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beardjp
10-06-2009, 07:55 PM
I am working on an imformation sheet on BBQ Competition Etiquette for the Public visiting our competitions. I have listed what I have so far and would love input from the brethren. We hope to post these on oue website and hand them out at the Nelsonville, Ohio competition.



BBQ Competition Etiquette
Samples and meeting the teams



1. BBQ teams love to talk about their cooking and there cookers. Remember this is a professional competition. Between 11:00 am and 1:30 pm BBQ teams are preparing their entries for judging and may not be very talkative. Please take this into consideration, remember these teams have invested a lot of hours and money to compete.

2. Do not enter BBQ team cooking areas unless you are invited to do so. Teams are very busy and have routines that must be completed.

3. Food Samples – BBQ teams are not required to make food samples available to the public. Public food samples are entirely at the discretion of the BBQ team.

If a team does not have samples available please respect their wishes. Do not take anything from any teams cooking area; this may be their BBQ entry you just destroyed!!

Yakfishingfool
10-06-2009, 08:27 PM
I believe it is "their cookers". Scott

BBQchef33
10-06-2009, 08:31 PM
maybe mention that many board of health departments do NOT allow teams to give out food.

Buster Dog BBQ
10-06-2009, 08:44 PM
If you have vendors, I would say something about no samples and see the vendors (using better wording).

Podge
10-06-2009, 08:45 PM
"Public food samples are entirely at the discretion of the BBQ team"... the Health Dept. is o.k. with this statement ???.. i do like the intent of this etiquette sheet though !!!

The Virginian
10-06-2009, 08:53 PM
I would not do it. I have rarely found the public to be more than a temporary problem, and usually they are pretty delightful. These rules will only keep them away from the teams.

Brett

Dale P
10-06-2009, 10:51 PM
Most people are OK but I have had a person take food while I was boxing. Temporary maybe, but I wasnt delighted. lol.

Sidw
10-07-2009, 06:11 AM
I think the sheet is a good idea - while most people are polite and considerate by nature, sometimes they really do not realize that during turn-in times they can be visiting and asking questions at a bad time.

Food samples - I think the public believes it is a part of the whole event -We don't mind sharing some with public every now and then, but I think it can be unfair to vendors who paid to vend the event.

bbq ron
10-07-2009, 06:30 AM
i disagree, i would think common sense would prevail almost always IMO :-P:-P

watg?
10-07-2009, 07:32 AM
This is a good idea, I have often thought of suggesting something along these lines to contest organizers. The information could de disseminated either by flyers or posters around the contest grounds or both.

I think it would be very helpful to also include a brief explanation as to how the contest actually works. I find that many attendees don’t have a clue as to what is really going on. A short, complete synopsis would go along way toward educating the public. Another benefit to providing an explanation to folks would be to stimulate interest in competition cooking. You could also include some info as to how one could become involved in the following years contest.

A well informed public is much more likely to behave and use common sense, although not a guarantee, it would help. The information would also serve to stimulate interest in BBQ in general, along with the local contest.

Maybe, as an added bonus, include a BBQ recipe from one of the attending teams at the bottom of the sheet for the folks to take back home and try.

Alexa RnQ
10-07-2009, 07:42 AM
Honestly, a lot of the potential misunderstanding by the public that we've seen has been engendered by the event promoters. The practice of running local ads that proclaim "Come and taste championship barbecue!" clearly lead the public to believe they're going to eat, and most of them further assume they'll eat FREE from competitors, not paying vendors for what is clearly not competition food.

Then there is the practice of charging at the gate, on top of having to buy food. We've had members of the public huffily and loudly insist we stop work to explain to them exactly what their gate fee was for. And I can see their point, if they didn't particularly want to purchase a t-shirt or admission to a car show.

