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slowerlowerbbq
02-15-2010, 07:46 PM
Greetings brethren! Thanks so much for this forum and all the great info (and entertainment) you all provide. Now on to my first post...

Just a quick back story...have done a couple competitions that last couple years...had NO IDEA what the fark I was doing...been queing and cooking as long as I can remember so I always went off of instinct. Though I was never really satisfied with my results...it was OK...but just that, OK. After my last competition, I decided I was going to take it seriously this year. I've been reading online non-stop since November, lurking here and elsewhere, taking in the great knowledge you guys and gals make available for us noobs. Finally, I bought a 22.5 WSM and put that knowledge to use and finally made some que I could be proud of. It was really farking good and I am my own worst critic. Now, I feel more confident to do about 5 competitions in the coming season.

Whew...now my question. For all of you that compete successfully, how do you feel about the taste of your turn-ins? Would you eat it at home? Do you turn in and win with que you wouldn't eat yourself? I keep reading about how a lot of competition cooks cook differently at home than they do at competition. I am really curious to know if you do and why. So much of what I am learning about comp BBQ goes against everything I do when I cook otherwise.

Sorry if this has been asked before :icon_blush: ...I am a n00b :-D

MilitantSquatter
02-15-2010, 07:56 PM
This was one of the three reasons I stopped competing on my own.

I quickly learned that what I enjoyed cooking and serving to family/friends was not going to to please the judges frequently enough to justify spending $1000/weekend. I switched to employing different rubs, sauces, injections and cooking techniques just to win a trophy or cash. Getting the high placings was exciting at first but after a while it began to feel like a bad job.

Jacked UP BBQ
02-15-2010, 07:56 PM
I do not enjoy my comp food, it is too sweet for my liking, I do love the taste for one bite, but there is way too much flavor for an entire rack, or a pulled pork platter if you know what I mean.

PimpSmoke
02-15-2010, 07:59 PM
Unfortunately, no.

Never mind you said, "compete successfully", that takes me out, sorry.

Alexa RnQ
02-15-2010, 07:59 PM
I have refused to eat our competition chicken for over a year. Too much practice killed that bird off.

Ribs and pork are big favorites with family/helpers/fans, so those generally get bagged and given away.

We always bring home our brisket for consumption, though. *wonders idly if there's a vacuum-pack in the freezer still*

watg?
02-15-2010, 08:12 PM
I can only eat it after the Wednesday following the comp. The day of and day after the comp, I want nothing to do with que!

chromesporty
02-15-2010, 08:14 PM
Brisket yes. Ribs and chicken, way to sweet for my taste. We don't do much pulled pork in this part of the world, but when we cook it, it's one of my favorites.

thillin
02-15-2010, 08:18 PM
Brisket yes. Ribs and chicken, way to sweet for my taste. We don't do much pulled pork in this part of the world, but when we cook it, it's one of my favorites.

Ditto

Brauma
02-15-2010, 08:23 PM
Would you eat it at home? Do you turn in and win with que you wouldn't eat yourself?

Yes, I would eat it because thats how I practice. But for everyday BBQ, you cant afford to fix comp BBQ. And I wouldnt want to. I think you get the drift. It's over-the-top with flavor. You cant eat a plate full of it. You have to make sure the judge who takes one bite gets a mouthful.

Buster Dog BBQ
02-15-2010, 08:30 PM
I tend to use the same concepts only sometimes I will alter the rub and sauce at home. I do eat my leftovers from most contest in all 4 meats.

barbefunkoramaque
02-15-2010, 08:49 PM
This is a funny little question that requires a lot of reflection on my part. Year ago I had greater success advising a team to adopt a plan or recipe and do well than I could do probably by myself.

I am one of those souls that had a capacity to do well earlier on by cooking to win. This is what makes the winning most teams what they are. Typically their ego does not get in the way.

Early on I did very well... I do not want to go on about it.

