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Skidder
01-06-2010, 08:54 PM
Can anyone tell me what the difference is between pro bbq teams and so called backyard bbq teams in competition? Thanks.

stlgreg
01-06-2010, 09:16 PM
generally money and the quality of competition

eagle697
01-06-2010, 09:18 PM
Depends on the comp. Some comps use the same rules for both, the only real difference is the entry fee and the prizes ( backyard tends to be much smaller, if any cash prizes, generally trophies and bragging rights) Some comps have a smaller backyard cook with only two of the 4 comp meats or 1 meat and stew, etc. THere are many variations in what you cook in backyard, main difference i have seen is cost of entry fee, and prizes.

Just Smokin' Around
01-06-2010, 09:18 PM
It depends on the contest, but, backyard will usually only cook 2 or 3 categories, generally chicken and ribs since they can be done in a single day. There may be a chef's choice mixed in there. Entry fee's are generally less as well as the payout.

BBQchef33
01-06-2010, 11:17 PM
i think hes talking about the teams, not the contest.

Im not sure if this is factual, and anyone correct me if im wrong, but it was explained to me in a casual conversation that your considered "a pro" if you've gotten paid.. amateur/backyard if not. So that first walk where u get a check makes u a pro. I think this was in relation to the different competition 'series' that KCBS was offering. Pro, Competitor, Ironman, etc..



There was a real hot thread on this a while back. i will see if i can find it.

Dale in GA
01-07-2010, 07:13 AM
I recently moved to Pro from Backyard. The major difference is $$ payout, entry fees, competition categories, and judging. For example, last year a Kenessaw Pigs & Peach Backyard had 3 categories (Shoulder, Ribs, and Chicken). Pro's also do brisket. BY and Pros have Any Thing But. There were roughly 50 pros and 40 BY competitors. All were judged per KCBS but Pro judges were all certified, BY mostly certified with some local celebs.

Backyard is good competition and offers a great way to learn some of the ropes from the Pros. Hope to see you on the BBQ trail.

Dale in GA
01-07-2010, 07:15 AM
Just a clarification, most of the KCBS sanctioned events we've participated in also pay $$ for Backyard competitors but the payout is lower than Pro.

RubMeTender
01-07-2010, 10:01 AM
Are there any clear rules on Backyard vs. Pro? I think once you start getting into sponsorship money that should pretty much end any backyard standing you have. I've never understood where the line is.

Podge
01-07-2010, 10:05 AM
Backyard rules are usually left up to the organizer, but they model them sometimes to KCBS rules.

early mornin' smokin'
01-07-2010, 10:06 AM
woohoo...im a farking pro!

TN_BBQ
01-07-2010, 12:53 PM
Isn't it customary for a winning backyard team to be required to "graduate" to the pro division in upcoming events?

Bottom line, the backyard divisions are designed to be "simpler"

Podge
01-07-2010, 01:42 PM
Isn't it customary for a winning backyard team to be required to "graduate" to the pro division in upcoming events?

Bottom line, the backyard divisions are designed to be "simpler"

These are solely my opinions, but if a team wants to eventually compete in the "pros", they should just suck it up and start there. I did, and learned a lot !.. If a team ain't sure how far they want to take this bbq hobby, then backyard is perfect for them. If a team does really well in a few competitions, then they should go to "pro" and never go back to backyard. Progressive steps, don't go backwards.

chopshop
01-07-2010, 01:42 PM
backyard teams are not required to use 22 pounds of sugar on their ribs

Divemaster
01-07-2010, 01:59 PM
backyard teams are not required to use 22 pounds of sugar on their ribs
Exactly... Goes with the lighter judging....

Lake Dogs
01-07-2010, 02:58 PM
backyard teams are not required to use 22 pounds of sugar on their ribs

HOWEVER, they are required to drink the 22lbs of sugars...