These marketing and organization practices are often undertaken by the venue's publicists and clearly not by the BBQ contest's organizer, so it's kind of unfair to lay it at the BBQ contest's doorstep to deal with/reeducate/straighten out.

pat
10-07-2009, 07:53 AM
Honestly, a lot of the potential misunderstanding by the public that we've seen has been engendered by the event promoters. The practice of running local ads that proclaim "Come and taste championship barbecue!" clearly lead the public to believe they're going to eat, and most of them further assume they'll eat FREE from competitors, not paying vendors for what is clearly not competition food.

Then there is the practice of charging at the gate, on top of having to buy food. We've had members of the public huffily and loudly insist we stop work to explain to them exactly what their gate fee was for. And I can see their point, if they didn't particularly want to purchase a t-shirt or admission to a car show.

These marketing and organization practices are often undertaken by the venue's publicists and clearly not by the BBQ contest's organizer, so it's kind of unfair to lay it at the BBQ contest's doorstep to deal with/reeducate/straighten out.



Ding Ding DIng!!

Divemaster
10-07-2009, 08:07 AM
When you do finish your Etiquette Statement, I would love to have it to pass on to a couple of events that I think would actually use it...

Honestly, a lot of the potential misunderstanding by the public that we've seen has been engendered by the event promoters. The practice of running local ads that proclaim "Come and taste championship barbecue!" clearly lead the public to believe they're going to eat, and most of them further assume they'll eat FREE from competitors, not paying vendors for what is clearly not competition food.

Then there is the practice of charging at the gate, on top of having to buy food. We've had members of the public huffily and loudly insist we stop work to explain to them exactly what their gate fee was for. And I can see their point, if they didn't particularly want to purchase a t-shirt or admission to a car show.

These marketing and organization practices are often undertaken by the venue's publicists and clearly not by the BBQ contest's organizer, so it's kind of unfair to lay it at the BBQ contest's doorstep to deal with/reeducate/straighten out.

I couldn't agree more...

ique
10-07-2009, 08:16 AM
The practice of running local ads that proclaim "Come and taste championship barbecue!" clearly lead the public to believe they're going to eat, and most of them further assume they'll eat FREE from competitors, not paying vendors for what is clearly not competition food.

Why else would someone attend a BBQ contest?

See Jeffs thread about Comp BBQ being under-reported. I believe we need to figure out a way to get the public more involved at contests if we want to the sport to grow beyond the competition community.

Most teams I see are perfectly capable of passing a health inspection in order to hand out at samples or sell leftover comp bbq.

timzcardz
10-07-2009, 08:34 AM
There are safety issued involved.

I would add a 2.a.




2.a. Do not enter BBQ team cooking areas unless you are invited to do so. Within the cooking areas are fire, hot items, and very sharp implements, that have the potential to cause severe injuries, especially when people become distracted and/or startled.

Alexa RnQ
10-07-2009, 08:40 AM
People attend BBQ contests for diverse reasons. Among the ones we've personally spoken to are those who are attending a conjoined event, those who have seen BBQ as portrayed on television and want to find out what the real local-level deal is, and those who hope to learn something for their own backyard experience from seasoned competitors. Not all show up solely for a free meal, although there are certainly many who seem to expect that.

Vending at comps isn't just about passing a health inspection. For smaller teams, it's a completely different prospect than for teams with multiple people who can devote time to it. For us, after getting in four entries we're whipped. We're old, fat and tired, our feet hurt, we have to bust down camp and get it all packed, and spending more time on our feet dishing out leftovers isn't always the best use of our time. That's not to say that it isn't perfectly fine for many teams who come prepared to vend, have the people to do it, and use it as a way to recoup their costs of competing.

There is quite a difference between honestly promoting BBQ by creating reasonable expectations among the attending public, and the practice of misleading advertising that fosters unhappiness in the attendees which is then directed at BBQ teams.

musicmanryann
10-07-2009, 08:41 AM
Why else would someone attend a BBQ contest?

