PDA

View Full Version : How do you build a great comp team?


TroyA65
02-07-2014, 09:35 AM
I'm thinking of doing a local comp this summer and I'm struggling with "My Team". I was tempted to just fly solo for my first event so that I can get a feel for it going forward, but everything I've read says that is probably a bad idea. BTW I have no plans of jumping on the "circuit" anytime soon, I have younger kids and too many other things going on to take that leap. I just think doing a local comp or two would be fun.

That being said, if it was just about the fun I'd have people over for another party. I want to see how my stuff stands up against other cooks in a comp. I'm not expecting to walk away as Grand Champion but I would like to at least get one call.

Now that you have some idea on my perspective, how have you guys put together your teams? How many on a team 2, 3, 4? Is one person doing all the cooking and everyone else does boxes, clean up, etc? Do you have one person do chicken, one do ribs, etc...

I have 2 or 3 friends that also live in my neighborhood that I'm considering asking (actually one has been try to convince me to do it) they are all good cooks some good at BBQ (unfortunately we all like beverages, which is a concern of mine for a comp environment).

I'm sure I'll have a lot more questions as this progresses but I am looking forward to all of your insights. Thanks guys!

MAP
02-07-2014, 09:56 AM
Just me and my wife. I do all the prep, cooking and puting the meat in the boxes. She builds the boxes, keeps things clean and her and my 9 year old son run the boxes. She also keeps me out of the booze on Friday. (I think she has the harder job)

cpw
02-07-2014, 10:00 AM
We have anywhere from 2-5 team members, depending on availability. Primarily our team is me and one other guy, we're in charge of the "contest." Everyone else is either there to help setup/cleanup or to hang out and drink beer. If we vend at a contest, then the other guys deal with the vending side of things while me and the other guy work on the contest.

Number 1 thing is make sure you like who you compete with, you'll be spending at least 24 hours straight with them.

Podge
02-07-2014, 10:11 AM
You can do it by yourself, don't let anyone tell you that you can't. I've done several by myself. Got my first G.C. by myself. A lot, and I'd almost say most, successful BBQ "Teams" in KCBS are husband/wife.

Dan - 3eyzbbq
02-07-2014, 10:12 AM
If you want to see how your stuff stacks up you don't want another cook. Find somebody that can watch your stuff over night and allow you to get some rest. You'll also need a box runner and cleanup help (you'll be tired, trust me).

Dan - 3eyzbbq
02-07-2014, 10:14 AM
A lot, and I'd almost say most, successful BBQ "Teams" in KCBS are husband/wife.

And if not, at least best friends.

mobow
02-07-2014, 10:25 AM
I married her. Keith

PekingPorker
02-07-2014, 10:31 AM
I started competing last year, and the core team is me, my wife, and one of my friends who really just wanted to learn to cook bbq. I do most of the cooking and prep, but my buddy has practiced and competed with me enough that he's comfortable prepping meats now. This year, he wants to try to cook one category. My wife does our boxes and presentation. I also have a young child so I can't take the full bbq schedule plunge, but I plan on it in years to come as my son gets older.

So I think the main factor is having someone like minded that wants to learn to cook, or enjoys cooking. I've incurred 99% of the cost myself so far, but I think we will have another member joining us this year, and may start to split some cost.

BigBellyBBQ
02-07-2014, 10:50 AM
ggoood looking , great tasting food with time management

Rub'n Wood BBQ
02-07-2014, 11:17 AM
We started with 4 people - one per meat. Couple of friends and a father in law. We did one per year like that for about 3 years. If you are looking to keep costs low and have a good time, this is an option. When we kicked it up and went to 8-10 per year, it became two people per comp. Depends on the chemistry of the team. Ours performs better with the two person team - but costs go up and clean up sucks just a little more.

If you plan to have a party and entertain, I would at least find some friends to help out on Friday night and to clean up.

NRA4Life
02-07-2014, 11:44 AM
For the last 3 seasons I've competed as a 1-man team. It was my wife and me until our daughter was born, and when she gets a little older we'll make it a family team.

atcNick
02-07-2014, 01:02 PM
The 3 comps I've done have all been solo. But they were ibca not kcbs (20 minute turn in windows, seperated by an hour or more). I think its easier for me because I want it all done my way. I just made sure to do a practice run at home, have everything outside that I think I'll need, write down anything you have to go inside for and add it to your checklist. And when you do the practice run, stick to what a normal turn in schedule would be for a comp. Also, do as much of the prep work at home that is allowed, ie: trimming, mixing up injections, sauces, etc. so that you have less work at the comp.