After I became more cynical about where the whole concept of BBQ and its expansion was going I became very jaded. As more judges, you know the ones that don't know **** about Q and still have their crotchpot sauced up image in their minds as well as the oath they just took minutes before, as more and more of those judges showed up it was either serve what was traditionally great que or....

Go into the tents and slice their throats individually or run them over with trucks or throw a grenade in. Of course thats not an option until they begin grouping judges by experience.... so.... if I was say, going to turn in a brisket in Kansas, I would not make any allotment for local traditions. This ended up in ****ty scores.

So would I eat my older competitive BBQ now or my own? I would eat my own, because my last turn ins were injected with antifreeze and glittered with crushed mothballs in order to take a judeg or two out.

This is a humorous hat tip off to all the farkers out there who cook to win, That in itself is a skill.... to override what is truely good to satiate a local or inexperienced judge.

Contracted Cookers
02-15-2010, 08:49 PM
no it usely sucks

Rub
02-15-2010, 08:52 PM
I always eat and share my leftovers for lunch at work. I only cook the main 4 at home maybe 2-3 times a year.
I figure cooking on the road 30-35 weekends a year is enough :icon_smil

widespread
02-15-2010, 08:53 PM
Pork and brisket yes. Chicken, ribs no. Like George said, I don't want to see or eat que for a few days afterward.
Are you Mark from Stallard Chassis? My buddy Don used to work for you as a welder.

slowerlowerbbq
02-15-2010, 08:57 PM
Pork and brisket yes. Chicken, ribs no. Like George said, I don't want to see or eat que for a few days afterward.
Are you Mark from Stallard Chassis? My buddy Don used to work for you as a welder.

Loving all the responses!

Hi Jon, I am his son. USed to work there back in the '80's

JD McGee
02-15-2010, 09:04 PM
Yes...and no...:cool: Most of our comp food is sold at cost to my neighbors and co-workers...we do keep a rack of ribs or two on occasion though...:biggrin:

widespread
02-15-2010, 09:05 PM
Nice to meet you Mark. Your dad builds some badass little race cars!
Hope to see you at some comps this year!

watertowerbbq
02-15-2010, 09:22 PM
i don't keep chicken from the comp, but there is usually only 1 or 2 pieces left anyway. the rest i keep and hand out to others.

watertowerbbq
02-15-2010, 09:23 PM
i will say that i eat Q now less than when i started practicing a lot. i'll eat a little bit of whatever it is i'm practicing on, but after that it's lunch for the neighbors, family or co-workers.

Peteg
02-15-2010, 09:43 PM
I could eat the brisket or pork. I'm not a big bbq chicken fan. Comp ribs are way too sweet for my taste.

KC_Bobby
02-15-2010, 09:46 PM
Chicken - yes, now that it's improved over the past year - I actually like it. It's not as sweet as a lot of chicken I've had while judging
Ribs - hell yes, cause Don cooks them and that's about the only time I eat em
Pork - yes, my home recipe is nearly the same as my comp - minus the $$ injection and only injected with apple juice
Brisket - our comp brisket is a bit salty for my taste. I'd prefer a brisket just seasoned with ground pepper and basted with a bit of beer

slowerlowerbbq
02-15-2010, 09:58 PM
Nice to meet you Mark. Your dad builds some badass little race cars!
Hope to see you at some comps this year!

Nice to meet you too, Jon. And yes, the Stallard Chassis is mighty fine car :wink:. I'll look you up this season.

Back to the topic...I have to say that I always HATED chicken thighs until I was doing my first cook with my WSM and just threw on some thighs to see how they would turn out. I didnt even try! I had brisket and pork butts going that I slaved over and then there were thighs that I simply "phoned in" and everybody LOVED em. And they were darn good, too. Good thing I at least wrote down the recipe. The next time they were even better.

But the last practice my partner and I did, we tried to copy Johnny Trigg's ribs the way we saw them done on BBQ Pitmasters. Well...they were HORRIBLE...tasted like candy. No one liked them, either...except maybe my 11 year old daughter. And I think she just tolerated them (she LOVES BBQ). That seems to be the consensus among some about ribs being too sweet. But, I dont think I could turn in something that tasted like these did.

