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PimpSmoke
11-20-2006, 09:28 AM
OK so I read the mayo thread, since the product in question was essentially mayo (Kraft horseradish sauce). However I didn't see the age question covered so.......

Saturday myself and MrsPimp go to a very well regarded rest. for steak. Long story short I ordered prime rib, rare of course. When my meat got to me I asked for horseradish and they brought me the aftermentioned product. I used it for a while (on french fries) for awhile before I realized that it was warm. So I'm checking the label to see if it requires refrigeration and I see the expire date


11/06/06:icon_smil

WTF! So what do the food safety gurus say about this? Safe or Not?

How dangerous is expired mayo type products?

bbqjoe
11-20-2006, 10:46 AM
First question, did they bring you the whole jar, how were you able to see an expiration date.
Was it previously opened?
I ask this because if it was a new jar, had just been opened, it was probably sitting in a store room and I wouldn't worry about the exp. date all that much,
except for the fact that it doesn't shine a real good light on the facility.

But after my preconceptions about mayo, it seems that it is alot safer than the product of many years ago, or homemade.
Alot of expiration dates have more to do with the manufacturers idea of best flavor by, as compared to unsafe to use after.
Just like your born on date on a can of Bud. It might not taste as good as they think it should after that date, but 20 years from now it's still a can of beer.

Or maybe was it served warm in a nice little compote cup?
No telling how it was handled, but I think a nice restaurant might serve the sauce slightly warmed as compared to ice cold for a nice piece of meat.

But nonetheless, if it wasn't sitting there bubbling like it was fermenting, I'm going to guess you're ok.

Are you???

Wine & Swine
11-20-2006, 11:02 AM
Pimp, I was going to say the same as Joe. Processed bottled products like this are pretty stable (unlike real mayonaise) as everything is pasturized etc. Where you get in trouble is how it is handled. If new bacteria is introduced (through hands or dirty utensil, etc) and the product is left out (temp goes in the danger zone 60F+ where bacteria likes to grow) you can get into trouble. Attached is a chart I found that shows the expiration of products and there life after the expiration. My advise is smell before you taste.
http://www.a1usa.net/gary/expire.html

http://www.a1usa.net/gary/expire.html

PimpSmoke
11-20-2006, 12:07 PM
I didn't get sick, I think.

It may have just been the 16oz. of prime rib that made me a little..........digestive. No trots and no vomiting.

Joe, the bottle was opened and half empty. It had been used. It was on the beverage serving area of the facility. So I saw the date and the refrigerate instructions on the label.

Cool links thanks.

Good to know that its probably safe.

Do you think the Health Dept. would have an issue with this?

Needless to say, I don't think I'll be going back there. If they serve expired mayo type products that are room temp, I'd hate to see the kitchen.

Thanks for the responses.

Bigdog
11-20-2006, 03:35 PM
My take on this is to go another resturant next time. If they are using that stuff as horsey sauce for prime rib, they are taking short cuts elsewhere too. Out of date stuff is a major no-no. That stuff is great on samis but I would not want it on my PR. I prefere a homemade concoction.

PimpSmoke
11-21-2006, 08:05 AM
My take on this is to go another resturant next time. If they are using that stuff as horsey sauce for prime rib, they are taking short cuts elsewhere too. Out of date stuff is a major no-no. That stuff is great on samis but I would not want it on my PR. I prefere a homemade concoction.


Just for the record Bigdog, it was for me french fries. I know, I'm a weirdo. I'd rather use that than ketchup.

I like regular prepared horseradish for the meat, but didn't need any because they serve an awesome au jus (sp) that goes well with the meat.

Wine & Swine
11-21-2006, 10:43 AM
Pimp, good to hear your still alive, try to stay away from the expired condiments for the holidays, please.

timzcardz
11-21-2006, 07:34 PM
Just for the record Bigdog, it was for me french fries. I know, I'm a weirdo. I'd rather use that than ketchup.


Not weird at all. I love horseradish sauce with fries, onion rings, even mozeralla sticks and poppers.

I usually just mix up some mayo, sour cream, horseradish and worcteshire sauce.

With the bottled stuff though, there is no reason that any restaurant should be using something beyond its expired or "best by" date. Glad to hear that you sufferd no ill effects.

JohnMcD348
11-21-2006, 09:16 PM
I don't even bother with the mayo type suace when I go out. I just ask for the ground Horseradish and mix it into the aujoir(sp?) juice and use that as my dip. Good on the fries and the meat. And I can make it as strong or as weak as I want.

Bigdog
11-22-2006, 08:32 AM
Just for the record Bigdog, it was for me french fries. I know, I'm a weirdo. I'd rather use that than ketchup.

I like regular prepared horseradish for the meat, but didn't need any because they serve an awesome au jus (sp) that goes well with the meat.
Thanks for the clarification. Mayo on FF is very European my friend. Learned to love it that way while traveling in France and Amsterdam. Glad to hear that the au jus was awesome. I prefere that on my PR too mixed in with an occasional dip in the sauce.:shock:

BBQchef33
11-22-2006, 09:30 PM
In my book.... the only thing that touches prime rib is my teeth.. :)


Horsey sauce goes great on roast beef sammis.

