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Greatgrills
02-23-2007, 09:51 PM
What would you consider some of the selling points of a cooking class??? Let's say that Joe Blow wants to put on a class what would you expect out of it??? Would you want to do the whole KCBS contest times(someone doing the cooking), would you want just an overview(short version of a KCBS contest), or would you want to bring your own pits, meats, rubs, everything YOU would use at a contest, ect???? Have seen so many cooking classes out there and they all offer something different.. Just wondering what your selling points are:-P

chad
02-23-2007, 10:22 PM
I took Myron Mixon's class in 2005. It was the best $500 I ever spent on a hobby weekend. Full KCBS/FBA schedule, chalk talk with him, David Hare, James Britt, and Buster Dunn. Friday evening until Sunday afternoon.

No "secret squirrel" stuff...plain talk, straight answers, etc.

He now does whole hog at almost every class...I'm thinking of taking it again just to get that...

Greatgrills
02-23-2007, 10:26 PM
I took Myron Mixon's class in 2005. It was the best $500 I ever spent on a hobby weekend. Full KCBS/FBA schedule, chalk talk with him, David Hare, James Britt, and Buster Dunn. Friday evening until Sunday afternoon.

No "secret squirrel" stuff...plain talk, straight answers, etc.

He now does whole hog at almost every class...I'm thinking of taking it again just to get that...

Would love to see and learn how to do a whole hog...

ggriffi
02-23-2007, 10:44 PM
What would you consider some of the selling points of a cooking class??? Let's say that Joe Blow wants to put on a class what would you expect out of it??? Would you want to do the whole KCBS contest times(someone doing the cooking), would you want just an overview(short version of a KCBS contest), or would you want to bring your own pits, meats, rubs, everything YOU would use at a contest, ect???? Have seen so many cooking classes out there and they all offer something different.. Just wondering what your selling points are:-P

Mark,

The class that I took last year was done by Texas RibRangers (Bill & Barbara Milroy) and if I remember correctly, I found it on the KCBS website. I took it because I wanted to try a competition and figured that I could learn some things that I did not know about the "in & outs" of a competition. Most of the people there were wanting to learn about competitions. Some of the things we were shown was how to trim and prep all of the meats, approx. cooking times for meat based on pit temps, and "how to" prep turn in boxes. I could have brought my pit but elected not to, and all of the meat was included in the cost of the class which I felt was a bonus. In addition we cooked our lunch which was not any of the four meats for a comp but things you might que for family and friends. Bill and Barb did a very good job, IMO of putting on the class as far as presentation and for those of us in the class it was very "hands on" also. All in all I was very satisfied with the class because the things that I was looking to learn about, prepping meat and turn in boxes was covered very well.

hope this helps you,

gary

DeanC
02-24-2007, 06:01 PM
I took the Fast Eddy class in December. I choose it because I was looking for tips and tricks with the FE. Really enjoyed it, not only did I learn a lot about my smoker but Eddy and Paul Schatte shared a lot of great information. The difference in cooking styles was very interesting. Cost was also a big factor, it was more within my budget than some of the others.

Double D's BBQ
02-24-2007, 07:48 PM
Hi Dean,

I was at Fast Eddy's class last December also. For those that have not attended a class, I thought dollar for dollar it was probably the best class I've attended. I've also attended Myron Mixon's class and it was excellent also at 2.5 times the cost. Next month I'll be attending Mike Davis's class in Lynchburg. To me the best part of these classes other than learning different techniques is just hanging out with these Champions and shooting the bull about Barbecue. Myron and Eddy were very easy to talk to and would answer any questions you might have supplemented with some great stories. I highly encourage anyone looking to shorten their learning curve to attend any of these classes and learn from the masters. They are well worth the time and money invested.

Dallas

Sawdustguy
02-24-2007, 09:09 PM
Unless you had impeccable credentials, it would be very difficult for you to attract an audience to a class you would give. If you have been looking at some of the cooking classes that will take place and some of the brethren will attend, they are classes given by the big guns like Paul Kirk, Dr, BBQ, Mike Davis, Miron Mixon, Lite my Fire etc. These are some of the heavy weights who have won time after time on the BBQ Circuit today and in the past. Unless your team has these types of credentials it is difficult to attract audience. I chose to attend Dr. BBQ's class because we have been finishing between 12th and 15th and we want to move up. I feel that we are at the point where we could use the help to improve our scores. What is wrong with us attempting to improve by attending a class.

Sledneck
02-25-2007, 04:51 AM
At Paul Kirks class i learned very little but had a great time hanging out with all of the brethren in a great location.Did get to pick pauls brain a little which was worth it, had i travelled and went with nobody i knew it would of sucked

Kung Fu BBQ
02-25-2007, 08:15 AM
i took one class and thought it was a complete waste of time. The only thing I really came away with was making turn in boxes look damn good.
The class was quick, and there wasn't really much going on with it. We cooked our own ribs and chicken during the course and then he fed us some of his brisket... looks across the room were made as many realized it wasn't that good.

I'd love to take a class from one of the big dogs or do something with a group.

SmokeInDaEye
02-25-2007, 03:17 PM
I would take a class like the good Doc's in the future, but having only done 1 contest so far, I would rather spend my time and money getting real experience.