Jeff_in_KC
02-15-2010, 10:07 PM
Trigg ribs - Perfect example of why comp meats aren't generally what people would eat at home. You say they were like candy and that's kind of the way they're meant to be to give to judges. Other than some pulled pork and an occasional bit of brisket, competing has almost ruined my love of eating barbecue. At home, I'd rather smoke a beef tenderloin or prime rib to medium rare or cook something else not comp related.

Dale P
02-16-2010, 02:09 AM
I do eat my comp food but we do not make sweet BBQ unless we are North of the Ohio river.:icon_bugeyed

Chipper
02-16-2010, 05:34 AM
Other than brisket for chili, all of the rest goes to friends, customers, friends, and neighbors. I'll taste some while practicing and at comps, but that is it.

roksmith
02-16-2010, 06:06 AM
Like most, I think, I can't stand the site of any of it right after a long cook.
Not a huge fan of chicken that's been reheated, so it all hits the can.
The brisket, butt, and ribs all go home and reheat well. I actually do like the taste of our comp que.

Smokin' Gnome BBQ
02-16-2010, 08:00 AM
I actually LOVE my brisket, I would rather have it then about any other beef product while out for dinner.

pork, save some give most to my wifes co-workers..

ribs dont reheat well for me and mine arent too sweet.

chicken...we wont even go there.....stupid chicken!!!

Sal

Capn Kev
02-16-2010, 08:15 AM
i will say that i eat q now less than when i started practicing a lot. I'll eat a little bit of whatever it is i'm practicing on, but after that it's lunch for the neighbors, family or co-workers.

^^^^same here^^^^

Divemaster
02-16-2010, 08:39 AM
Actually, other than tasting prior to judging, I really don't eat what we turn-in. Once the boxes are done and the guys take what they want, we bag up the rest for me to take into the office on Monday and I usually bring a sandwich. When asked, I just tell them that after cooking all weekend I'm kind of burned out on BBQ. In reality, I just don't like the flavor of my comp food.

Now the stuff I cook for friends and family, those recipes come from a different book... Those I like.

widespread
02-16-2010, 10:21 AM
chicken...we wont even go there.....stupid chicken!!!

Sal

LOL, thanks for the chuckle.

We only cook 10 pieces of chicken anymore. Turn in 6 or 8 depending on how big they are, have 2 or 4 to taste and they're all done. No leftover chicken. We give the ribs away too.

G$
02-16-2010, 11:07 AM
how do you feel about the taste of your turn-ins? They are OK except for a tendency to overcook everything.

Would you eat it at home?
Yes, I would and do eat the same product at home and in competition.

Do you turn in and win with que you wouldn't eat yourself?
No, unlike others, many of them very succesful, I really would not cook and turn in food that I would not eat myself.

The Giggler
02-16-2010, 11:08 AM
I like the big flavors of comp que, and enjoy the practice cooks. At a contest, we share the leftovers with guests or split what's left.

After the contest, we have a tradition of Italian or Hot Dogs before diving into the Q over the next few days.

I'd love one of those vacuum sealers for both pretrimmed meats and leftovers. Need to get off the wallet and pick one up.

CivilWarBBQ
02-16-2010, 12:34 PM
Sure we do.

We split up the leftovers and each takes some home - the married guys share with the wife and/or kids. I like to taste the samples after a couple days to get a true check of flavor without my palette saturated by smoke. (You can't get the same impression the judges when you've been standing in the smoke all night) Of course tenderness is out the door so I just ignore that.

As far as eating comp Que as a meal; it's too rich and highly sugared & spiced to truly enjoy eating a big plate of it. Like most folks I prefer "regular" BBQ for a meal. I don't tend to eat a lot of it, but I sample our products at the restaurant every week.

smoken don
02-16-2010, 03:13 PM
We also got tired of our food.Now it's friends and family.

