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Roo-B-Q'N
11-01-2007, 04:01 PM
Turkey day is just around the corner and a few people have assked if I would cook their turkeys for them. I am a somewhat hesitant to do so becuase of the timing issues.
I know once the bird is cooked, it needs to be cooled down to 70 degrees within 2 hours and then below 41 in 4.
I have also heard that once chilled, the bird would need to be brought back up to above 140 degrees within one hour.
Are we turkey eaters running a risk when we get the bird to the table and it enters the danger zone so quickly and sits there for so long? If so I am surprised more and more people are not getting sick each holiday.

txschutte
11-01-2007, 09:26 PM
One of the few reasons we are eating prime rib for x-mas.

Plowboy
11-01-2007, 09:34 PM
Doesn't the meat have to be removed from the bone if refrigerated? Maybe an old wives' tale.

Roo-B-Q'N
11-02-2007, 08:41 AM
I guess this is what I am talking about as well. So many trueths, myths and legends that it is hard to say what is correct and what is wrong. This is how people get sick.

parrothead
11-02-2007, 10:10 AM
The cooling times are correct, however, you must bring it back over 160 before serving and hold over 140. There are ways to cool things faster. Ice pack in the cavity and around the bird etc..

As far as setting on the table, well you are good for a couple hours. The bacteria count doubles every 20 minutes. I get stuff put away as fast as possible.

Dave Muscato
11-03-2007, 10:54 PM
Are we turkey eaters running a risk when we get the bird to the table and it enters the danger zone so quickly and sits there for so long? If so I am surprised more and more people are not getting sick each holiday.

The human body is surprisingly resistant to bacteria.

Not that we should risk it, but bacteria is *everywhere.* It's amazing we don't get sick more often no matter how you slice it (har, har).

trekmstr
11-08-2009, 08:46 AM
The real issue it to make sure it is cooked right to begin with. Cook until you get an internal temperature in the thickest part of the thigh (not touching the bone) of 170°F.
I have used my Weber grill with a rotisserie ring for turkeys almost every year for 7 or 8 years now and I still go back and review the Weber web site every year.
It has great guides for figuring your fuel needs and times depending on the size of your bird.
You also want to consider how you are serving it. Some people serve the bird whole and slice at the table. I slice and place on a platter. This takes longer so you need to plan for it. Either way you want everything else to be ready to go at the same time. (that is perhaps the hardest thing… especially if you are waiting on family)
http://weber.com/holidaygrilling/ (http://weber.com/holidaygrilling/)
http://weber.com/holidaygrilling/Tips.aspx (http://weber.com/holidaygrilling/Tips.aspx)