See Jeffs thread about Comp BBQ being under-reported. I believe we need to figure out a way to get the public more involved at contests if we want to the sport to grow beyond the competition community.

Most teams I see are perfectly capable of passing a health inspection in order to hand out at samples or sell leftover comp bbq.

Once again Chris, I have thought about this for a long time and I couldn't agree more. I have done people's choice at every competition that offers it, and unless a contest organizer says its verboten, I try to give a taste to passersby.

Smokin' Gnome BBQ
10-07-2009, 08:48 AM
maybe mention that many board of health departments do NOT allow teams to give out food.

something along this line would be helpfull, at a comp this year I was "yelled" at a few times because of the radio ads to seemed to misslead alot of people.. Someone even gave my wife and sister-in-law crap as they were leaving about why they didnt get free food. My wife and SIL were wearing our shirts nothing else (yes they had pants on) and still got harrased.

musicmanryann
10-07-2009, 08:49 AM
There are safety issued involved.

I would add a 2.a.




2.a. Do not enter BBQ team cooking areas unless you are invited to do so. Within the cooking areas are fire, hot items, and very sharp implements, that have the potential to cause severe injuries, especially when people become distracted and/or startled.

I would also add saftey from the bbq team as well. If someone entered my site and just started touching and grabbing stuff, especially my cookers they would quickly find themselves with a size 11 green Converse All-Star up their rear-end.:wink:

Divemaster
10-07-2009, 09:21 AM
The practice of running local ads that proclaim "Come and taste championship barbecue!" clearly lead the public to believe they're going to eat, and most of them further assume they'll eat FREE from competitors, not paying vendors for what is clearly not competition food.

Why else would someone attend a BBQ contest?

See Jeffs thread about Comp BBQ being under-reported. I believe we need to figure out a way to get the public more involved at contests if we want to the sport to grow beyond the competition community.

Most teams I see are perfectly capable of passing a health inspection in order to hand out at samples or sell leftover comp bbq.
While I'll agree that most if not all are capable of passing a health inspection (and should be IMHO).

To be honest, I find it insulting when some one walks up and and the following conversation takes place in the middle of turn in (yes this is an actual conversation I had last year between chicken and ribs):

JQ Public: "Where's the food you promised us?"

Me: "Sorry, we're not giving any out right now, if you stop back after turn in we should have some out."

JQ Public: "Acording to the radio you would have food out all day."

Me: "Again, sorry, but we are here for the competition. That's what I'm cooking for and when we are done with our turn in, we'll put some of it out."

JQ Public: (Loudly) "I'm not looking for your LEFT OVERS, I want fresh food now! I paid to come in here!"

Me: "Sir, I too paid to come here and cook in the compitition, I did not pay to feed you your lunch. If the orginizers promised you food, I sugest that you find them. I never made such a promise."

Me: (It was at this point he reached for a half slab of ribs I was cutting up with a rather large knife.) "Sir, I don't think you really want to do that."

Luckly, one of the security staff was walking by at that time. I now make sure that we have enough people so that one of them is 'Standing Guard' over not only our prep area, but also our cooker.

Ford
10-07-2009, 09:51 AM
4. Friday evening is the best time to talk with cooks and learn about competition BBQ. And if you're lucky the team may just invite to to come back at turn-ins and try a sample. That's assuming you are serious about BBQ and competition and not just out for a free lunch.

OK so the wording needs work but the idea is sound. I've done this at contests with a no feeding the public rule. After all if I know Joe and he's a good guy (just met him Friday night) then he's a friend we can always feed friends.

ique
10-07-2009, 10:11 AM
To be honest, I find it insulting when some one walks up and and the following conversation takes place in the middle of turn in (yes this is an actual conversation I had last year between chicken and ribs):

JQ Public: "Where's the food you promised us?"


Yeah, I get that and yes organizers often do set unrealistic expectations.