Southern Home Boy
02-16-2010, 03:37 PM
I've only done one comp. but the stuff that I liked the best we did the worst in (except chicken....stupid chicken...:lol:) and the stuff I almost threw out got us second and sixth place out of an 80 team field.

So, I guess my answer is that the stuff I really like, the judges don't.

Now, I've been practicing a LOT and I think I have a product that we can both agree on.

We'll see in a few weeks.

slowerlowerbbq
02-16-2010, 03:59 PM
I've only done one comp. but the stuff that I liked the best we did the worst in (except chicken....stupid chicken...:lol:) and the stuff I almost threw out got us second and sixth place out of an 80 team field.

So, I guess my answer is that the stuff I really like, the judges don't.

Now, I've been practicing a LOT and I think I have a product that we can both agree on.

We'll see in a few weeks.

Our last comp, ribs that were to die for came in almost DAL...almost. But the chicken I turned in that SHOULD have been DAL, came in about 45th out of 80. Wish I had a picture of those to share on the "what not to turn in" thread.

jswordy
02-16-2010, 04:27 PM
This was one of the three reasons I stopped competing on my own.

I quickly learned that what I enjoyed cooking and serving to family/friends was not going to to please the judges frequently enough to justify spending $1000/weekend. I switched to employing different rubs, sauces, injections and cooking techniques just to win a trophy or cash. Getting the high placings was exciting at first but after a while it began to feel like a bad job.

I like this and Southern Home Boy's somments. As a proudly non-competitive barbecuer who cooks to please friends, I have never figured out why the comp-winning stuff seems to be so far from what would please a crowd of neighbors gathered in the backyard. Now I realize there are different tastes in different areas of the country and all, but it's baffling to me why the goals are so different from one another. But they seem to be, and there has to be a reason. Can anyone explain this?

Coz
02-16-2010, 05:03 PM
I try to save some of the brisket .Other then that if Ford is there the chix goes home for his kids(dogs) And we try to give away the rest.

Alexa RnQ
02-16-2010, 05:33 PM
I like this and Southern Home Boy's somments. As a proudly non-competitive barbecuer who cooks to please friends, I have never figured out why the comp-winning stuff seems to be so far from what would please a crowd of neighbors gathered in the backyard. Now I realize there are different tastes in different areas of the country and all, but it's baffling to me why the goals are so different from one another. But they seem to be, and there has to be a reason. Can anyone explain this?
If I were to hazard a guess, it would be that backyard eaters don't give a damn about cookie-cutter bites from chicken skin, how quickly the rib bone turns white (and they're happier if the meat falls off), have never met mushy pork they didn't like, more than likely have never pull-tested a slice of brisket, and usually aren't as critical of out-of-balance flavors.

In short, they are not judging the food by KCBS standards. But that's all good, because whatever BBQ they're eating will always be the best they've ever had.

CMALANGA
02-16-2010, 09:05 PM
Yes...that's proably why I don't have any trophies though. Purely cooking for the judges liking would create BBQ, in my opinion, that I wouldn't eat, whether because of the salt content, MSG, etc. I'm strill trying to get in there my way...I guess I like pain.

Bigdog
02-16-2010, 09:37 PM
At a comp I heard someone say: "We don't eat this crap!" This is rather sad IMHO.

I did taste several pieces of 13th place chicken at the Royal that was damn good though.

Ranbo
02-16-2010, 09:47 PM
I'll eat the brisket and ribs. Sick of cooking and eating chicken period, stupid judges.

Other than brisket, what I like the judges don't. Last cook was worst ribs I've made and took 10th.

Good eating `que is not comp. `que.

This Is How We Que It
02-17-2010, 03:09 AM
No, We are vegetarians.

