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YankeeBBQ
09-06-2006, 04:56 PM
How much fat do you trim from your briskets ? This is a picture of the first place brisket at New Hollandhttp://www.ismellsmoke.com/picture_library/nhbrisket.JPG

The_Kapn
09-06-2006, 05:02 PM
That's pretty much it for us also and our briskie has been doing well.

TIM

BBQchef33
09-06-2006, 05:15 PM
wow...

i leave it mostly intact, remove all the yellow, or very hard stuff, and even out any deep pockets. try to even the fat cap, thats about it...

But that thar brisket looks naked.

The_Kapn
09-06-2006, 05:37 PM
I guess this begs the question of "Why do you trim (or not trim) the fat cap from Brisket".

We used to leave it on, now we remove it almost totally.

Seems that if you put rub on thick fat, it just melts away with the fat. That leaves bare (unspiced) meat, or meat with a layer of nasty fat to present the judges or trim off.
If the fat is trimmed, the rub flavor stays on the meat and is "useful".
We get full bark all around the brisket by removing the fat.

Some say the fat cap (if down) will "cushion" the bottom of the meat That very well may be true on cookers where the heat comes from the bottom. However, we cook on a rotisserie, so the heat is swirling all around--coming from everywhere. Works for us.

So, we find that we get a better product by trimming the fat cap off.

An unexpected side effect is that there is much less useless grease rendering off. Cooker is much easier to keep clean.

This is gonna be a matter of personal preference and will probably vary a lot depending on the cooker.
So, this is just FWIW from my perspective.

TIM

Wine & Swine
09-06-2006, 06:15 PM
Great tips, I guess it is all relative to your smoker?

bbqbull
09-06-2006, 06:49 PM
Last briskets I did were flats. They had a nice creamy white fat cap and not very thick. I just did a mustard base, rubbed them and placed them in the smoker. Came out awesome. When I do full packer briskets, I prep them same as Phil mentioned. If your worrying about the melting fat washing or melting away the rub on top. Sprinkle a bit more rub on the meat when you pull it of your pit. Ive had great luck doing that also. Just dont do it all the time. I like to tweak and expierment when doing things. My guests tell me the meat tastes just fine. Hard for me to judge my own cooking as Im my own worst nighmare. When it comes for me to judge my own Q-uin.

JohnMcD348
09-06-2006, 08:22 PM
Hard for me to judge my own cooking as Im my own worst nighmare. When it comes for me to judge my own Q-uin.

I know what you mean. My wife keeps getting pissed at me becuase she's always telling me how great my ribs are and I always keep telling her what's wrong with them.

I'm still experimenting with the best way for me to cook a brisket. haven't quite mastered my trimming skills yet.

cmcadams
09-06-2006, 08:28 PM
I've taken the fat cap off after cooking, but now I'm going to have to try taking it off before. I like my rub... It should be good stuff!

butts
09-06-2006, 08:29 PM
I tend to leave a little more fat cap than the picture illustrates. As Kapn said it depends on the cooker. I cook on a Stump's where all the heat comes from the bottom so I feel that a little more fat helps keep the bottom from drying out. Yes, fat side down for me!

I do also reseason about halfway through my cooking time.

HoDeDo
09-06-2006, 08:33 PM
I tend to leave a little more fat cap than the picture illustrates. As Kapn said it depends on the cooker. I cook on a Stump's where all the heat comes from the bottom so I feel that a little more fat helps keep the bottom from drying out. Yes, fat side down for me!

I do also reseason about halfway through my cooking time.

I'd love to see some pics of your Stump's, and learn more about how they work....

HoDeDo
09-06-2006, 08:35 PM
We trim alot of the fat off... leave about 1/8" or so... we also put the fat side down (thanks DrBBQ for that tip) and have done ok with brisket. I have tried a naked brisket and different injections, but have found a little fat makes a difference.

Kirk
09-06-2006, 08:52 PM
Wow, that shows what I know. I always do mine like the Poob said. If someone showed me that pic without any description, I'd have said that the cook didn't know what he was doing. First place pretty much rules out that idea though (nice going Steve). Just goes to show, don't knock it 'till you've tried it, even if it flies in the face of conventional wisdom. I can see the advantages of the technique as far as full coverage on the bark but I'm afraid that I'd be able to use that brisket for a skid plate on my truck after it came out of my WSM. I do trim my butts this way to maximize bark since there's not much chance of them drying out.
Any pics of the finished product?

we'll smoke u
09-06-2006, 09:22 PM
I tend to leave a little more fat cap than the picture illustrates. As Kapn said it depends on the cooker. I cook on a Stump's where all the heat comes from the bottom so I feel that a little more fat helps keep the bottom from drying out. Yes, fat side down for me!

I do also reseason about halfway through my cooking time.



I do the same I leave about a 1/8 of a fat cap and cook fat down. I have a home made vertical smoker like a stumps. seams to work good for me.