JQ Public: (Loudly) "I'm not looking for your LEFT OVERS, I want fresh food now! I paid to come in here!"

I remember seeing Rod handing out his leftovers at the Grill Kings contest a few years ago... trust me Bud, you want these leftovers :) .

Just seems we need to find more ways for the attendees to get tastes of the teams barbecue.

trohrs123
10-07-2009, 10:14 AM
I think this etiguette sheet is a GREAT idea!! Although I have not experienced some of the pushier and obnoxious people that others in this thread have, I have to say that our better competitons have been the ones with a lot of RAIN. Our giant blue tarp covers our entire site and we have the opening to the back facing our nieghboring team...the public doesnt know that we are there. There are only so many times you can answer: " what is this contest all about?" "Can we taste your food?" "we want to judge, how do we sign up?" The first 100 times you answer ...well ok, but after that we put our cook and prep area as far to the back of the site away from John Q public as possible and pretend we are hard of hearing!!

Ford
10-07-2009, 10:44 AM
Do you really think comp teams can pass a vending inspection from the HD????? If the event charges to get in then we're vending wether we know it or not.

How many people here keep a 5 gallon thermos jug full of hot water on a table with a catch pail and soap and paper towels for hand washing????? You can not use one of the 3 bays for hand washing.

So IMHO ,ost teams could not pass an inspection.

Dr_KY
10-07-2009, 11:09 AM
How many people here keep a 5 gallon thermos jug full of hot water on a table with a catch pail and soap and paper towels for hand washing????? You can not use one of the 3 bays for hand washing.




**Raises hand just so Ford dosen't feel all alone.**
:lol::lol::lol::lol::lol::lol::lol:

ique
10-07-2009, 11:44 AM
Do you really think comp teams can pass a vending inspection from the HD?

At the Harpoon event in VT (50 team event), 75% or so vend and have to pass a HD inspection. The inspector is no slouch either.

TooSaucedToPork
10-07-2009, 11:47 AM
Coming from Memphis BBQ Network Contests and Memphis in May Comp. I've seen a whole lot of crazy crowds and problems. Its the nature of the beast in BBQ. Now that I cook in KCBS I am having more fun than I ever did in Memphis. Back home my team has had full shoulders stolen off the grill (Memphis in May 2004) and fights from other teams areas spilling into ours and knocking things all to hell WITH THE COPS RUNNING IN AND TAZERING PEOPLE LEFT AND RIGHT (Southhaven MS 2008) Thank the BBQ Gods that I have seen none of that kind behavior at contests up here in NY, granted I have only been to 2 since moving here in August.

The crowds always expect freebees from the teams, and there will always be idiots that will try to run off with a slab of ribs or try to steal a free beer. Everyone just has to remember that most of us started out as that crowd, looking across a table at a guy slicing up a brisket, or in my case a 9 year old going to my first Memphis in May and being awe-struck at the smells and sights around me...I made my dad promise me that when I got older we could enter the contest, and low and behold I've been doin it since I was 16. We just can't forget that the crowds bring in more people interested in the sport of BBQ and with out them, for the most part, we don't have contests.

Now back to topic:

Peoples choice and cooker caravan at MIM is by far the best thing I've seen to get the crowds involved.

Peoples choice the crowd pays 4 bucks for 5 samples (dixie cup size) of pulled pork. They vote on which is the best out of their samples...

Cooker Caravan is a tour of 3 team booths. It is free to spectators and is limited to 15 people per tour. Teams elect whether or not to be involved, and what times are best for them. A guide brings the group over for a 12 minute tour and question and answer session at your booth, you don't have to give samples if you don't want to, and it is a great way to connect with the public.

