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bbqjoe
06-22-2006, 09:04 AM
After reading some of yesterdays posts concerning mayonaise I am completely flabbergasted.
I am not disputing what was read, but this goes against everything I ever heard or was taught.
I'm fairly certain, that if I had cold table pan of mayo sitting at room temp open on a counter when the health inspector came in, she would have something to say about it.

Fortunately, I don't serve mayo here except for slaw and potato salad, which are always kept cold.

I have too often witnessed mayo handling that has caused me to never order it in a restaurant.
I have seen pans of mayo that have been sitting unused for hours, developing that yellowish transparent layer on top, only to be stirred in and then applied to a sandwich.

Well, maybe the mayo hasn't grown any bacteria, but I'm not counting on it.

CharlieBeasley
06-22-2006, 09:25 AM
Joe Come on you are the man. What are the real facts not gut feeling (pardon the pun) We had a few links in the other thread what do the health departments say?

bbqjoe
06-22-2006, 09:36 AM
I have a call into my local health inspector.
Please stand by.......

Sledneck
06-22-2006, 09:50 AM
I recieved a bottle of squeeze mayo in my gift bag from grillin on the bay and it says right on front "no refrigeration" its been open and in my cabinet and still seems good

timzcardz
06-22-2006, 10:35 AM
For those that might have missed yesterday's discussion, here is the link that was provided to a mayonnaise fact sheet, wherein it states that it does not need to be refrigerated from a safety standpoint.

http://www.co.yakima.wa.us/health/documents/mayoo.pdf

bigabyte
06-22-2006, 10:49 AM
Well, I guess pickles don't need refrigeration, so it makes sense. Same with pickled eggs. Still creepy to think about though.

kcquer
06-22-2006, 11:12 AM
From the days before refrigeration, pickling and salting were the proper methods of food storage.

bbqjoe
06-22-2006, 11:17 AM
I just got off the phone with our health dept inspector.
I asked her about the refrigeration of mayo.
I told her of the literature that said mayo didn't need refrigeration if the eggs used were pasturized. She said she wasn't aware of that info.
I then asked her how she would react if she walked into my kitchen and saw a pan of mayo on the counter at room temp.

She said that she would first ask why this was out and not under refrigeration.
She said that if I explained the above to her, she would want to see the packaging. If the package stated that refrigeration was not required, then she would have to go with the manufacturers recommendation on the label.

Personal note: I'm keeping mine refrigerated, period.

bigabyte
06-22-2006, 11:58 AM
Does anyone else find it odd that a Health Dept. Inspector was not aware of this? I think the inspector gave a great answer considering the circumstances, but I would have guessed this would have been a water cooler topic at some point over there at the Health Dept.

timzcardz
06-22-2006, 11:59 AM
Well, with a little digging, found out that Hellmann's (Best's, west of the Rockies) agrees that mayonnaise is not a safety issue.

http://www.unilever800.com/hellmanns_faq/answer.asp?host=www.hellmanns.com&ID=5&Counter=1&When=6/22/2006

wnkt
06-22-2006, 12:09 PM
Theres probably so much chemicals in the regular retail mayo now adays that its not as big a problem.

qman
06-22-2006, 10:16 PM
Theres probably so much chemicals in the regular retail mayo now adays that its not as big a problem.
It is not so much a matter of chemicals, as it is chemistry. Truth is that Mayo is a very stable product, with enough acidity to retard bactarial growth.

BrooklynQ
06-23-2006, 12:58 AM
Well, with a little digging, found out that Hellmann's (Best's, west of the Rockies) agrees that mayonnaise is not a safety issue.

http://www.unilever800.com/hellmanns_faq/answer.asp?host=www.hellmanns.com&ID=5&Counter=1&When=6/22/2006

It's an interesting debate, because I asked the guy from Hellman's about the Mayo he gave us for Grillin' On The Bay and he said that no Hellman's or Best (Same product different name) Mayo needed to be refridgerated. But they only labeled the squeeze bottle as such. Regular jars still have the refriderate after opening waring on them. As he put it, "Marketing my boy, marketing."

Jeff_in_KC
06-23-2006, 08:14 AM
I'm with Joe on this one... I'm just keeping mine refrigerated anyway regardless of the documentation.

timzcardz
06-23-2006, 09:17 AM
It is good to keep it refrigerated from a quality standpoint, it's just not required from a safety standpoint.

Form the linked fact sheet:


Q.What happens if I leave
mayonnaise unrefrigerated
for a long period of time?

A. From a food safety standpoint, commercial mayonnaise and
mayonnaise-type dressings are perfectly stable when stored at room
temperature after opening. Quality, not safety, is the only reason
the labels on these products suggest that they be refrigerated after
opening. Refrigeration ensures that the commercial mayonnaise
keeps its fresh flavor for a longer period of time.

CarbonToe
06-28-2006, 05:43 AM
mayo didn't need refrigeration if the eggs used were pasturized.

I was thinking the same thing, but 'Helmans' needs refrigeration once opened. Doesnt all premade mayo use pasturized eggs?

Is it also something to do with the treatment of the eggs other than pasturization?

If you want to convince yourself that diet products are bad pickup a jar of Helmans Original and Helmans Light and compare the ingredients. The Light is stuffed full of chemicals!

Bigmista
06-28-2006, 11:08 AM
Interesting thread. I've been at picnics where potato salad has been left out all day and no one got sick.

bbqinNC
06-28-2006, 01:13 PM
I think this is a myth (mayonnaise causing problems) my self. The real problem is what is the mayonnaise on or in. Having said that, I still refrigerate my mayo.:biggrin:

jgh1204
06-28-2006, 09:08 PM
I dont know about mayo, but I do remember growing up and at my elementary school, the salad dressing(generic miracle whip) was not refrigerated.

Steppenwolf
11-29-2006, 05:13 PM
I believe it's not the eggs so much as the oil. The egg is essentially covered in oil, keeping air from getting to it. Oil lasts a long time at room temp.
I know I've seen yellowed mayo used, restirred, in the past in my coffee shops and fast food. I've tasted it, too. It may have been just my imagination since I knew what I was tasting but it seemed that there was a great difference in taste. Not rancid, per se, more of a different texture in the taste if you know what I mean.

CharlieBeasley
11-30-2006, 12:04 PM
From a older lady Home economics teacher is there is enough acidity that you should not have to worry about it setting out. For the long haul (overnight) she puts it in the frig. As for the health inspector they have to error on the side of caution or the whining sue everybody for their own stupidity BSers will get you! I would love to open a restaurant but the mind f--K you have to put up with is beyond my ability so far Hats of to you Joe.

FatDad
11-30-2006, 12:35 PM
I got in this discussion somtime last year and received lot's of feedback
to the negative.

I keep my mayo refrigerated but I use it cooking.

I challenge you guys to try this...
Take a couple of Johnsonville Brats and smear mayo all over one of them.
Put them in the smoker / cooker and cook as usual.
You won't believe the difference and the juicy taste of the mayo covered
brat. It will amaze you.

I have also used mayo when smoking single turkey breasts and they come
out very moist.

I have done this for years and I never got sick from it.

This is just my 2 cents..... Not intended to start a disagreement.

Steppenwolf
11-30-2006, 01:18 PM
I used to grill chicken, putting Mayo on at the end. Been a long time since I did that and had forgotten until Fatdad's post. Don't put it on early, wait till the chicken's about done. It burns easily when you grill. Good stuff.

bbqjoe
12-03-2006, 12:03 PM
I've seen folks using mayo on grilled fish fillets to keep them from sticking to the grill.
My Mom also makes a wonderful salmon by mixing tons of dill into mayonaise and smearing like a good inch of it on top of the fillet before baking. Comes out wonderful!
But once again, It seems pretty difficult to get pasturized mayo to grow anything.

thillin
12-03-2006, 12:55 PM
Works great smeared on hot corn on the cob in place of butter. Then sprinkle on some cajun seasoning.

jpw23
12-03-2006, 05:36 PM
Works great smeared on hot corn on the cob in place of butter. Then sprinkle on some cajun seasoning.

This must be a regional thing:shock:

bbqjoe
12-03-2006, 07:39 PM
Trying to put this back on track...............
Mayo shouldn't present any bacterial problems or spoiling while being used for cooking.
Recipes and the likes really should be in Q-talk. (Guilty as well)

thillin
12-04-2006, 10:49 AM
Sorry, I left out the fact I was turned onto the corn thing by street vendors in Mexico. Mayo was on the cart next to the seasonings. Don't remember it being kept cool. Never got sick, I might just been lucky then(20 yrs ago).

FatDaddy
12-06-2006, 03:10 AM
i dont think anything in the border towns in mexico are refrigerated. We use miracle whip at the house. i like it better than real mayonaise. Can it be left out as well? i dont recall ever looking to see if it has a refrigerate after opening label on it. We keep it in the fridge but just curious.

Kevin
12-06-2006, 03:20 AM
We use miracle whip at the house. i like it better than real mayonaise. Can it be left out as well? i dont recall ever looking to see if it has a refrigerate after opening label on it. We keep it in the fridge but just curious.

Not on the label but, it does say "Refrigerate after opening." On the lid.

chad
12-06-2006, 08:35 AM
the "refrigerate after opening" is to preserve the appearance and flavor...Miracle Whip is like "processed cheese food product" - you could smear it on a bridge railing and it'll still be edible three days later.

Steppenwolf
12-06-2006, 09:03 AM
the "refrigerate after opening" is to preserve the appearance and flavor...Miracle Whip is like "processed cheese food product" - you could smear it on a bridge railing and it'll still be edible three days later.
That's a pretty loose use of the term "edible" :icon_bigsmil

tony76248
12-13-2006, 02:14 AM
the "refrigerate after opening" is to preserve the appearance and flavor...Miracle Whip is like "processed cheese food product" - you could smear it on a bridge railing and it'll still be edible three days later.

I may have to try that to ensure that you are right.