attribution (and some publishers require express permission).

In my mind the material in the class is similar. We are paying for the information for our personal use and I don't see a problem sharing it with team mates and friends, but I don't think publishing it on a public forum would be fair to the instructor. In most cases the instructor isn't showing any basic techniques that aren't public knowledge (foiling rib, injecting butts, etc.) but the details of how they do it and what they do differently are unique and not public knowledge. Taking it further, in most cases these folks are friends or at least fellow BBQer and I think they deserve some respect for sharing their techniques to help folks who could eventually beat them out of a cash prize.

If too many people start sharing what they learn in these classes freely it wouldn't surprise me if instructors started asking their students to sign an agreement before taking the class that prohibits that. Agreements like that are common in seminars, etc. in the business world where sensitive or confidential information is presented.

Plowboy
02-24-2010, 08:34 AM
Another thing to note is most of these people received their initial experience somewhere, from someone. Whether it be a minion method or a dry rub, its not like they invented something.

I don't understand this statement. How do you know they haven't invented something?

There ARE new & unique ideas out there. I've been working on some chicken techniques on the FEC-100 that I've never heard anyone do before, neither has Fast Eddy or other top FEC-100 cooks I've talked to. Anyone who has seen KC Can Crew cook chicken knows that the guy is doing something unique.


And contrary to other statements made in this thread, there ARE secrets out there, too. I know of a team that is doing something just this year that would amaze most pellet cooks. Per the team, I'm the only person outside of the team that knows... and it will stay that way.

I think all of these instructors know that once they give it out, it is out there. You just have to assume that it will be shared. You can't control it, so why worry about it.

Jacked UP BBQ
02-24-2010, 08:51 AM
I guess you can consider them secrets and only a few know if nobody communicates, but I am sure there are other people doing it. I did some things in the past that I am sure no one has ever done, I will never do most of them again. I did muffin pan chicken in 2006 at our first comp ever, we did good with it, never stuck with it because we changed our ways. I have some sick crazy ideas this year for my chicken, I hope to god it works, I think I created it but I am sure someone else out there has done it.

Here is something we experimented with in the past, I will share it because we do not do it anymore. We airbrushed smoke rings on with food paint, it looked farking amazing, we don't do it anymore because it stains your fingers and takes to long and the food gets ice cold. But it is the best looking thing you will ever see. There is an idea that I thought I came up with, but I doubt it! Anyone else want to throw soething out there!

HoDeDo
02-24-2010, 08:53 AM
I agree with you 100%, I had narrowed my scope to some assumptions about Comp BBQ classes. I figure you dont take one unless you are trying to improve your comp scores, meaning getting a walk or money. But I agree 100% with your statement. Linking the parts is the key! Thanks for taking it up a notch and pulling that out of my long winded diatribe :-P
Interesting thoughts, as usual! I have put some thought into why I have paid money to take classes. I'm not sure that it has much to do with money or calls - though I enjoy both and would like to enjoy more in the future. I took my first class after 5 years of learning to smoke/cook on my own. What I wanted was to do exactly what you describe in the rest of your post - it was time for me to link all the various parts I had learned into a cohesive whole (or as you put it, to place things into a context). To me that's the real value of taking a class - whether it's a BBQ cook class or a seminar on the Bible. The point for me is to find connections that I had missed on my own.

As with anything else in my life, I have come to believe that a skill cannot be learned in isolation. That's why I will continue to take classes every year despite whether my notes lead me to perform better in a competition.

O.K., it's late and I'm rambling.

Jacked UP BBQ
02-24-2010, 08:54 AM
Matt....I dont really hide anythign either, but, I appreciated it a lot that last year at Rochester that you even asked to come into the site to hide from your crew.....though I am open with sharing, I hope that a person is prepared to "glove up" when they come in since I am usually cooking alone....:biggrin:

Thanks, I am respectful to peoples wishes. :twisted:

kickassbbq
02-24-2010, 09:19 AM
I have been putting on Basic BBQ Classes (not competition) for 5 years. I tell everyone that attends to tell anybody they want what they have learned.

I fill EVERY Class!!! 75% of new attendees are from referrals.

I ain't got no stinkin' secrets.

It's BBQ guys. Not Rocket Science. Don't be so serious about this stuff!!!

