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Chipper
09-22-2009, 06:35 AM
I heard that some of the "seasoned" judges look at the rib bones after a bite to see how quickly they turn white.
I'd love to know why that would matter (if it does) and what it means.

Lake Dogs
09-22-2009, 06:56 AM
more than anything else, means that it was cooked long enough, properly.

QN
09-22-2009, 08:54 AM
From the CD that is played at every judge's meeting; these are the KCBS guidelines for competition ribs.
Judging pork ribs can be very subjective. However, when judging competition ribs you
must consider a few factors. When sampling a properly cooked contest rib the area of the
meat where the bite is taken should be pulled cleanly from the bone with very little effort.
The exposed bone of a well cooked rib will often dry immediately. Ribs should be moist,
flavorful and possess good texture. They can be presented with or without sauce. Ribs
may be presented in single or multi bone presentation. Any questions should be directed
to the KCBS Contest Representative. When a rib is overcooked most or all of the meat
comes off the bone when sampled. Additionally the meat of an overcooked rib has a
tendency to be mushy and have a poor texture.

Skip
09-22-2009, 09:03 AM
I never heard it described as turning white. What I did hear was that older judges would look to see how quickly the bone dried out. Some would even wear a watch with a second hand to time it. Every once in a while you will see a judge look at his watch when sampling ribs. The drying time was a guage used to determine doneness. I believe they shy away from teaching new judges that way. Although I don't think they discourage older judges for still using it.

Jeff_in_KC
09-22-2009, 09:11 AM
White or dry bones and meat not all falling off when bitten were just a couple of things that were only Ed Roith's opinion. Somehow it became part of the judging process. Best I remember it was never something that was officially adopted.

dmprantz
09-22-2009, 09:55 AM
So let me get this strait: Judges are suggested to look at the bone to judge ribs? I would think that the meat would be the subject of judging.

Lake Dogs
09-22-2009, 10:06 AM
So let me get this strait: Judges are suggested to look at the bone to judge ribs? I would think that the meat would be the subject of judging.

No. However, if you go to bite the meat or pull it from the bone and it
comes off cleanly with only a little resistance, then the bone will turn
white. Why they're timing how long it takes is beyond me. Most take
about a minute to turn white...

musicmanryann
09-22-2009, 11:07 AM
No. However, if you go to bite the meat or pull it from the bone and it
comes off cleanly with only a little resistance, then the bone will turn
white. Why they're timing how long it takes is beyond me. Most take
about a minute to turn white...

I agree that it doesn't make sense to time how long it takes to dry. If it pulls cleanly it will dry. The amount of time it takes to dry could be affected by numerous variables having nothing to do with the tenderness of the meat, namely--ambient humidity, temperature and wind speed.

dmprantz
09-22-2009, 12:05 PM
I can understand the pull from the bone being important, but my opinion, such as it is, is that any judge, seasoned or not, who is seen staring at the the bone to determine rib scores should get a talking to from the TC or Rep. Judge the meat. Am I off base here?

Lake Dogs
09-22-2009, 12:10 PM
I can understand the pull from the bone being important, but my opinion, such as it is, is that any judge, seasoned or not, who is seen staring at the the bone to determine rib scores should get a talking to from the TC or Rep. Judge the meat. Am I off base here?

No, you're not off base. Luckily I personally haven't seen anyone judge
a bone... But, it is a tell-tale sign that it was cooked properly.