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wickedbbq'r
09-01-2009, 11:11 AM
As I am getting ready for our first competetion, I'm trying to put together a timeline. And my question is, lets say the turn in time for ribs is 3:00. At what time do you pull them off the grill to have enough time to cut, prep the boxes, and turn them in? And do you allow the same amount of time for chicken? Thanks! :confused:

Jeff Hughes
09-01-2009, 11:14 AM
I try to go from the pit to the cutting board to the box to turnin in less than five minutes...

That will be tough to do in your first comp...

MilitantSquatter
09-01-2009, 11:15 AM
Make sure the garnish is done early that morning or the night before..

each category may have a different window needed based on how much you are cooking/qty need to sort through and how you wish to present in the box. Each category has different needs too.. some just take longer than others.

For a first contest..start with taking the meat out about 15-20 minutes before turn in.. better to be ready a bit early than get DQ'd. As you get more experience, you can narrow down the window a bit (depending once again on how much you cook and how you plan to arrange the box)

I would strongly suggest doing a test run at home to get some timing down..rather than work solely off a timeline.

Poker Smoker
09-01-2009, 11:26 AM
Start from the turn-in time and work backwards. Once you are at the contest, measure the time it takes to get from your cook spot to the turn in spot and then time it in the reverse direction. Calculate the walk time into your prep window (time that meats hits the cutting board, sliced and boxed)

musicmanryann
09-01-2009, 11:37 AM
We start our turn-in process for all meats 15 minutes to dead on turn-in time. We also try to turn-in as close to that dead on time as possible.

Alexa RnQ
09-01-2009, 11:40 AM
I would strongly suggest doing a test run at home to get some timing down..rather than work solely off a timeline.
This. How long it takes on somebody else's timeline is irrelevant, if it takes you a longer or shorter time to do it yourself.

When you practice at home, how long does it take you to cut pretty comp-style ribs that you'd be proud to put in a box? Do a practice box or two, so you're not doing it totally cold on comp day, and see how long it takes you to put the ribs in the way you'd like to present them. Once you have an idea of how long it's going to take you to get through the pure mechanics of cutting and boxing, then work your backtiming.

This gets adjusted as you go along. At one point, VQ and I found ourselves standing and staring at the clock, so clearly we'd gotten competent on the existing timeline and could adjust it some.

PatioDaddio
09-01-2009, 11:48 AM
I also shoot for a 15-minute timeframe from cooker to board to box. I try to reserve the last five minutes of the turn-in window as an insurance policy (buffer time in case I need it).

It really does depend on your experience, speed and attention-to-detail. Using ribs as an example, it takes experience cutting them properly to get good at it. The more you do it, the faster you get at it.

Your first time out I would allow more time. It's better to have it and not need it than to need it and not have it.

John

musicmanryann
09-01-2009, 11:59 AM
This gets adjusted as you go along. At one point, VQ and I found ourselves standing and staring at the clock, so clearly we'd gotten competent on the existing timeline and could adjust it some.

I would agree with that. We have adjusted slightly over the season as well. Usually just a minute or two added or subtracted.

Some may disagree, but you do want to make sure you are not spending too much time from cooker to judges table. The warmer you can turn in the meat, the better. In other words, be thorough with turn-in prep, but also be efficient.

early mornin' smokin'
09-01-2009, 12:06 PM
our plan is to have the ribs in the cambro about 30 minutes before turn in, unglazed, ready to be put on a grill to caramelize the sauce. It gives some room for error, and lets the meat rest a bit out of the smoker.

Tweedle
09-01-2009, 12:49 PM
Wicked, what is your first event? Just wondering as we also havce our first event coming up this month. We had a complete run thru last week and it took longer than I thought to get everyting set and into the boxes. I planned on 15 min and it too us 30 so we ajusted our time accordingly. I mad up a speard sheet in excel and just typed in times and what had to get done and have since gone back and changed it to what happened in our run thru.
We havent done any comps yet but we are going thru the same thing as you guys so I fig I'd let you know what we have been doing. This site and all of the people on here have been a huge help! dont for get a checklist!