And, if somebody doesn't want their stuff shared, they should not tell ANYONE how they do it. And, if you paid for a Class, that information now belongs to you. Do with it what you want.

PARTY!!!!!!!!!!! That's just my opinion and I really don't know Jack Squat!!

bam
02-24-2010, 10:23 AM
I have been putting on Basic BBQ Classes (not competition) for 5 years. I tell everyone that attends to tell anybody they want what they have learned.

I fill EVERY Class!!! 75% of new attendees are from referrals.

I ain't got no stinkin' secrets.

It's BBQ guys. Not Rocket Science. Don't be so serious about this stuff!!!

And, if somebody doesn't want their stuff shared, they should not tell ANYONE how they do it. And, if you paid for a Class, that information now belongs to you. Do with it what you want.

PARTY!!!!!!!!!!! That's just my opinion and I really don't know Jack Squat!!

Whisper down the lane by the time I get the info I'll need to take the class. A print-out should not be printed on a forum.

monty3777
02-24-2010, 10:35 AM
What do you all think about note swapping? I have been asked to swap notes with someone who has taken another class. In that instance it certainly is not giving away secrets - it's trading. Nor is it the same as putting things out on a forum. Just throwing that out there FWIW. Again, Scottie's notes I won't share because that could take money away from the Foundation.

Alexa RnQ
02-24-2010, 10:39 AM
There is one more component to the mix that comes after class -- each cook has to fully own the process through replication and then sublimating it into their own cooking process. We've seen a lot of people take classes, and while there is broad-based improvement there are a relatively smaller number of people who break out of the pack with that knowledge. It's not that they weren't all exposed to the same information; there is something else that contributes.

We have remained respectful to our teacher's expressed feeling that particular details remain among paid class attendees. We follow his tradition in that when giving advice, we endeavor to do what he did -- to help teach the questioner how to think about the BBQ process, which will make them a more skilled cook, not just a one-off smarter one.

Capn Kev
02-24-2010, 10:55 AM
It's BBQ guys. Not Rocket Science. Don't be so serious about this stuff!!!


Using my "Mixon-ary", I believe Myron's response would be...

"It's not just damn BBQ son, when you're trying ta get ya m***** F***in' ass paid!"

I'll chime in here, and say... I'm expecting big things from the Plowboys class in March!! :lol::lol: ...and I ain't sharing it with anyone other than my team. :wink:

Jacked UP BBQ
02-24-2010, 10:58 AM
I will say one thing, it is a real shame when people go to classes and dupicate exactly what they were taught.

Capn Kev
02-24-2010, 11:11 AM
I will say one thing, it is a real shame when people go to classes and dupicate exactly what they were taught.

If someone thinks a class alone is the "magic bullet", then they're going at it with the wrong attitude. I go into a class hoping that the added knowledge will amplify my performance. After cooking for 20 years, I am a walking amalgamation of my prior experiences. I have specific goals I'm hoping to achieve. If the classes I take elevate me, even slightly, towards those goals, then the class is/was a success.

Learning BBQ is a process, not an event.

Buster Dog BBQ
02-24-2010, 11:14 AM
What do you all think about note swapping? I have been asked to swap notes with someone who has taken another class. In that instance it certainly is not giving away secrets - it's trading. Nor is it the same as putting things out on a forum. Just throwing that out there FWIW. Again, Scottie's notes I won't share because that could take money away from the Foundation.

Then I say buyer beware. I hope they take/took as good and detailed notes as you did.

I have compared some overview of a class with another competitor but they took the same class, just different date.

Ron_L
02-24-2010, 11:20 AM
What do you all think about note swapping? I have been asked to swap notes with someone who has taken another class. In that instance it certainly is not giving away secrets - it's trading. Nor is it the same as putting things out on a forum. Just throwing that out there FWIW. Again, Scottie's notes I won't share because that could take money away from the Foundation.

I want to make sure that i understand what you are asking. Were you and the person asking to swap notes in the same class, same day? If so, then you aren't giving the, anything that they couldn't have picked, but I would ask myself why they want to swap notes. Maybe they didn't do a good job of note taking and want to take advantage of your thoroughness?

If they weren't in the class that you paid for, then I would say no. Let them pay for the information just like you did.