Scottie
02-07-2014, 01:59 PM
And if not, at least best friends.

Oh, you are actually friends with Big Ugly? I thought he was like the guest that wouldn't leave...:shock:

Only kiddin Chorus. I don't want you beating mY ass in Delaware!!:-P

Rich Parker
02-07-2014, 02:07 PM
1 man team with an occasional visiting helper is the best way to go.

SkinEz
02-07-2014, 02:07 PM
I did my first competition solo. I did it solo for the fact I didnt want to subject anyone to something I did not understand. You can do it by yourself, but you have to make sure you prep everything before you get there. Make all your sauces, rubs, injections, meat trimming before you leave the house. The worst part running solo is running the box, and having to run back to start on your next box prep. I found out I would be happy with one more person. Some teams have 4, 5, 6, people. I think thats too much. Just my $0.02.

Kave Dweller
02-07-2014, 02:27 PM
I'm basically with Dan, one man show, with a best friend that hangs out and watches the pits at night (in theory as long as he doesn't pass out). We've had a couple guys who are just getting interested helping us out as of late, which has worked out better than I could have imagined. This year the plan is to have one of the two of them with us at every comp now that we know how handy the extra set of hands can be.

Scottie
02-07-2014, 02:38 PM
Cool, I can keep you out past 3:00 am then?

TooSaucedToPork
02-07-2014, 08:39 PM
I'm thinking of doing a local comp this summer and I'm struggling with "My Team". I was tempted to just fly solo for my first event so that I can get a feel for it going forward, but everything I've read says that is probably a bad idea. BTW I have no plans of jumping on the "circuit" anytime soon, I have younger kids and too many other things going on to take that leap. I just think doing a local comp or two would be fun.

That being said, if it was just about the fun I'd have people over for another party. I want to see how my stuff stands up against other cooks in a comp. I'm not expecting to walk away as Grand Champion but I would like to at least get one call.

Your entry could be DAL (Dead A$$ Last) NOT because it is bad, but because in comp BBQ you cook for the judges, not for yourself. You must remember in KCBS you are not cooking against the other cooks food. You are cooking against the KCBS definition of good barbeque. Your entry is not being compared against the other entries at the competition, it is being compared to the three definitions of Appearance, Taste and Tenderness. MBN and a few sanctioning bodies like it instruct judges to compare entries against each other.

Now that you have some idea on my perspective, how have you guys put together your teams?

We are a big BBQ Family.

How many on a team 2, 3, 4?

We have 11 regular members

Is one person doing all the cooking and everyone else does boxes, clean up, etc?

We have Category leads, and sous chefs that back up those category leads. We have box builders and runners. We have bartenders. We have people that just like to eat.

Do you have one person do chicken, one do ribs, etc...

1 category lead. 1 sous chef. per big 4 meats.
ancillary cooks for extra contests
peoples choice cooks for peoples choice contests

I have 2 or 3 friends that also live in my neighborhood that I'm considering asking (actually one has been try to convince me to do it) they are all good cooks some good at BBQ (unfortunately we all like beverages, which is a concern of mine for a comp environment).

I'm sure I'll have a lot more questions as this progresses but I am looking forward to all of your insights. Thanks guys!

Our motto is cook as a family, win as a family. We all get along and we all pay into the contest equally. If you win a category you are paid back what you paid in, you get your trophy (as long as you bring it back to the next comp) then the rest goes into the team fund for maintanance, entry fees, better gear etc. It works for us.

Neil

jketron
02-07-2014, 08:43 PM
Its just my wife and I and that's perfect for me. If aren't having fun don't do it.

ShencoSmoke
02-07-2014, 08:50 PM
We started with 4 but now it's basically 2. I moved from NC to Va so my teamates are different depending where I am competing. Our finishes are better when it's just 2 of us. Yes, Friday nights are fun with 4 or 5, but it usually ends up biting you on Saturday morning.

indianagriller
02-07-2014, 11:23 PM
We are a 2 person team for quite a few comps and a 3 person team when school is out and the fiancÚ can come, her job is to build boxes, listen to metal music loudly, tell us our food sucks, and run boxes. the rest of the time it is Wampus and me cooking. We generally split the meats up I will prep of Chicken and Pork, he preps brisket and ribs. We both are up to fire the pit and get the meat on then we take turns stoking the fire so we can catch a couple hours sleep. By the end of this season (we cooked 18 ) everything was on auto pilot and we knew what each other was doing at any given time. We also don't party when we go to a comp so that helps us stay in the game so to speak.

