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flexo
08-13-2008, 08:02 PM
I am having a hard time scoring in chicken. I am using chicken thighs, they are fresh, never frozen thighs. Is i best to brine, inject or just rub? Should I cook at a higher heat? I neeeeeed heeeeellllppp

HeSmellsLikeSmoke
08-13-2008, 08:08 PM
If you haven't already, do a google search for "jumping jim's chicken" Many successful competitors use methods very close to this.

HolySmoke
08-13-2008, 08:13 PM
How do you cook them now?

BBQ Grail
08-13-2008, 08:15 PM
How do you cook them now?

Poorly!

flexo
08-13-2008, 08:26 PM
I am cooking them with the ribs on our pit. The temp is 230. I have tried rubs. Rubs and brine. Sauce and no sauce.

HolySmoke
08-13-2008, 08:35 PM
Poorly!

I thought i might have set that up to be said :icon_blush:

flexo
08-13-2008, 08:38 PM
That was silly!! LOL

HolySmoke
08-13-2008, 08:42 PM
Are you using your own rub? Do you trim them nice? Is the skin to rubbery? there are plenty of threads for chicken around here as well as pics to compare what other people are cooking to what you have been producing.

flexo
08-13-2008, 08:45 PM
I do my own rub. (that may be part of the problem) The skin is rubbery :( I am looking at the other threads as well.

HolySmoke
08-13-2008, 08:48 PM
Good luck, let us know how it works out! Post pics.

flexo
08-13-2008, 08:49 PM
Will do!! Thanks for the help so far!!!

KC_Bobby
08-13-2008, 09:37 PM
Flexo, don't feel bad - my chicken sucks too. All I've learned is that dry overcooked chicken scores better then chewy undercooked chicken.

Thus, going forward I'm going to start wrapping my chicken in foil and drop in it among the coals about 11:45 if it's in question. :mad:

CivilWarBBQ
08-13-2008, 11:06 PM
I once did detailed experiments brining thighs. I took a large pack and added them to a simple brine, two every half hour. Then all were cooked at the same time and temp. Upon sampling, I found that there was no noticeable difference in the tenderness or moisture between any of the thighs, although the flavor was altered more the longer the chicken was in the brine.

Based on this test I reserve brining for white meat poultry where it is much more effective.

Jeff_in_KC
08-13-2008, 11:12 PM
If your chicken skin is rubbery and you're cooking at 230, I'm gonna guess that's a big part of the skin issue. Crank up your heat. The ribs can take it too.

PatioDaddio
08-14-2008, 01:07 AM
Flexo? Do I know you? :wink:

Brine and higher temps (275*-300*) are your friends, my brother.

John

butts
08-14-2008, 07:10 AM
I once did detailed experiments brining thighs. I took a large pack and added them to a simple brine, two every half hour. Then all were cooked at the same time and temp. Upon sampling, I found that there was no noticeable difference in the tenderness or moisture between any of the thighs, although the flavor was altered more the longer the chicken was in the brine.

Based on this test I reserve brining for white meat poultry where it is much more effective.


I think that the "flavor" part of that quote is the key. While brining may not alter the moisture of chicken thighs it can alter the flavor of chicken thighs which it why I brine my chicken thighs. Think flavor brine instead of brining for moisture. I know that a lot of teams use Italian dressing to marinate but that has never worked for me.

PatioDaddio
08-14-2008, 08:18 AM
I think that the "flavor" part of that quote is the key. While brining may not alter the moisture of chicken thighs it can alter the flavor of chicken thighs which it why I brine my chicken thighs. Think flavor brine instead of brining for moisture. I know that a lot of teams use Italian dressing to marinate but that has never worked for me.Exactly. I use brining as my means of injecting flavor, but I do tend to notice a bit more moisture as well. Perhaps it's not so much that it adds moisture, but it definitely helps it retain moisture.

I recommend a little lighter brine (1/2 c salt & 3/4 c to 1 gal), and let the chicken soak for 4-6 hours (preferably the latter). Pat the thighs dry, sprinkle lightly with your favorite rub and cook at 275* - 300*. Mine take right at three hours, including a 30-minute glazing process at the end.

It just flat works every time for me.

I hope this helps,
John

CivilWarBBQ
08-14-2008, 12:27 PM
I recommend a little lighter brine (1/2 c salt & 3/4 c to 1 gal),

I don't think he can follow that recipe.

3/4 cup of what, John?

afreemaniii
08-14-2008, 01:44 PM
My guess is sugar, but I don't know.

We cook our chicken low as well, somewhere between 225-240. We do crisp the skin on a weber kettle right before final glazing and boxing.

I don't think he can follow that recipe.

3/4 cup of what, John?

PatioDaddio
08-14-2008, 02:38 PM
I don't think he can follow that recipe. 3/4 cup of what, John?Eye of Newt. :shock: :-D Sorry, sugar.

John

Jeff_in_KC
08-14-2008, 09:31 PM
I don't think he can follow that recipe.

3/4 cup of what, John?

A little vinegar doesn't hurt. :wink: