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View Full Version : comp vs backyard bbq flavor profiles........


Blownmope
02-23-2014, 09:07 PM
Being new to this and having backyard bbq mindset, is there a diff between backyard bbq and comp bbq?

Thanks!

Pappy Q
02-24-2014, 05:48 AM
Yes. Backyard you cook to what you like. Comp you try to cook to what 6 random strangers will like. Very different concepts. In comps, the judges will mostly take one bite of the product, so that one bite better be good. Also in comps, the tenderness/texture factor is much more important than backyard.

bruno994
02-24-2014, 09:17 AM
I think another key point is for Comp Q, they are taking one bite, you better amp it up and make it memorable while not offending anyone. Backyard Q, your cooking for what you like but also have the ability to eat a plate full where as Comp Q would probably give you a belly ache after a full plate.

PekingPorker
02-24-2014, 09:30 AM
Yeah, it's all about amazing flavor in one or two bites. That amazing flavor is usually so intense that you wouldn't want to eat more than two or three ribs because they become overwhelming.

TooSaucedToPork
02-24-2014, 11:02 AM
Portion size depends on the sanctioning organization. Kcbs the judge gets 1 rib. Mbn the blind judge usually gets a 2 bone cut and each of the 3 the onsite judges will get a full rack.

You take this into account for your flavor profile.

Lake Dogs
02-24-2014, 12:49 PM
Being new to this and having backyard bbq mindset, is there a diff between backyard bbq and comp bbq?

Thanks!

What all the guys above said is true. The one bite thing is more about KCBS than others...

In most sanctioned competitions, as long as the flavor is good and balanced (not too hot, not too salty, not too sweet, not too bland either, not too smokey, etc.), the one that hits the sanctioning bodies definition of perfect tenderness scores best. Partly the reasoning on this is that what really excites one person on flavor (which is definitely subjective) doesn't excite someone else. However, tenderness is largely defined, so you're being measured to a standard. Best hit of that standard usually wins.

Also, CBJ's are stone cold sober when judging; very different that having the boys over for some beer and some Q.


Because the MBN (MiM) judges come and will eat quite a bit more, I now use these recipes at home, back-yard if you will...

Podge
02-24-2014, 02:45 PM
The difference between Backyard vs. pro's is lighter fluid :)..

Judges in the backyard are just as human as the judges in the Pro. They just happen to be a bit more forgiving in Backyard for the most part.

msavard
02-24-2014, 03:55 PM
Portion size depends on the sanctioning organization. Kcbs the judge gets 1 rib. Mbn the blind judge usually gets a 2 bone cut and each of the 3 the onsite judges will get a full rack.

You take this into account for your flavor profile.

:thumb: exactly.

Onsite in MBN, many judges will eat damn near that whole slab, too. For our boxes we submit cadillac cut 2 bone sections (meat from 3 rib bones).

CBQ
02-24-2014, 05:41 PM
Being new to this and having backyard bbq mindset, is there a diff between backyard bbq and comp bbq?

Thanks!

Comp BBQ also imposes conditions on you that make things more challenging. For example in KCBS you have to cook 4 meats, and turn them in 30 minutes apart in a 10 minute window. Late by one second, and you are disqualified.

Timing becomes very important, and cooking everything together so it's all ready on time is more challenging then being in the backyard with people knocking back a few cold ones for food that's served whenever it's ready.

Cooking everything together has other challenges. Do you cook everything at the same temp? Manage multiple cookers at once? Can you fit everything you need on the cooker? Can you recover if something doesn't go as planned without impacting the other meats?

While you want to impress with "one bite bbq" in KCBS, departing from traditional bbq flavors may alienate some judges. Leave the habanero raspberry sweet 'n sour rib sauce at home. The big secret in comp bbq is that there is no "secret ingredient." Take a few classes from good teams, and you will be surprised how alike they are.

Want to experiment without dropping coin on a class? Most of the sauces and rubs that Big Poppa's Smokers or the Kansas City Barbecue Store sell are used by comp teams. If you haven't tried Blue's Hog sauce yet, you should.

Blownmope
02-24-2014, 07:44 PM
Wow! Thank you so much for all the answers!!!!!!! The way I understand it with kcbs is they want to take one bite and not pull the meat away from the bone, rather leave a bite mark? and this has a direct correlation with tenderness??

Burnt at Both Endz
02-24-2014, 07:53 PM
Wow! Thank you so much for all the answers!!!!!!! The way I understand it with kcbs is they want to take one bite and not pull the meat away from the bone, rather leave a bite mark? and this has a direct correlation with tenderness??

If you are a KCBS member, you can go to the KCBS site and look under "resources". There is a link to the 2014 CBJ instructions MP3 that is played at all judges meetings. It will go over the criteria for tenderness.

CBQ
02-24-2014, 09:49 PM
If you are a KCBS member, you can go to the KCBS site and look under "resources".


And if you aren't - that is true for ribs. You should be able to take a clean bite, with the meat (where you bit) coming off the bone, but leaving the rest of the rib intact. What they advertise on TV ("Fall off the bone!") is not what they want. Other sanctioning bodies may be different though.

Chicken texture is mostly about the skin. Can you bite through it without it being tough or pulling the rest of the skin off with it?

Bristet has a "pull test" - can you pull a slice apart and have it resist slightly and then pull apart? That's properly cooked. Falling apart or can't pull it apart is over/under.

Pork shouldn't be mushy or tough.

All meats should be moist and tender, in addition to the above.