Stark-O-Rama
02-07-2014, 11:31 PM
We have a big crew (10+ with People's Choice). For me - I love people, BBQ, and the experience of community. Last year was an amazing experience for us. We had such a great time meeting, feeding, and talking with competitors & the general public.

As far as who/what you need on your team - pick people that have the same goals as you. Make sure you set expectations early. And also make sure you share the budget with everyone.

Big Ugly's BBQ
02-08-2014, 07:34 AM
Oh, you are actually friends with Big Ugly? I thought he was like the guest that wouldn't leave...:shock:

Only kiddin Chorus. I don't want you beating mY ass in Delaware!!:-P

Oh, I'll be there..........don't ya worry about that at all.....:biggrin1::biggrin1:

No ass kickin required, even if you cant spell......lol!!!!!

Hawg Father of Seoul
02-08-2014, 07:41 AM
3 person team when school is out and the fiancÚ can come, her job is to build boxes, listen to metal music loudly, tell us our food sucks, and run boxes.

Maybe you should date someone who is already out of highschool. You know, for the team. ;)

Red Valley BBQ
02-08-2014, 08:36 AM
We started as a 4 or 5 person team, but because of family obligations for some of our team members we've basically become a husband and wife team and it's been for the better. I find I can focus more when I don't have to micromanage the actions of others. The wife handles her duties expertly and I can focus on the cooking.

Big Mike
02-08-2014, 09:17 AM
I am a one person team. However, I do normally find someone to run my boxes for me. I could do it, but I prefer not to if I don't have to. If you do it by yourself and do run your own boxes, I suggest trying to set up as close to the turn in location as possible.

One of the things you need to consider in determining the size of your team is how much control you want over the entire process. If you are someone who wants full control of everything (at least when it comes to the meat) then a multi-person team may not be for you. At most a 2 person team where the other member would help watch the pit through the evening, build and run boxes and help keep things organized would probably be best.

If you are willing to relinquish control/responsibility of certain meats to other members then a 3 or 4 person team may work for you. Personally I would think anything over 4 people would be too much. One advantage to a multi-person team is that the cost can be split among everyone which makes it easier because comps are not cheap.

abangs
02-08-2014, 09:23 AM
Have not seen this recommendation, but I recommend to guys that are just dipping their toes in: Go to a local contest as a spectator, talk to a few teams and maybe find one that will not mind you 'hanging' around to see how they do things. Maybe post on here and find out when a Brethren team is cooking close to you. We allow guys to hang around all the time to get a feel for the flow of a contest. Then you can piece together what you think you'll need in resources for your first event and adjust from there. We have a couple of base rules for folks hanging around though: 1) BYOB 2) bring your own chair 3) be conscious of us...if we're scrambling...then it is probably not a good time to interrupt with a question.

Otherwise, man just have fun with it. That is by in large the most important rule IMO. Have a good time and if you can involve your family...even better!

For what it is worth: we have 3 team mates. We all practice at home individually, share pictures and results of 'test' cooks with each other (w/ iphones now it is easy to do so), and our personalities compliment each other. Any one of us can cook an event solo, so that makes cooking a contest together easy as any of us can do anything equally well....with families and work, there are usually holes to be plugged and this make it easy.

Wampus
02-08-2014, 08:13 PM
We are a 2 person team for quite a few comps and a 3 person team when school is out and the fiancÚ can come, her job is to build boxes, listen to metal music loudly, tell us our food sucks, and run boxes. the rest of the time it is Wampus and me cooking. We generally split the meats up I will prep of Chicken and Pork, he preps brisket and ribs. We both are up to fire the pit and get the meat on then we take turns stoking the fire so we can catch a couple hours sleep. By the end of this season (we cooked 18 ) everything was on auto pilot and we knew what each other was doing at any given time. We also don't party when we go to a comp so that helps us stay in the game so to speak.