Lake Dogs
09-01-2009, 01:41 PM
With a 30 minute window between turn-ins, I do it much like early-morning. We
bring them off (the ribs) a little early, allow them to cool a little before saucing and
slicing. We've timed it ourselves, we needed about 35 minutes to do it how we'd like
to do it. Even shaving a few minutes, there's really no choice for us but to do some
of it (prep) ahead of time.

Lake Dogs
09-01-2009, 01:45 PM
Wicked, what is your first event? Just wondering as we also havce our first event coming up this month. We had a complete run thru last week and it took longer than I thought to get everyting set and into the boxes. I planned on 15 min and it too us 30 so we ajusted our time accordingly. I mad up a speard sheet in excel and just typed in times and what had to get done and have since gone back and changed it to what happened in our run thru.
We havent done any comps yet but we are going thru the same thing as you guys so I fig I'd let you know what we have been doing. This site and all of the people on here have been a huge help! dont for get a checklist!

I have a check-list that I modify depending on turn-in times. It's listed like:

7:00am do this guy 1
7:10am do that guy 2
7:30am something else guy 1

Many of our activities overlap. Other activities are shared. However, for
me, I would've been screwed more than a few times if I didn't list it by
TIME. I check them off as I go.

Tweedle
09-01-2009, 02:08 PM
Check list for gear to bring

spread sheet with time and task columns for what to do once the chicken gets it head cut off

:oops:

bam
09-01-2009, 02:12 PM
Might want add time to walk to judges table.

Jacked UP BBQ
09-01-2009, 02:21 PM
Don't over think it. It is not hard. Just keep track of time and you will be fine. I like my ribs to rest so I go at least 25 minutes when I pull them. You will be fine.

CivilWarBBQ
09-01-2009, 02:39 PM
For your first contest you will probably be dealing with a jillion unexpected things, so I would shoot for the beginning of the turn-in window and give yourself extra time. Temp of the meat is not *supposed* to be a factor in KCBS judging, so it's not the end of the world if your box is ready a few minutes early, but if you are one second late it's game over.

Bentley
09-01-2009, 03:08 PM
Make sure the garnish is done early that morning or the night before..


Good Point.

Once you are at the contest, measure the time it takes to get from your cook spot to the turn in spot and then time it in the reverse direction.

Another good point.


Don't over think it. It is not hard.


Yes and no. Things will pop up as you re doing the box, just happens.

Speaking as a competitor and a CBJ, dont worry about the temperature of the meat when it is judged. Outside of chicken, most of the other meast are slices or individual pieces and by the time it hits the table it is warm or room temp anyway. Figure 10-15 mints.

bodcat
09-01-2009, 09:22 PM
I gave us 30 minutes for each category at our first competition and was way early on ribs and chicken and about right on pork and brisket. We have done 3 competitions now and do 15 minutes rib/chicken, 25 minutes pork/brisket.

wickedbbq'r
09-01-2009, 10:09 PM
Tweedle, our first event is the Westport Blues, Views, and BBQ in Westport, CT. We have done 3 practices so far and it has been taking between 20 to 30 minutes. I was worried about the food being cold when it got to the judges table. Thanks everyone for the heads up and the advice. It is a big help.

Tweedle
09-02-2009, 07:41 PM
Tweedle, our first event is the Westport Blues, Views, and BBQ in Westport, CT. We have done 3 practices so far and it has been taking between 20 to 30 minutes. I was worried about the food being cold when it got to the judges table. Thanks everyone for the heads up and the advice. It is a big help.


Good luck in your first Comp! I was worried about that as well so i did a test on my cooler to see how quick the temps dropped just in case we are done ealy any have to hold it for a wile, and from what I here on her hot is good but on time is better lol :biggrin:

Capt ron
09-02-2009, 09:44 PM
Make sure you do a test run at home using the time that is normally used (12 pm, 12:30pm, 1pm, & 1:30pm). It helped us out a lot. Also, don't forget about a resting time to be add in from cooker to box calculations...

Good luck and have fun!:-D