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cruzmisl
02-01-2010, 07:37 PM
Hi All,

I have a question for you caterers. It may be a stupid question but I have to ask.

Lets say you have a job (pulled pork and brisket) for 100ppl at a retirement party for example. The party is in a park and dinner is scheduled for 6pm. Do you drag your set up and start cooking at 6am in the park or do you precook at home? Just curious how you get everything timed?

Thanks,
Joe

Double W BBQ
02-01-2010, 07:41 PM
cook at home pack in chest and deliver.

txschutte
02-01-2010, 07:43 PM
Pre cooked fresh for serving time. Unless an onsite cooking gig is ordered, then I get the additional $500. My meats are timed backward from serve time, including transport.

Cooking without my kitchen is a PIA. If folks wanna show, they can get it for a price.

Spydermike72
02-01-2010, 07:44 PM
It depends, we have a lot of folks that like to have the smoker on site. It is a great conversation starter...

cruzmisl
02-01-2010, 07:55 PM
It depends, we have a lot of folks that like to have the smoker on site. It is a great conversation starter...

Yeah thats what I was curious about. If they want the smoker on site do you cook everything on site?

PCDoctor_1979
02-01-2010, 08:04 PM
In my case, if they want the on-site smoker I still cook everything at HQ as usual. I will fire up the smoker mostly just for appearance sake. I charge by the hour having the smoker on site with a three hour minimum. Once I tell a prospect the charge for the on-site smoker, they end up declining. Just my $0.02

Bbq Bubba
02-01-2010, 08:53 PM
Yeah thats what I was curious about. If they want the smoker on site do you cook everything on site?

We have, but its a LONG day.
Most jobs are cooked ahead and finished on site. They still get the show, just a condensed version. :cool:

big brother smoke
02-02-2010, 09:12 AM
Hot and fast is a go to tool in catering, if you are worried about being on a site for over 10 hours.

chopshop
02-02-2010, 11:31 AM
the truth is its easier to cook it at home and deliver it. but i like to get my smoker there first thing so i could start drinking this way by the time everyone gets to the party im wasted. ( even if i wasnt invited) there is nothing wrong with being the topic of conversation for 4-5 days

Prairie Smoke
02-02-2010, 03:45 PM
Prep at home, cook on site. It's part of the package that allows me to charge more per plate than other caterers in my market. The clients and their guests LOVE to see that their food is being cooked with a visible open fire. Not every caterer pulls a kitchen to the job with them, though, so YMMV. Now, as it's been mentioned, cooking real BBQ on site does not mean you have to arrive 18 hours early, you can turn out a good product cooking hot.

Mlukewow
02-02-2010, 10:41 PM
cook at Kitchen then throw some smoke for the show you can take it to 80% and then finish it off at location but gotta watch the temps up and down for health reasons

Bigmista
02-03-2010, 12:15 PM
We cook ahead of time and deliver. Showing up with the rig is $300 extra.

SirPorkaLot
02-03-2010, 02:22 PM
the truth is its easier to cook it at home and deliver it. but i like to get my smoker there first thing so i could start drinking this way by the time everyone gets to the party im wasted. ( even if i wasnt invited) there is nothing wrong with being the topic of conversation for 4-5 days

^^^^^^^^ Sounds like me, and is the exact reason I DON'T cater.

For me; cooking without drinking is not OK.

Dyce51
02-03-2010, 02:34 PM
If you cook ahead and deliver....do you cook in a commercial kitchen?? I know I was told I'd have to cook onsite since I do not have access to a commercial kitchen.....

Dutchovendude
02-03-2010, 02:52 PM
I ditto what ^he^ said. In Utah, if you donít have a commercial kitchen, you have to cook on site to be legal. No cooking is allowed in the home.

jbrink01
02-06-2010, 08:52 AM
I cook at home in my Health Dept approved trailer and deliver at dinner time. I deliver in Cambro's. I don't bring the trailer along unless it's requested or the volume warrants it. Pay attention to what they said above. You cook at home and get somebody sick you could lose your house in a lawsuit. My insurance agent has been to my house and seen my trailer and shop set-up.

wild haggis
02-06-2010, 09:45 AM
For smaller catering events i always keep a written note of cooking and holding temps throughout the day, especially if you are doing most of the cooking in your home. It wont make it anymore legal, but it will give you and any sensitive guests peace of mind.
Joe

Mlukewow
02-06-2010, 01:37 PM
Yes sorry commercial kitchen, I forgot to mention that and then I throw the smoke to make the customer smell the goodies finishing.