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big blue bbq
01-18-2009, 04:24 PM
Question for CBJ's:

I went to 17th street bar and grill in Murphysboro Il. last night for dinner. Drove about 3.5 hours to get there. I had ribs and brisket, lovely wife had ribs and pork. I thought the ribs are good, brisket real good. She thought ribs ok but did not like his sauce, pork was dry and not real flavorful.
I know it must be tough to cook for the masses, but my question is, even when I cook for 110 people my pork is juicy and has a lot of flavor. I have only placed in pork once. Is it possible to have too much flavor? Are the judges looking for more of a traditional pork, or is the flavor important as well.
My wife said she would rather have my pork, I don't think she was just being nice:icon_blush:, since she only ate one rib and a couple bites of the pork.

bigabyte
01-18-2009, 04:44 PM
I'm not a CBJ, but how expensive per serving is it when you make flavorful pork for 110 people? Then figure out how much you would have to upcharge to maintain a restaurant and see how it compares.

Rodsboots
01-18-2009, 05:10 PM
My 2 Cents....

I think no matter the amount of people you're cooking for you should always put passion into what you're doing otherwise it's just a job and the end product will show that.

again my 2 cents....

MilitantSquatter
01-18-2009, 05:20 PM
" Is it possible too have too much flavor ?"

IMO, it's definitely possible. Flavor is a very generic term. What is positively flavorful to one person make not be to someone else.

I'm sure whatever rub you use has a variety of flavors. If one or more of them is too overpowering, making the final product seem out of balance and also potentially lessing the actual taste of the pork, that could certainly have a negative impact of the taste scores.

HBMTN
01-18-2009, 07:18 PM
Another thing to consider is when you cook for 110 people they are eating it around the prime time after it is cooked. In the restaurant world they cook with out knowing how many people and when they will come into the restaurant. Could have been setting around at holding temp for a while. Just a thought.

Bigdog
01-18-2009, 07:33 PM
They are 2 completely different animals.

CTSmokehouse
01-18-2009, 08:46 PM
Saturday Night...They should be right on....

Give them another chance...

Yours in BBQ,

Cliff

ThomEmery
01-18-2009, 08:53 PM
Another thing to consider is when you cook for 110 people they are eating it around the prime time after it is cooked. In the restaurant world they cook with out knowing how many people and when they will come into the restaurant. Could have been setting around at holding temp for a while. Just a thought.

Bingo

CTSmokehouse
01-18-2009, 08:57 PM
Bingo


That's right...

michiana mark
01-19-2009, 10:22 AM
Saw Mike Mills on some Travel Channel special. He stated that they always cook "competition" style. But then again he didn't say how long they held it too.

Went into a Famous Dave's one time and had a terrible meal, about 7 pm. Went into another Famous Dave's for lunch and had a terrific meal. It's all about the timing.

I love pulled pork freshly pulled. Once it's been refrigerated and reheated, not so much. Just my .02

Bigdog
01-19-2009, 10:34 AM
Saw Mike Mills on some Travel Channel special. He stated that they always cook "competition" style. But then again he didn't say how long they held it too.

Went into a Famous Dave's one time and had a terrible meal, about 7 pm. Went into another Famous Dave's for lunch and had a terrific meal. It's all about the timing.

I love pulled pork freshly pulled. Once it's been refrigerated and reheated, not so much. Just my .02

Agreed. Very hard to be consistant if you serve both lunch and dinner and everything in between.

Bigmista
01-19-2009, 11:02 AM
I tell my customers to come to the Farmers Market early to get their BBQ. It's just better than at the end of the day when it's been held. I can stagger things like ribs, sausage and chicken so it's coming out constantly during the day but that's almost impossible with brisket and pulled pork.

big blue bbq
01-19-2009, 12:12 PM
Thanks for the answers. I am mainly just trying to figure out if I am doing too much to the meat I cook for contest. I was injecting with some blues hog and then doing the rub. I really like it, but if the judges are looking more for just smoked meat finished product I could be doing more than I should.

big blue bbq
01-19-2009, 12:14 PM
I tell my customers to come to the Farmers Market early to get their BBQ. It's just better than at the end of the day when it's been held. I can stagger things like ribs, sausage and chicken so it's coming out constantly during the day but that's almost impossible with brisket and pulled pork.


Like Mista said you can do the ribs and chicken staggers. The finished product on the ribs and brisket was really done right. Brisket maybe a little to tender, but the ribs were perfect done.

Bentley
01-19-2009, 03:13 PM
Another thing to consider is when you cook for 110 people they are eating it around the prime time after it is cooked. In the restaurant world they cook with out knowing how many people and when they will come into the restaurant. Could have been setting around at holding temp for a while. Just a thought.


I think that statement right there is why it is almost impossible to compare competition flavor to restaurant flavor. But I am also going on a crawl this weekend and I will probably use the competition criteria...how else would one judge BBQ?

Divemaster
01-20-2009, 02:52 PM
They are 2 completely different animals.

I couldn't agree more...