KC_Bobby
02-17-2010, 08:23 AM
If I were to hazard a guess, it would be that backyard eaters don't give a damn about cookie-cutter bites from chicken skin, how quickly the rib bone turns white (and they're happier if the meat falls off), have never met mushy pork they didn't like, more than likely have never pull-tested a slice of brisket, and usually aren't as critical of out-of-balance flavors.

In short, they are not judging the food by KCBS standards. But that's all good, because whatever BBQ they're eating will always be the best they've ever had.

And on top of that, 4 out of 5 dentists neighbors and friends will drown the meat in sauce before even tasting just the meat.

early mornin' smokin'
02-17-2010, 08:59 AM
we eat our comp food, but than again we only do 2 comps a year, and cook to better our skills. We've learned a lot about flavor and what its supposed to be, but honestly, we only cook it twice a year, maybe 4 with practice cooks, so hells yes, im eating it!

Jorge
02-17-2010, 09:12 AM
I like this and Southern Home Boy's somments. As a proudly non-competitive barbecuer who cooks to please friends, I have never figured out why the comp-winning stuff seems to be so far from what would please a crowd of neighbors gathered in the backyard. Now I realize there are different tastes in different areas of the country and all, but it's baffling to me why the goals are so different from one another. But they seem to be, and there has to be a reason. Can anyone explain this?

When you cook for friends, are there 5 other people there serving the exact same types of food?

The flavors are so much bigger in competition cooking to stand out, and make a favorable impression in the one or two bites a judge will take. On the other side of the coin, I've talked to more than one cook that has cut back on the intensity of flavors in an attempt to stand out and, for lack of a better term, not offend anyone. Sometimes it's worked, and sometimes it hasn't.

ique
02-17-2010, 01:51 PM
I like this and Southern Home Boy's somments. As a proudly non-competitive barbecuer who cooks to please friends, I have never figured out why the comp-winning stuff seems to be so far from what would please a crowd of neighbors gathered in the backyard. Now I realize there are different tastes in different areas of the country and all, but it's baffling to me why the goals are so different from one another. But they seem to be, and there has to be a reason. Can anyone explain this?


I cook to please friends and usually cook exactly like I do at contests. Pretty much everyone I cook for likes the barbecue. I dont think the goals are different at all, I try to cook a style of barbecue that pretty much anyone would like.

I do think that barbecue cooks (who cook bbq often) tend to like spicy or very basic seasoning on their bbq. But when you are cooking for the masses and are trying to please a mix of kids, seniors, adults etc competition style bbq is very well received.

Mo-Dave
02-17-2010, 02:19 PM
Shoot I can barley eat my home Q let a lone my comp Q.
Dave

jswordy
02-18-2010, 08:59 AM
Thanks for the answers, which sort of ran the gamut.

ique, I was at the Jack. It is obvious you have done well with that philosophy.

Jorge, your thought had crossed my mind, as well. The drive to stand out from among a pile of boxes is definitely there. A contest to me, as an observer, is kind of like simultaneous polar opposites of max conformity in some things and divergence in others.

I'm sorry, but I reckon I am just too common and unsophisticated to be able to comprehend DivaHerself and KC Bobby's answers. I guess wondering how the KCBS standards got so far away from the real world is part of why I asked my question.

I like going to comps to watch, but I enjoy feeding a bunch of folks. And I dunno, but I think even unsophisticated people can tell bad cue, though they may not tell the cooker, and the national BBQ passion for certain name restaurants located in these parts seems to prove me wrong. (Marketing is a wonderful thing, I reckon.)

Thanks again for the responses. I appreciate it, since my question is really kind of off topic. I learned some things. Sorry to semi-hijack the thread.

Porkmeister
02-18-2010, 09:29 AM
We cook the way our Family & Friends like it. Maybe that's why we are never really close to winning, well except Chicken. My Chicken has won more times then not for some reason.

Everyone here likes drop dead fall off the bone ribs, NG for Comp.

We like Sauce & Rub with some "heat" in it, not just a pound of sugar and corn syrup.

Pork, well lets just say we like it.

Brisket, well we don't like it and the Judges sure don't like it!