Podge
01-07-2010, 03:12 PM
backyard teams are not required to use 22 pounds of sugar on their ribs

I don't think the "pro"teams are either.

BigJimsBBQ
01-07-2010, 04:00 PM
From My Humble Perspective:

Backyard Team - A BBQ Team that pays less $, receives less $ and has less quality and focused competitors.

Pro Team - A BBQ Team that pays more $, receives more $ and has more quality and focused competitors.

Red Valley BBQ
01-07-2010, 06:53 PM
The categories can differ drastically from KCBS. Last October I cooked KCBS (chicken, ribs, pork, brisket) on saturday and judged a backyard comp on sunday with these categories:

Wings
Pork (anything but ribs)
Sausage
Side dish
Dessert

The KCBS entry fee was $275 and the backyard fee was $125. There was an optional chili contest for another $75.

Plowboy
01-07-2010, 06:58 PM
Pro & Backyard use and definition varies by area of the country. Here in the midwest, we don't often have classes at competitions. From what I understand, which isn't much, there are often pro and backyard classes at comps in the SE. Someone correct me if I'm wrong.

Podge
01-07-2010, 07:04 PM
From My Humble Perspective:

Backyard Team - A BBQ Team that pays less $, receives less $ and has less quality and focused competitors.

Pro Team - A BBQ Team that pays more $, receives more $ and has more quality and focused competitors.


I almost 100% agree !.. except some backyarders actually have really good bbq, but they just throw it in the box.:icon_smil

CivilWarBBQ
01-07-2010, 08:01 PM
The Best Thing is also The Worst Thing about backyard/amateur/shadetree bbq contests: it is whatever the organizer decides it is. Categories, rules and judging criteria can and will be all over the map, from strict KCBS rules to pure popularity contests without blind entries or any training for judges at all beyond "vote for what you like". This gives dedicated organizers some leeway to produce some truly fine, unique events, but it also can make for a very disappointing experience when a contest is poorly run. (Sometimes we tend to forget that this was the reason KCBS was created in the first place, to provide better consistency and keep contests as fair as possible)

Not so long ago there was no such thing as a "backyard division" - there were only sanctioned and unsanctioned contests. In recent history, sanctioned events began adding a second tier to their competition with the idea of increasing attendance by enticing local, more casual people to come to the event: the local bank, service lodge, church group, that sort of thing. These folks weren't about to pay hundreds to enter, nor did they care about winning a bunch of money, so the Backyard Division was born where Joe could come out an play with his Weber kettle for a few sawbucks and take home a nice trophy to show off to the neighbors.

Now that KCBS is charging sanctioning fees for backyard events, it seems only right that they should offer some sort of official recognition, definition and/or structure to this type of contest, especially since the backyard is training ground for tomorrow's Pro cooks.

Contracted Cookers
01-07-2010, 08:53 PM
the contest i have seen that have both seems pretty segerated locals seem to do backyard for bragging rights want to know where you stand cook the big one

chopshop
01-07-2010, 10:06 PM
HOWEVER, they are required to drink the 22lbs of sugars...

is there sugar in tanqueray? if yes than 22lb is probably about right

Jacked UP BBQ
01-08-2010, 12:32 PM
Backyard cooks actually cook good food, not like the sweet non sense with msg, injections, and garbage all over it.

smoke showin'
01-08-2010, 02:04 PM
If you only cook once or twice a year do you think its fair to move backyarders into pro unless they have been doing it for 20 years ?

Podge
01-08-2010, 03:29 PM
If you only cook once or twice a year do you think its fair to move backyarders into pro unless they have been doing it for 20 years ?

If a backyarder has done exceptionally well, then yes. What's the point if a backyarder does two contests a year and wins both of them, year after year, after year.. No challenge to that IMO.. My first year of competing, I did 2 contests, both pro. Every year after that I've only done 6-8 contests.

If you did 2 contests as a backyarder and did marginally well, might as well just stick to that until you either find more time/money to move up in this hobby.