And as for public Ettiqutte, this is what they hand out at MIM to the public...hope it helps:

Before you visit the World Championship Barbecue Cooking Contest, there are some things you will need to know. We've tried to sum them up for you in the following:

This is a competition. Local health regulations prohibit teams from serving barbecue to the general public. There are barbecue vendors, as well as other food vendors that can sell to the public.
There are two programs for our patrons that allow them to experience the World Championship as a team or judge would: People's Choice Contest allows John "Que" Public to taste and judge championship barbecue. In this tent, you will receive 5 samples of barbecue each visit and you judge your favorite of those five samples. You may judge as often as you like and the judging fee is $4 per visit. The Cooker's Caravan takes you on a guided tour of the teams and lets you hear first-hand about the team's passion for pork. The team's will tell you about their secrets for grilling championship barbecue, show you their rigs and explain the process of cooking at Memphis in May. There is no charge for the tours and you may tour as often as you like. The tours are available Thursday and Friday every thirty minutes from 11:30am - 3:30pm.
The park is about a mile from end to end. Wear comfortable shoes!
No beverages, bicycles, cans, containers, coolers, food, glass bottles, laser pointers, lawn chairs, oversized umbrellas, pets, roller blades, roller skates, water guns, no thrown objects such as baseballs, footballs, frisbees-etc., or weapons. Food and beverages, including beer, are available from the concessionaires.
All packages and purses are subject to inspection.
Picture I.D.'s will be required from everyone purchasing alcohol.
All food must be purchased with cash. ATM's are available within the Festival site for your convenience.
We welcome many out-of-town visitors. Please let our guest services volunteers know you are our visitor and they will explain all of the rib-tickling entertainment offered

Bigmista
10-07-2009, 12:14 PM
Do you really think comp teams can pass a vending inspection from the HD????? If the event charges to get in then we're vending wether we know it or not.

How many people here keep a 5 gallon thermos jug full of hot water on a table with a catch pail and soap and paper towels for hand washing????? You can not use one of the 3 bays for hand washing.

So IMHO ,ost teams could not pass an inspection.

Almost all of the comps in Cali have People's choice so we have to be able to pass inspection.

We arrange our prep area so that our backs are to the crowd or we are in an enclosed tent area. Mainly because I almost cut someone's fingers off when he reached for a piece of brisket while I was prepping. We do it now to keep me out of jail.

monty3777
10-07-2009, 12:30 PM
Our team never has a problem with folks hanging out and trying to take our food. We have a sign printed that says: "Be sure and visit the following BBQ Team tents for your free samples: Big T's, Boondoggle, Buster Dog BBQ, Capt. Ron's." Be sure to ask for your complimentary beer!!!"

Seems to work for us

musicmanryann
10-07-2009, 12:37 PM
Our team never has a problem with folks hanging out and trying to take our food. We have a sign printed that says: "Be sure and visit the following BBQ Team tents for your free samples: Big T's, Boondoggle, Buster Dog BBQ, Capt. Ron's." Be sure to ask for your complimentary beer!!!"

Seems to work for us

LMAO! :lol::lol:

Ford
10-07-2009, 12:41 PM
Almost all of the comps in Cali have People's choice so we have to be able to pass inspection.
We have some peoples choice around here but I really think a number of organizers do not tell the HD about it. I've never been inspected in IL, MI, OH for peoples choice.

TooSaucedToPork
10-07-2009, 12:47 PM
We have some peoples choice around here but I really think a number of organizers do not tell the HD about it. I've never been inspected in IL, MI, OH for peoples choice.


We were never health inspected for Peoples Choice per say, the health dept had representatives that took meat temp when it was brought in (whole butt above 141 F)

We then had to break it up at turn in, and turn it back in to them at above 141F... most of us would bring boiling hot sauce in a thermos to bring the heat up...

Hawgsnheifers
10-07-2009, 12:53 PM
You should also put in there that peeking in ones smoker is like looking up your Wife's skirt, unless of course your Ok with that, which is fine if that's what your into...
My wife always tells me that she doesn't care who pumps up the tires as long as she get's to ride the bike...

dmprantz
10-07-2009, 02:24 PM
Biggest problems I've had is with reporters and Camber of Commerce employees trying to ask questions and take pictures during turn ins. Organizers should educate their own PR people if you ask me.

