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View Full Version : Why is enhanced meat legal in KCBS?


Brew-B-Q
02-16-2010, 01:38 PM
Just curious, why can you use meats that are injected with something by the manufacturer, but you can't inject or brine the meat yourself prior to inspection?

Why even allow the enhanced meat? I know it likely doesn't fare well, but just curious why it is even allowed.

Diva
02-16-2010, 01:56 PM
As long as it isn't teriyaki, lemon pepper, or things like that, it was approved due to the manufacturers. This was brought up quite a few years back when enhanced meats started to be the "norm". I worked in the KCBS office at the time and phoned NUMEROUS meat manufacturers about enhanced meats and they said it was where meat was heading, it would be more prominent.

CivilWarBBQ
02-16-2010, 02:13 PM
Salt water is a sure way to increase profits when you can sell it at a buck a pound or more. Practically all the fresh chicken and pork now stocked by Wall-mart is pre-pumped, and a good portion of the beef. Some of the really cheap brands like Pilgrim's Pride are nearing 20% solution by weight!

It's a shame, but the so-called "enhancement" wave has gained so much momentum that nothing short of legislation is going to stop it as there's too much money involved.

barbefunkoramaque
02-16-2010, 02:30 PM
Its a stupid rule... who keeps people with RVs from switching the **** anyway. This I saw years ago.

Not to mention, one could (as I have seen another do personally) bring in a vac packed manufacturers case of meat that was injected and resealed.

Sure teriaki is hard to spot but lemon.

What the hell, let them boil simmer (they allow foiling) marinate anyway.... what wins wins.... what sucks sucks!

KC_Bobby
02-16-2010, 03:03 PM
Its a stupid rule... who keeps people with RVs from switching the **** anyway. This I saw years ago.


What would keep teams under an EZup from doing the same?

Just a few weeks ago I listened to a Iowa State Meat Lab grad student give a presentation on solution enhancements. And by listening, I mean I mostly day-dreamed about getting back on the comp trail through it. But I do recall him saying something about 4 different types of these solution enhancements being added to most meats as a means of getting these mass produced animal plant products to taste more like the meat John Doe Sr. had on his farm prior to the mass production animal plants.

I'll let Smokehouse 72, Buster Dog or Big Tz, Dirty Pig, WaterTower or Spanky add more as I'm sure each of them paid more attention then I did.

My opinion would be that the solutions add no advantage over the teams that are getting their cuts from sources that do not have an injection.

watertowerbbq
02-16-2010, 04:31 PM
What I recall was that he said the enhancements were an effort to help keep the meat juicy, even if it was overcooked. The idea was to make a product that was appealing to the general public (i.e. it wasn't dry). He specifically stated that some people still think pork needs to be cooked well past 160F because that's what Grandma told them. The enhancement is kind of like an insurance policy to try and help keep the meat moist. I think he also stated that the enhancements were also to add shelf life to the product.

Marination (as he called it) was to help tenderize or break down the meat and add flavor, but not necessarily to help retain moisture.

The presenter did say that the amount of enhancement solution was self-limiting which means that at some point, too much solution effects the flavor in a negative way. Therefore, there is a practical limit as to how much enhancement can be used.

I'm not a meat scientist, but I did stay at a holiday inn express once. :-D

Rookie'48
02-16-2010, 05:18 PM
Yep, some of it is for flavor, some for tenderness, some for moisture (to protect us from ourselves), and some of it is the fact that water contains much more profit than meat does on a pound per pound basis.

chromesporty
02-16-2010, 09:48 PM
It's all about added weight and extended shelf life. Both equal BIG $$$$. The rest is just spin.

This Is How We Que It
02-17-2010, 03:29 AM
Most of our teams are chemicly enhanced, why shouldn't our meat be?

ModelMaker
02-17-2010, 11:37 AM
Bobby, I knew you weren't listnening cause I could see the far off look in your eye and hear you humming "we are the champions my freind...".
ModelMaker

PatioDaddio
02-18-2010, 12:45 AM
The short answer is enforcement. How in the world would a contest rep have any reasonable way to detect a basically undetectable enhancement? If I can't tell without reading the label, how can anyone else? It's specifically intended to go unnoticed.

Just my $0.02,
John

Brew-B-Q
02-18-2010, 10:32 AM
I get availability, I get it's hard for reps to tell. I still don't get why it's much different than if I brined my meat ahead of time. Because the quality of injection in the enhanced meat is inferior? Just seems silly to allow prebrined meat in one case and not others.

KC_Bobby
02-18-2010, 11:17 AM
What I recall was that he said the enhancements were an effort to help keep the meat juicy, even if it was overcooked. The idea was to make a product that was appealing to the general public (i.e. it wasn't dry). He specifically stated that some people still think pork needs to be cooked well past 160F because that's what Grandma told them. The enhancement is kind of like an insurance policy to try and help keep the meat moist. I think he also stated that the enhancements were also to add shelf life to the product.

Marination (as he called it) was to help tenderize or break down the meat and add flavor, but not necessarily to help retain moisture.

The presenter did say that the amount of enhancement solution was self-limiting which means that at some point, too much solution effects the flavor in a negative way. Therefore, there is a practical limit as to how much enhancement can be used.

I'm not a meat scientist, but I did stay at a holiday inn express once. :-D

Bobby, I knew you weren't listnening cause I could see the far off look in your eye and hear you humming "we are the champions my freind...".
ModelMaker

yeah, i think watertower's comments prove that I didn't retain the right pieces of information. But I do recall he did say something about injections dealing with helping with taste due to taste changes with mass production hog factories.

Balls Casten
02-18-2010, 01:05 PM
Come on boys .. where's your notes on pump rates?
I remember from last years class that it was for moisture and did very little to change the flavor. But I may have been thinking of lunch during that presentation as well.