So I guess the bottom line is yes I eat my "Q" and we always have way to many Friends stopping by at Comps that eat it also. Maybe if we cooked for the Judges I wouldn't be this poor!

Mike

KC_Bobby
02-18-2010, 09:43 AM
I'm sorry, but I reckon I am just too common and unsophisticated to be able to comprehend DivaHerself and KC Bobby's answers. I guess wondering how the KCBS standards got so far away from the real world is part of why I asked my question.


I assume you are referring to this:

If I were to hazard a guess, it would be that backyard eaters don't give a damn about cookie-cutter bites from chicken skin, how quickly the rib bone turns white (and they're happier if the meat falls off), have never met mushy pork they didn't like, more than likely have never pull-tested a slice of brisket, and usually aren't as critical of out-of-balance flavors.

In short, they are not judging the food by KCBS standards. But that's all good, because whatever BBQ they're eating will always be the best they've ever had.

And on top of that, 4 out of 5 dentists neighbors and friends will drown the meat in sauce before even tasting just the meat.

If so, while I should let Diva answer for herself, I believe she is referring to judging standards as taught by KCBS certified judging instructors. While many of the tests they demonstate may be a bit concrete, they allow for the judge to subjectively judge each sample. I personally wouldn't say many of these tests are off from what makes real world BBQ the best it could be by any cook - competitive, restaurateur or backyard hobbyist.

Perfectly shaped thighs, yes. But overcooked mushy meat is overcooked mushy meat whether it's provided in a Styrofoam box, a paper plate or fine china. The pull test, while actually something many judges do (including me), it can be looked at as a euphemism for saying is it fully cooked, do you need chew on it forever, or did the brisket just fall apart. Overcooked Q is generally better then undercooked due to a friendly texture for eating, but over cooking while often creating a less then optimum texture can also take some of the great flavors out of the meat.

What KCBS standards are doing are providing the judges with methods to test these factors.

I was simply joking that most people who come over to eat in someone's backyard are going to heavily sauce the meat before even tasting it on the merit of the meat itself.

And finishing 38th of 38th doesn't necessarily mean you cooked bad Q. In fact, at most comps I believe nearly all the teams cook good Q. I agree that most people can tell bad Q from good Q. But how many can tell great Q from good Q after they've drowned the meat in sauce?

lunchlady
02-18-2010, 12:37 PM
yep, I agree with iQue...

We cook the same at home and for catering as we do at comps.
Maybe cook the ribs a little longer and re-heat for catering, but that's the only difference. Never had anyone hate it, and people usually come back too.

We eat our comp Q ALL the time. Personally, I would rather have much more pepper and vinegar flavors than what we turn in, but that's just me. Sweet BBQ just doesnt do it for me, (I probably should live in Texas or the Carolina's) although judges in New England LOVE it!
If you want to be successful competing in your area, you have to figure out what your judges like, and I've found that it usually isn't what I like. So, you adjust.

I gotta say, I cooked last week, in the middle of a SNOWSTORM, a BBQ lunch for about 50 pipefitters, it was probably the best pork I personally have ever cooked. Definately the star of the show. Our own rub, Cattleman's tweaked a bit, and only apple juice injection. Dee-lish! They are still talking about it. I can only hope they call me up the next time they want lunch!

Southern Home Boy
02-18-2010, 12:46 PM
No, We are vegetarians.
:shock:.....:lol:.....:|

landarc
02-18-2010, 02:16 PM
If you want to be successful competing in your area, you have to figure out what your judges like,
I can't agree with this more. At the recent CBBQA Hangtown competition, I had the chance to taste some ribs and brisket cooked by the guys next to Humboldt Smoke, and the guy made great ribs and brisket. Perfectly balanced and savory, the pork and beef flavors were right up front, I really loved his ribs. But, it was KCBS judging standards and he was pulling 6's, if I found this product in a roadside stand, I am not sure I could ever drive past.