Munkee's Pit
02-24-2010, 01:18 PM
I'll chime in here, and say... I'm expecting big things from the Plowboys class in March!! :lol::lol: ...and I ain't sharing it with anyone other than my team. :wink:

I totally agree. If a certain technique of bit of knowledge that you learn at a class pushes you further up the competition ladder, why would you want to openly share it with the people that you are competing against? That makes what you paid to learn null and void. If you want to stay at the same skill level as the rest of the pack then you might as well stay home and let somebody else have your seat at the class.

Dan - 3eyzbbq
02-24-2010, 01:30 PM
Jacked up- did you REALLY airbrush your food? If so, thats amazing, I want pics. If you didn't, well, you got me....

suprfast
02-24-2010, 01:30 PM
There are basics. Any one that wants to be a dick would say he learned how to light a fire, he learned how to keep the temps steady, he uses only a specific wood for flavor. I should have clarified a little better, but it was late. Yes, you can mix a bunch of ingredients and its yours, but dont get upset if someone else accidentally mixes the same ingredients and calls it theres. If a team didnt want their secrets to get out, DONT OFFER CLASSES.
Lawrence Livermore labs is on lock down because they dont want people to know what they are doing. Its for a reason.

I don't understand this statement. How do you know they haven't invented something?

There ARE new & unique ideas out there. I've been working on some chicken techniques on the FEC-100 that I've never heard anyone do before, neither has Fast Eddy or other top FEC-100 cooks I've talked to. Anyone who has seen KC Can Crew cook chicken knows that the guy is doing something unique.


And contrary to other statements made in this thread, there ARE secrets out there, too. I know of a team that is doing something just this year that would amaze most pellet cooks. Per the team, I'm the only person outside of the team that knows... and it will stay that way.

I think all of these instructors know that once they give it out, it is out there. You just have to assume that it will be shared. You can't control it, so why worry about it.

Jacked UP BBQ
02-24-2010, 01:36 PM
Jacked up- did you REALLY airbrush your food? If so, thats amazing, I want pics. If you didn't, well, you got me....


Dan it is VERY true. I don't know if I have any pics, but I will do it again just for you this weekend, maybe!

We like trying crazy stuff, enough of the crazy flavors we use to do, but we will continue with the innovative creations for appearance!

pahutchens
02-24-2010, 03:15 PM
When an instructor(s) state limitations on disclosure they should be respected.
Not everyone thinks that way to say don't share and assume that you paid for the training, so you wouldn't give away the information.
Sharing information doesn't devalue your learning, it can impact the instructors earnings. I say that with a double edge it can sway people in either direction to Go or not go to a class.
Musically as a parallel do you want to experience the original score, a decent cover or pharkin karaoke? :icon_smil
Each will have its own spin you'll hear the song.
When I was deep in my photography career I was taking seminars from other photographers to improve my Technique, almost everyone of them also sold a bus load of books and gizmo's. Plus some corporate sponsorship, all of those were the real money makers, the classes were ultimately very elaborate and helpful marketing tools.
I left using new techniques and shared them with my studio teams and we all bought the after class materials, and it rippled out with the latest thing since sliced bread
Take a class, tell your friends then more will Buy my: book, rub, grill, smoker, and bling with my name on it to advertise and maybe sign up for a class from the master themselves.
for the record I haven't taken any classes yet...

Rub
02-24-2010, 04:02 PM
Are we talking about cooking some food or coming up with a cure for aids?:twisted:
Anybody can cook some food. In my case I'm talking about helping my students improve and ultimately win.
If winning was simple, everyone would be doing it.

Capn Kev
02-24-2010, 04:29 PM
Anybody can cook some food. In my case I'm talking about helping my students improve and ultimately win.
If winning was simple, everyone would be doing it.

Here here :eusa_clap:eusa_clap Guess I'm taking a Swamp Boys class next :-D

Jacked UP BBQ
02-24-2010, 05:51 PM
Anybody can cook some food. In my case I'm talking about helping my students improve and ultimately win.
If winning was simple, everyone would be doing it.

