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smoke-n-my-i's
09-22-2007, 10:10 AM
Here is a very basic meat temperature question.

One of the biggest factors in foodborne-illness outbreaks is time-temperature abuse. Disease-causing bacteria microorganisms grow and multiply at temperatures between XX degrees F and XXX degrees F. Whenever food is held in the temperature danger range, it is being abused.

What is the temperature range?

smoke-n-my-i's
09-22-2007, 08:06 PM
I will give you a hint.... so far 4 have voted, 2 are right....:shock: :eek: :rolleyes:

parrothead
09-22-2007, 10:15 PM
None of the above. Below 41 or above 140 is the correct answer.

jgh1204
09-22-2007, 11:19 PM
I have heard 40 to 140 is safe, but 35 to 135 is safer.

smoke-n-my-i's
09-23-2007, 04:20 AM
None of the above. Below 41 or above 140 is the correct answer.

Straight from the book:

Common opportunities for time-temperature abuse throughout the flow of food include:
-- Not cooking food to its required minimum internal temperature
-- Not cooling food properly
-- Failing to reheat food to 165 degrees F for fifteen seconds within two hours
-- Failing to hold food at a minimum internal temperature of 135 degrees F or higher or 41 degrees F or lower


She had to take the course from Servsafe ( I believe that is right)...

parrothead
09-23-2007, 08:57 AM
Just took mine and if I answered 135 on a test, I would have gotten it wrong. I received a 98 on the test. It's pounded in there. At least in Illinois.

There isn't any variance between states is there?

parrothead
09-23-2007, 09:05 AM
We were also told that if holding temp dipped below 140 that we would have to reheat to 165 and it is now considered a left over. I'll dig out my books when I go in tomorrow.

River City Smokehouse
09-23-2007, 09:44 AM
I voted 41-135.

Dovid
09-23-2007, 01:13 PM
Life begins at 40!

bbqjoe
09-23-2007, 03:36 PM
I have the same answer. This has already been discussed in the food handling polls.

smoke-n-my-i's
09-23-2007, 05:00 PM
We were also told that if holding temp dipped below 140 that we would have to reheat to 165 and it is now considered a left over. I'll dig out my books when I go in tomorrow.

That is correct... give him a gold star! ! !

MileHighSmoker
09-23-2007, 05:03 PM
I was close... at least I errored on the side of caution

smoke-n-my-i's
09-23-2007, 05:06 PM
I have the same answer. This has already been discussed in the food handling polls.

Sorry for the duplication. I found some other threads after posting this one. Being rather new here, and still finding stuff, I will refrain for now until I find some of the rest.

My settings were for only to see 2 months, and when I changed it to the beginning, WOW, there they were. Some are way back.....

Bill

parrothead
09-24-2007, 09:27 AM
Just looked all through the book. It says 140 all over it. Thought so.

Now, does this mean that there are variants from state to state?

bbqjoe
09-24-2007, 11:38 AM
Just looked all through the book. It says 140 all over it. Thought so.

Now, does this mean that there are variants from state to state?
Greg, You are correct. There are variances from state to state. Why? You got me. It would seem the same risks would be associated with the same foods no matter what state you are in.
Take California for example, then again let's not..........

But seriously, We can safely concur that above 41 is the entrance point to the "Danger Zone" I would err on the side of caution and go with a lower high point, but that is not to say that anything above 135 is out of the Zone.
If this makes any sense.

parrothead
09-24-2007, 11:56 AM
Bacillus cereus(toxin) grows to 131 F. That isn't much room to spare.

Smokin Gator
09-24-2007, 11:58 AM
I voted for the one with 140 but also thought the lower number was 40.

bbqjoe
09-24-2007, 12:22 PM
This is kind of a double standard, and it is a matter of how you interpret it or see it.
Food that has been left in the danger zone for four hours is considered to be unsafe. That is food that once may have been cooled to 40° or below and has been allowed to rise. I would say that food that has reached the point of 130°-135° at the four hour window would be highly suspect for bacterial growth.
But say you personally set your standard at 125° your product would not reach the standard maximum before being discarded.
Again on the same note, we know that reheated food needs to reach 165° for at least two minutes inside of two hours (IIRC)
And then be held at a minimum of 145°.
I don't know if I'm saying this quite right, but I am saying that food left out should not be allowed to get anywhere near 135° or 140°. And food that has been cooked should not be allowed to fall below 145°.

smoke-n-my-i's
10-02-2007, 06:09 PM
sure sounds like a double standard... you would think that it would be national, not state or regional.

Here is the original question:
What is the danger temperature zone temperature?

Here is the exact wording from the book we have:
One of the biggest factors in foodborne-illness outbreaks is time-temperature abuse. Disease-causing microorganisms grow and multiply at temperatures between 41 degrees F and 135 degrees F (5 degrees C and 57 degrees C), which is why this range is known as the temperature danger zone.

This is from the ServSafe Essentials 3rd Edition page 5-5.

Am I misreading it, or is yours different? ? ? ?

Bill

smoke-n-my-i's
10-26-2007, 02:49 PM
here is the answer to our question, and yes it does vary from what I see.

Know your state's regulatory requirements.

For the sake of your entire operation, it's critical that each instructor knows their individual state's food safety training requirements, and abides by them. These regulations can vary from state to state and sometimes by county or city.




http://www.servsafe.com/FoodSafety/regulations/

Rockaway BeachBQ
03-11-2008, 01:00 AM
And this all turns in to a nightmare when you try to figure out the laws regarding cooking and holding rare roast beef. I don't think the Health Department inspectors even understand the regulations.