Boars Head brand (http://www.boarshead.com/DigiCatessen.html) makes a really good prepared one.

Bigdog
11-23-2006, 09:14 AM
In my book.... the only thing that touches prime rib is my teeth.. :)


Horsey sauce goes great on roast beef sammis.

Boars Head brand (http://www.boarshead.com/DigiCatessen.html) makes a really good prepared one.
Ya, but not everyone makes PR as good as you, ya farker.:wink:

tony76248
11-27-2006, 05:58 PM
I like a 50/50 mixture of sour cream and horseradish. Adjust it accordingly.

chad
11-27-2006, 07:18 PM
I like a good horseradish sauce, but I'm with the guys that like just plain ground horseradish. So hot it clears all known sinuses and 3 or 4 that science haven't discovered yet!!

I usually keep a bottle of fresh ground horseradish around to make cocktail sauce for fish and shrimp.

qman
11-27-2006, 08:33 PM
I like a good horseradish sauce, but I'm with the guys that like just plain ground horseradish. So hot it clears all known sinuses and 3 or 4 that science haven't discovered yet!!

I usually keep a bottle of fresh ground horseradish around to make cocktail sauce for fish and shrimp.

I too buy horse radish root, and grind my own, when available. The diffrence is astonding. As chad says, it will clear sinuses unknown to man.:grin:

JohnHB
12-18-2012, 11:30 PM
I am a horseradish fan. None of those horseradish cream, dips etc are the equal of a great home made horseradish. Let's get the basics.
The finer you can grate your horseradish root the hotter it will be. I use a thermomix to chop/grate. It makes it exceedingly fine. Then I add a couple of pinches of salt (to taste) and a slosh of white wine vinegar - just enough to moisten the horseradish. That is it - ready to use - hot & flavoursome. If you are a wimp add some sour cream to tone down the heat!

NewEnglandEgger
01-02-2013, 09:30 PM
Some restaurants use a practice called 'marrying' to combine condiments from multiple bottles so customers always feel they have a fresh bottle.

Doing this can result in a jar/bottle being around for a really long time if the place does not have any standards for keeping their stock somewhat fresh.

A bit disturbing to think the OP may have encountered a jar that had been married more times than Hugh Hefner!

The Drill Sargent
01-03-2013, 02:49 PM
In my book.... the only thing that touches prime rib is my teeth.. :)


Horsey sauce goes great on roast beef sammis.

Boars Head brand (http://www.boarshead.com/DigiCatessen.html) makes a really good prepared one.

Boars head is good stuff. Any respectable steak house should make their own though.

canoe
01-07-2013, 03:39 PM
For the folks who like fresh horseradish - that stuff is weed and is very easy to grow. Just place the root in some soil. Just be sure to plant it where you would not mind it taking over. It grows like crazy.

LT72884
01-07-2013, 06:59 PM
i LOVE horseradish but once i dug up a fresh horse radish root and then blended it up in the vitamix(blend tech blender) then made the mistake of opening it up and taking a deep breathe. Snot and tears came out me eyes and i lost my dinner. Instant reflex of the vomiting system. man alive. it was awesome.

anyway, what i do is add sour cream and parsley. i love it hot but to me the flavor of a cream sauce on prime rib or a steak is amazing.

IamMadMan
01-07-2013, 08:58 PM
OK so I read the mayo thread, since the product in question was essentially mayo (Kraft horseradish sauce). However I didn't see the age question covered so.......

Saturday myself and MrsPimp go to a very well regarded rest. for steak. Long story short I ordered prime rib, rare of course. When my meat got to me I asked for horseradish and they brought me the aftermentioned product. I used it for a while (on french fries) for awhile before I realized that it was warm. So I'm checking the label to see if it requires refrigeration and I see the expire date


11/06/06:icon_smil

WTF! So what do the food safety gurus say about this? Safe or Not?

How dangerous is expired mayo type products?

I would not be happy with this discovery. Some restaurants refill these from bulk containers to save money. Here Health law prohibits refilling labeled commercial containers to prevent putting another product under a different label. Refilling non-labeled or generic squeeze containers is permitted.

martyleach
01-07-2013, 10:50 PM
OK, so here is my favorite way of making horseradish sauce. I finely grind my horseradish root with a microplane. Then I use heavy whipping cream and whip it up till it is tight. Add some salt and the horseradish. Maybe a small pinch of sugar. Simply decadent.....

MS2SB
01-24-2013, 05:26 PM
For Passover dinner I make a Jewish staple called chrain. It's a preparation using fresh horseradish, white vinegar a little sugar and fresh beets. Everything goes through the shredder blade on the food processor. The beets give it a bright red color and the stuff is POWERFUL. I put on a pair of ski goggles and wrap a bandana around me nose and mouth to prevent serious discomfort ruing preparation.

popeye
01-25-2013, 09:19 AM
if you want a good bloody mary try a litle horse radih in it