Not anyone can cook some food, believe me my wife tries. Is your class sold out yet? I know a few guys on here were talking about going.

chopshop
02-24-2010, 06:13 PM
Jacked up- did you REALLY airbrush your food? If so, thats amazing, I want pics. If you didn't, well, you got me....
oh yeah he did. farking clown had me at the craft store looking for airbrushes. my fingers are still red from that crap, but it looked amazing. I think i have pics of that ill have to look for them.

ique
02-24-2010, 06:17 PM
Here is something we experimented with in the past, I will share it because we do not do it anymore. We airbrushed smoke rings on with food paint, it looked farking amazing, we don't do it anymore because it stains your fingers and takes to long and the food gets ice cold. But it is the best looking thing you will ever see. There is an idea that I thought I came up with, but I doubt it! Anyone else want to throw soething out there!

Well there is a big difference between a unique idea that wins contests and just a unique idea (wasabi mod). :-P

Last season I took a comp class (Rod and Mr. Trigg) and taught a comp class. In my class, I gave printed handouts of our methods to all the students and asked them not to post on a forum. As far as I know everyone was very respectful of that request.

Yes, you can look up all sorts of competition techniques via Google. The trick is knowing which ones to use, how to combine them into an overall program that works. This is what was most valuable to me in the Rod and Johnny class. Some ideas were new, some were ideas that I had used in the past but abandoned (not sure why). I was able to restructure a few things based on their tried and true programs and it paid off big time later in my season.

Rub
02-24-2010, 07:06 PM
Not anyone can cook some food, believe me my wife tries. Is your class sold out yet? I know a few guys on here were talking about going.

Not quite sold out, I've filled about 24 out of 30 seats so far. There's still a few more days left before I cut it off.
Sorry bout your wife and cooking :rolleyes::lol:

Konrad_Haskins
04-16-2010, 09:34 PM
Interesting thread since I'm one of the busiest BBQ instructors around. My first class as a student was a hoot. Won grand champion by doing everything the instructor said not to do. My second class was prize for being regional rookie of the year. It was James and Lola Rice's class. It taught me how to cook Brisket and I instantly started winning in Brisket beating top elite teams.

I don't claim to teach competition BBQ even though that is my roots. The Rice's class did affect my technique and I teach my techniques which they influenced. My recipes are 100% my own and there is nothing like winning with your own sauce and rub.

After a long competition hiatus I pinged Rod Gray and asked permission to take his class. I explained my motivation was to get back in the saddle not steal content for my class. Rod being the awesome guy that he is, not only said OK but gave me permission to share. I have no plans to share :hand:

When my students want a competition class I suggest they take Rod's class. The weekend after his last class two students at different events took GC. I can hardly wait for the end of July. I told Harry Soo to take Rod's class and he did eventually. But he needed some help now. So we did a one on one class for Harry who had already taken our day 1 class and the rest is history :-D

CBQ
04-16-2010, 10:59 PM
I'm with you 100% Dan, same also like if you go on tv using muffin pans you can not get upset if next year you see people using muffin pans. If you don't want others to know then keep it a secret.

You can't make Myron's muffin pan chicken from what you see on Pitmasters, he saves plenty of details for the class.

In the competition classes I have taken, the instructors have always said something along the lines of "It's your information now, and you can share it if you want, but why would you?"

I agree. The information comes at you fast in a class, and capturing that, turning it into a recipe, and turning the recipe into a process that will work well on my gear takes an investment in time that goes beyond simply paying a fee and sitting in a classroom. I have to make that effort before the information is in a format that could be shared, so I tend to keep the information within my team. (I do sometimes compare notes with other people that I know have taken the class.)

This doesn't mean I won't answer questions. I love answering barbeque questions posed by the public at a contest, but that's different than just giving it all away.

Ye Olde Party Palace
04-17-2010, 01:26 PM
I think that sharing printed material from a class would not be proper. As far as verbally sharing info, I think that info might end up like the old parlor game of "I've Got A Secret". One person starts by passing detailed info to the next as "whispered" info. By the time it makes the circle of the room it is no longer recognizable as to what was originally started. The same would probably be true in "whispering" secrets from any of the BBQ classes.

If you don't hear it straight from the MASTER, it probably ain't so.:confused::tape:

rle5766
04-17-2010, 02:05 PM
I believe if you pay for them they are yours to do what you will. I also feel you should be careful who you share them with you mite be putting yourself back in the pack on the call list at a competition. I love talking about BBQ, but there are some people who pick you for info and never tell you anything about what they do.