But, per CA tastes, he was not sweet enough and not spicy enough. Personally, I do not think you can call the flavors that win truly balanced, they are sweet and spicy, you need to hit that profile just right to win. I do want to try Rhythm and Ques cooking though, they are doing something right.

Lake Dogs
02-18-2010, 02:22 PM
Thanks for the answers, which sort of ran the gamut.

ique, I was at the Jack. It is obvious you have done well with that philosophy.

Jorge, your thought had crossed my mind, as well. The drive to stand out from among a pile of boxes is definitely there. A contest to me, as an observer, is kind of like simultaneous polar opposites of max conformity in some things and divergence in others.

I'm sorry, but I reckon I am just too common and unsophisticated to be able to comprehend DivaHerself and KC Bobby's answers. I guess wondering how the KCBS standards got so far away from the real world is part of why I asked my question.

I like going to comps to watch, but I enjoy feeding a bunch of folks. And I dunno, but I think even unsophisticated people can tell bad cue, though they may not tell the cooker, and the national BBQ passion for certain name restaurants located in these parts seems to prove me wrong. (Marketing is a wonderful thing, I reckon.)

Thanks again for the responses. I appreciate it, since my question is really kind of off topic. I learned some things. Sorry to semi-hijack the thread.

I think DivaHerself and KC Bobby are trying to explain the standard
definition and how to hit it rather than any particular preference, otherwise
a competition without it would be a complete crap shoot. Classic example
would be my father and I. He likes ribs grilled fairly fast and hot, the
kind you have to gnaw to get a bite, lots of fat still in it, and have the
sauce on it the whole time (apparently he likes burned sugars). Being
as that's how he cooked ribs growing up, I thought I hated ribs. Me,
personally, as long as it's still tender, I prefer a more fall off the bone
rib, with little or no sauce at all, spices coming from the rub. If there
were no "standard" set by KCBS (or any other sanctioning body), the
judging would be all over the place.

What jorge is referring to is that your Q has one and only one opportunity
to impress a judge. Everything else being great (moist, etc), the taste
needs to stand alone without offending (via. salt, heat, skunky taste).
I can tell you, more often than not, how your Q is judged/scored is
weighted by how the Q before you tasted. Notice in BBQ Pitmasters when
Jamie "ruined the pool" by slamming the judges with cayenne. Everything
after that got judged down (in theory, per Trigg). At a Pod chili cookoff
(yeah, I'm a CASI dude too) a few years back we had this discussion so
we did an experiment (with all judges agreeing). After judging was complete,
keeping the same order of judges and chili, we mixed a good amount of salt
into the chili located right before the winning chili. As expected, the scores
for the chili's before our experiment came in very close to dead on where
they were earlier, then the salty one got all 1's and 2's, and the next chili
(previous winner) went from 8's and 9's to 5's to 7's. The 2nd chili behind
it was also scored down quite a bit. It was 3 or 4 chilis behind it before
we saw a leveling (back to original) of scores. Weirdly, I think it was the
3rd chili behind the salty one that then scored higher than it did the first
time. No idea why...

Back to BBQ and your original question:

We do pretty much the same as Ique, except ours is probably has a
little more spice in the rub than his (guessing by his response), and that's
probably because we like spicy foods. Mind you, it's not as hot (cayenne)
as I personally prefer, but I really like heat. It's also a little sweeter than
I personally prefer, but again, I like a little more bite than john-q-average.
We have very few leftovers. When we do, it's chicken skins, and the
dogs love that, so it's all good.

CajunSmoker
02-18-2010, 05:42 PM
It's not just Que that I can't eat. Anything I have spent hours making, I can't eat for a while. I always serve everyone and go have a drink(or two). After a bit I can eat.

I cook our home Q very close to our comp Q. Usually just a little spicier than I would normally turn in (coonass mod):biggrin: and everyone loves it.

oceanpigassassins
02-18-2010, 11:30 PM
I do like our brisket but everything else needs a little more spice.