Jeff_in_KC
09-06-2006, 10:38 PM
I trim most all of the "hard" fat off. A 12 pound brisket probably weighs 10 pounds when I'm done trimming. I take off that nasty yellowish fat on the fat cap and all the thick stuff. I trim excessive fat off the top of the flat. I also never bother to season the bottom (fat cap).

bob n humble
09-07-2006, 12:25 AM
I trim mine down to about 1/8 all over, and cut the fat pockets out as well. When I'm done the flat and the point are just about seperated. I save the trimmings so when I flip it over at about half way done I can put the fat back on. There has been times when I have weighed the trimmings and found that I had reduced the wt. by about a lb.
Bob

ole'e
09-07-2006, 05:17 AM
We do about 1/4 inch get rid of the hard fat.

cmcadams
09-07-2006, 05:53 AM
I don't take all the fat off to eat brisket at home, but for comps, I remove it. When I judged the one comp I've judged, a couple of weeks ago, none of the entries my table saw had the fat trimmed, and the judges all commented on that. None were trimmed to fit the box. With some, that wasn't a problem, but some were just too big for the boxes, so they looked bad.

I'm going to try trimming down a bit more, to ensure more bark all around. We include cut up pieces of bark in the box, but not underneath; I like the look of it in the box, too, and I want the judges to see it so they'll try it instead of not knowing it's underneath.

Kirk
09-07-2006, 07:54 AM
Curt, are you saying that the brisket turn ins still had fat on them when they hit your table? I can't imagine turning in something like that. (But then again, I couldn't have imagined trimming off all the fat before cooking either before reading this thread).

River City Smokehouse
09-07-2006, 08:32 AM
I trim it all up as in the photo. I use all the fat by laying it on the rack above the brisket and coat it down good with rub. It will render down really nice and slow thus dripping down onto your brisket keeping it nice and moist. Kind of a self basting method I like. I stole this method from Stuart Carpenter who is one of David Klose's friends. It works well.

cmcadams
09-07-2006, 09:14 AM
Curt, are you saying that the brisket turn ins still had fat on them when they hit your table? I can't imagine turning in something like that. (But then again, I couldn't have imagined trimming off all the fat before cooking either before reading this thread).

That's exactly what I'm saying... They cooked the brisket with fat cap, cut it, and turned it in. Really not a lot of effort put into the appearance. Some of it had the fat in the middle (part point, part flat).

I'm still of the theory that only the internal fat and connective tissue really keeps the meat moist. I want to play around with this a bit to prove or disprove it to myself. But fat on the outside, I think, just about all just renders off. If this weren't true, having fat cap down would result in drier meat.

scottyd
09-07-2006, 05:44 PM
i Trim 2 Briskets To 1/8" And I Also Cook One Whole Packer That I Do Not Trim. At A Contest I Always Cook 3 Briskets. I Just Want The Best Of Both Worlds.

ThomEmery
09-07-2006, 08:37 PM
We do just a lil trimin and use it for to dripdown if we dont have Pork Butts over our Briskeys

Porkysbbq
09-08-2006, 08:10 AM
http://i112.photobucket.com/albums/n186/porkysbbq/PIC_0002.jpgheres a pic of my weekend brisket before the vultures got it lol
http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/%5BIMG%5Dhttp://i112.photobucket.com/albums/n186/porkysbbq/PIC_0002.jpg%5B/IMG%5D

VitaminQ
09-08-2006, 08:16 AM
I usually trim out the really heavy deposits of fat- like that thick lode of it that's usually between the point and flat on the side. I cook cap-down, and really believe in that method, especially since I cook on bullets. Making the change to cap down made a big difference for me in my brisket success. Because the cap will be facing down, and rendering off into the water pan, I normally don't even apply rub to that side.

jminion
09-08-2006, 01:01 PM
I cook fat cap down, do remove hard fat. I trim the brisket to fit the box allowing for shrinkage, this gives better apperance with smokering across the top and down the side of each slice.

Sawdustguy
09-08-2006, 01:19 PM
I agree with Jim Minion. All we do to trim the brisket is to cut off anything that looks like it doesn't belong. We do not trim the fat cap. We also cook fat cap down. During the turn-in box make up we trim the brisket to fit the box and remove the fat. We dip each piece in a secret concoction to give it a nice color and shine.

brian j
09-09-2006, 09:05 AM
i cut the flat so that i'll fit in the box but don't trim much fat from cap. then i cook fat side down and trim the fat off before serving.

homebbq
09-09-2006, 09:17 AM
I guess this begs the question of "Why do you trim (or not trim) the fat cap from Brisket".

We used to leave it on, now we remove it almost totally.


TIM

Besides the cooker, I think this also may depend on what temp, and how long you cook it. Me personally (much like Phil), I pretty much leave the fat cap intact, I might even it out a bit. And as far as trimming, I remove the hard fat, yellow fat, and trim the edges some to square it up for the box. But that's it. Also, depending on what sanctioning the contest is, I might remove the nose and cook it seperately.

Pig Headed
09-09-2006, 03:23 PM
Brian,

I've tasted your brisket. Whatever it is you're doing, keep doing it.