ThomEmery
02-25-2007, 04:06 PM
These classes have lots of value I was in AZ with QN4U this weekend
We have Chris Lilly coming into Calif in July It just cuts your learning curve
down

Muzzlebrake
02-26-2007, 09:21 AM
I went to a class last year given by Mike Lee of the Yankee BBQ team (another one, not our own YankeeBBQ) and thought that it helped me with how a contest is run but did not do anything for my cooking skills.

That being said, I think that is kind of the purpose of the class and it performed its mission fairly well (another of my classmates seemed to have good success last year). We did not do any cooking but were given demos on butchering, site setups, equipment and turn in boxes.

The class was also very inexpensive and I think a great way to get your feet a little wet without a huge cost. I would recommend it to anyone that doesn't want to spend a bunch of money, yet still get some idea of how to compete. I think that $200 to $500 for an introductory class can be intiimidating.

I am looking forward to the Dr BBQ Brethern Class this March and think that I will be learning much more about cooking there.

I just completed the KCBS Judge certification Class this past weekend and have to say that I did not learn nearly as much as would have liked to in that class. I can however now come over and officially judge. So if anyone within a reasonable distance from me has some extra and needs a "certified judges opinion" I will bring the beer. LOL

cmcadams
02-26-2007, 09:25 AM
I would take a class like the good Doc's in the future, but having only done 1 contest so far, I would rather spend my time and money getting real experience.

Clint, having only done 5 comps, I'd suggest getting into a class quick... You'll get a huge jumpstart, I think. We're taking Ray's class in April, and I can't wait.

Bigmista
02-26-2007, 09:00 PM
I refuse! I'm gonna do everything the hard way. Gonna bump my head against the wall until it cracks and I break threw!

Oh yeah and I'll keep coming here and learning stuff.

lunchlady
02-27-2007, 02:33 PM
I just completed the KCBS Judge certification Class this past weekend and have to say that I did not learn nearly as much as would have liked to in that class. ...

Hey Sean - I am just wondering what else you wanted to learn about KCBS judging? Not to give you a hard time, I am really wondering. I took that same class before and found it to be very informative.
By the way, I was there too, "volunteering"...wink wink... I didn't realize there were Brethren about or I would've said hello. Next time.

BACK to the cooking classes thread... In order to get someone like Myron , you better be prepared to put out a bunch of cash. But I would expect (and be happy) to do just that to learn ANYTHING from him. There are other classes out there which are WELL WORTH the smaller buck, depending on what you want to learn. Find out ahead of time what they are teaching so you don't get dissappointed. There are some great classes coming up around heah (New England)... competition and non-competition. Keep yer eyes open...

Muzzlebrake
02-27-2007, 06:46 PM
Michelle,
That is too bad...... I should have been a bit more friendly and introduced myself.
Had to think about it for a minute but I guess what I was hoping to learn is what other people's idea of good 'Q is. Make sense?

Sawdustguy
02-28-2007, 12:14 PM
Michelle,
That is too bad...... I should have been a bit more friendly and introduced myself.
Had to think about it for a minute but I guess what I was hoping to learn is what other people's idea of good 'Q is. Make sense?

Judge a few contests and you will find out in short order.

cmcadams
02-28-2007, 12:16 PM
Guy is right... You won't learn a lot just from the class, but you'll learn a lot more when you judge. The class is usually all done with just 1 team doing all the cooking, and trying to highlight flaws.

Muzzlebrake
02-28-2007, 04:49 PM
Judge a few contests and you will find out in short order.
Oh yeah I am sure that I will learn bunches nothing like learning from experience.

Do judges have time to discuss things during the contest like between meats, or do they just tend to hang out and compare notes afterward?

What do you enjoy more? competing or judging?

Sawdustguy
03-01-2007, 09:13 AM
We love cooking. Taking a judges class and judging a contest gave us alot of data on what judges look for at a contest. This helps us during a contest. We also feel we could never learn everything on our own so we decided to take the Dr. BBQ class to see how he does it.

lunchlady
03-01-2007, 02:22 PM
Judges DO have time to talk about stuff AFTER the scoresheets are turned in. I love that part, it is cool to see what everyone thought.
I have seen some judges taking notes, which is a good idea if you are saving them for something (like an article for the NEBS website...heheh), but I, personally, don't do that.

I like judging a lot, it gives me a different perspective and a chance to chat with judges that I would otherwise not be able to talk to. It is usually hard for me to judge since we cook so many contests, but I try to do it at least once or twice a year.

That being said....I LIVE to compete!

Also, don't forget about the NEBS mentoring program for shortening the learning curve! It really works!

Muzzlebrake
03-01-2007, 09:38 PM
We love cooking. Taking a judges class and judging a contest gave us alot of data on what judges look for at a contest. This helps us during a contest. We also feel we could never learn everything on our own so we decided to take the Dr. BBQ class to see how he does it.

that is the very reason that the 3 of us from the team took the class. I am the only one taking the Dr BBQ class.

Also, don't forget about the NEBS mentoring program for shortening the learning curve! It really works!

now why would I want to do that? that wouldnt be nearly as aggravating as going it all alone. nor would it be as rewarding, I am more of a deep end of the dock kinda guy
:-D