It has been commented a few times that HD may not allow free samples or you must pass a HD inspection to do free samples...I question this. Obviously it would depend from county to county, and I'd love to know of counties who actually do this, but the way it would seem to me is that if the contest is on private property, there is free admission to the public, and I am not charging money for the food I am giving away, does a health department have any right to prevent me from doing that? Things can change if it's on public property or you are SELLING food, and I'm sure a HD inspector can make life hard on you, but is there really a law saying I can't give food away?

dmp

Jacked UP BBQ
10-07-2009, 02:37 PM
If a team cannot pass a health inspection, for basic sanitation, they have no right serving the food to the judges, imo. As far as the vending and advertising championship bbq, most vendors are well decorated competitors and yes there food may not be what they serve for comps, but usually is pretty decent. I know one things certain, I eat what I vend at comps, but I do not eat my comp food.

AzQer
10-07-2009, 04:19 PM
I think we have to be very careful with the public because the promoter and sponsors that are funding the event are hopeing the public can not only have a good time but within the guidlines of the event ie: team samples, as stated vendor for the most part are not comp teams so the public is all for samples. I think if they know up front there is a small fee and usually half the money goes to charity they are more then happy to ablidge. We are in the process of tring to put together a charity BBQ for a school and we are tring to get the community to come out, this is a very difficult thing during these times. As for carshows and t-shirts they are the things that go good with BBQ and you have to come up with ideas to get the public to come to support the charity of the event. Again just let them know up front
just my .02

Uncle Buds BBQ
10-07-2009, 05:37 PM
Dear Kind Folks,

Uncle Bud and his kin would like to thank ya’ll for letting us compete in this here BBQ cook off. Ifin this is ya’lls first time to one of these cook contest we thought it may help ya to know some things.

We had to pay an entry fee to come here and try to win one of them little plastic trophies. We aint complain in cause we had the money since Junior decided he didn’t need to get this teeth straighten since they were all a fallen out anyway. But we really can’t be letting ya try our BBQ. And the folks that are a sellin the BBQ get might mad at us if we did. And we had to buy all of the meat since the twister came and took all the livestock.

Ifin ya got questions bout our cookers or how we make our BBQ just ask. We love to talk about it but not when we’re a trying to get it ready fer the judging. That’s between bout 11am and 1:30pm. Any other time we are glad to talk to ya.

Uncle Bud

ique
10-07-2009, 06:01 PM
Copy, paste, sent to Kinkos for a banner :lol:



Dear Kind Folks,

Uncle Bud and his kin would like to thank ya’ll for letting us compete in this here BBQ cook off. Ifin this is ya’lls first time to one of these cook contest we thought it may help ya to know some things.

We had to pay an entry fee to come here and try to win one of them little plastic trophies. We aint complain in cause we had the money since Junior decided he didn’t need to get this teeth straighten since they were all a fallen out anyway. But we really can’t be letting ya try our BBQ. And the folks that are a sellin the BBQ get might mad at us if we did. And we had to buy all of the meat since the twister came and took all the livestock.

Ifin ya got questions bout our cookers or how we make our BBQ just ask. We love to talk about it but not when we’re a trying to get it ready fer the judging. That’s between bout 11am and 1:30pm. Any other time we are glad to talk to ya.

Uncle Bud

beardjp
10-07-2009, 09:16 PM
Thanks to everyone for their views!!!:-P Our competition is 10/16 - 17 so I will be pulling this together this weekend. I will make sure a copy is put out on the Brethren. I know this subject has been discussed many times.

Nelsonville had 18 teams last year and we sported a good crowd of well behaved public on the Public Square to watch. This year we are looking at 50 teams, and I am sure that the public will increase along with the teams. We have always told people that samples are up to the teams, and we do not advertise them any free food. We are just rying to head off some of the horror stories we hear from everyone.

Our main objective is to teach the public about competitive BBQ. This is our events 13th year and the public is just realizing that we are here. We are not sure if this is good or bad but we will handle it either way.

beardjp
10-11-2009, 05:42 PM
Here is a link to the final product, "BBQ Competition Etiquett for the Viewing Public".

http://www.nelsonvillefd.org/BBQ%20Competition%20Etiquette.pdf

BowtieBill
10-11-2009, 07:58 PM
Dear Kind Folks,

Uncle Bud and his kin would like to thank ya’ll for letting us compete in this here BBQ cook off. Ifin this is ya’lls first time to one of these cook contest we thought it may help ya to know some things.

We had to pay an entry fee to come here and try to win one of them little plastic trophies. We aint complain in cause we had the money since Junior decided he didn’t need to get this teeth straighten since they were all a fallen out anyway. But we really can’t be letting ya try our BBQ. And the folks that are a sellin the BBQ get might mad at us if we did. And we had to buy all of the meat since the twister came and took all the livestock.

Ifin ya got questions bout our cookers or how we make our BBQ just ask. We love to talk about it but not when we’re a trying to get it ready fer the judging. That’s between bout 11am and 1:30pm. Any other time we are glad to talk to ya.

Uncle Bud

Love this!

Hugh Jorgan
10-11-2009, 08:37 PM
Honestly, a lot of the potential misunderstanding by the public that we've seen has been engendered by the event promoters. The practice of running local ads that proclaim "Come and taste championship barbecue!" clearly lead the public to believe they're going to eat, and most of them further assume they'll eat FREE from competitors, not paying vendors for what is clearly not competition food.


:lol: So true.

swamprb
10-12-2009, 11:11 AM
I absolutely hated the fact that some of the events we cooked this past year turned into "Charity Events" and the ensuing health dept. regulations or meat prepping rules were delivered via 11th hour E-mails. Most of them were not included in the registrations, and though I pissed and moaned about it we always did pretty good, but dealing with the public that had paid to sample was just another thing that strengthened us as a team and made us slightly better cooks forcing us to pay closer attention to details and such at turn in time. JD absolutely loves handing out samples, but you'll hear me muttering "fark the samples-I came here to win!".

This comp, we were set up facing the crowd due to the wind, and it was a PITA trying to get our boxes ready with the lines of people waiting.

http://i163.photobucket.com/albums/t310/swamprb/bigline1.jpg

People stood for a half hour, while we were putzin' with the boxes. All in all the majority of the folks were pretty cool, they just expected more given the media hype.

http://i163.photobucket.com/albums/t310/swamprb/bigline2.jpg

At a Canadian comp, there was a live band and an emcee that was really good at describing to the crowd what we cooks were doing and that we were'nt ignoring them, but focused on the turn ins as it was crunch time and he was taking a lot of pressure off us by doing that. It was something I'd never witnessed cooking, he must have done his speil every half hour, and the crowd was very thankful when we did put out the samples. People just don't have a clue.

Alexa RnQ
10-12-2009, 02:28 PM
there was a live band and an emcee that was really good at describing to the crowd what we cooks were doing and that we were'nt ignoring them, but focused on the turn ins as it was crunch time and he was taking a lot of pressure off us by doing that. It was something I'd never witnessed cooking, he must have done his speil every half hour
That's cool, that would be so helpful.

We also found that it helped to give people a specific time, saying something like "Ribs will be out at 12:30" if we have the boys with us to hand them out, or letting them know that everything would be available shortly after 1:30 if we were on our own.

For those events where we do vend, several people have told us that they were specifically advised to come look us up to try our food -- so it's nice for us to accommodate them by letting them know what time works for us, they can't help not knowing what the turn-in schedule is or how many pairs of hands we do (or don't) have on a particular day.