Yeah, I personally don't see anything wrong with an equal partnership on a 2 man team at all, as long as you're in sync. This is probably a challenge for a lot of people (2 cooks in the kitchen and all), but for us, we're on the same page. We discuss everything ahead of time, make a plan and stick to it to the letter.

What's nice about having 2 of us is that we keep each other "honest". We don't argue, but we do have some subtle disagreements on minor details, but we always work it out and come to an agreement in the end. The BIGGEST thing to consider if you're cooking with a partner is not to let egos get in the way. We're both in equally financially and we share the work completely. It's definitely nice to take shifts sleeping and all, but in the end, we're EXACTLY on the same page. Just a couple of comps into last season, we don't even have to talk much through the whole routine. We've got it down. Even in the rare instances one of us can't make it to a comp, it's no big deal. The other guy just follows the same plan. We both had to do solo cooks here and there and our scores were consistent even running solo because we stick to the plan without fail.


Personally, I'd rather not do it alone. It's nice to have a teammate you can completely trust in the whole thing to lean on.
I mean I've cooked solo, but having someone to split the cost is nice too. It's not a cheap hobby.

indianagriller
02-08-2014, 08:58 PM
Maybe you should date someone who is already out of highschool. You know, for the team. ;)

Yea, yea LOL... that did kinda sound bad, she works for the school system so summers are free...

Kave Dweller
02-08-2014, 09:10 PM
Cool, I can keep you out past 3:00 am then?

Doesn't take a whole lot of effort to keep me up and drinking. . . Libertyville was bad, I left your pit to find my "night watchman" had decided to partake in a handle of jager with the neighbors. He was Toast and I wasn't too far behind.

Scottie
02-08-2014, 09:23 PM
He should have just come over with us then...

Kave Dweller
02-08-2014, 09:45 PM
Yeah if we were hot and fast guys it wouldn't have been a big deal, but he had "things" he was suppose to do.

TroyA65
02-08-2014, 09:57 PM
Thanks guys! I really appreciate the honest feedback and insights. This will be very helpful! I'll keep you posted as I get closer to pulling the trigger on my first comp. Hopefully I'll see some of you there.

Kave Dweller
02-08-2014, 10:02 PM
Kenosha is a great comp, will give you till the end of August to get it together. Ton of great comps around wisconsin.

Scottie
02-08-2014, 10:44 PM
I got the entry for Kenosha at the banquet. Might just pull in at 10:00 pm on Friday....

Indybbq
02-08-2014, 10:57 PM
Here's something I've somewhat struggled with, maybe you guys can give some advice...

The friends that like BBQ, are willing to come to a competition and eat leftovers and drink, and occationally help clean but don't want to help pay. As you all know, competiting isn't cheap. How do you handle friends that like to come to comps and enjoy the "fringe benefits" but don't want to pay for anything?

Kave Dweller
02-08-2014, 11:09 PM
I got the entry for Kenosha at the banquet. Might just pull in at 10:00 pm on Friday....

Its a fun one.

Atlasman
02-09-2014, 05:49 AM
I was the one interested in BBQ to start as I just love to cook. My wife wanted to hang out and have some fun so we entered a contest. We got 2 calls and she was hooked as well.

Now we have a 26 foot camper and a few cookers and more toys then we should. At first she was not involved in the cooking as she was afraid she wouldn't do well, I wanted us to be a TEAM so I told her she was responsible for chicken from now on. I helped her nail the recipe but then left her alone, I just keep the smokers ready for her and she runs the yardbird show. Her first time solo she took 1st out of 80+ teams and had 5 or 6 calls including another 1st that year.

We rock as a team because we trust each other and we have a blast prepping and cooking. We know what needs to be done so we just do it and have fun.

Here's the BAD part...........try convincing her that anything outside the top 5 is still OK :shock: early success has a way of spoiling some cooks and I keep reminding her how hard it really is to get those top calls. On the other hand though I love that she wants to win so bad.........another way we are a perfect match. We show up to win........everything else is a bonus.

Find someone you REALLY enjoy cooking with and my advice would be agree on your recipes BEFORE the contest. Split the cooking however you want but just do your thing and see what scores you get. Adjust when patterns develop, they don't lie.

indianagriller
02-09-2014, 06:30 AM
Here's something I've somewhat struggled with, maybe you guys can give some advice...

The friends that like BBQ, are willing to come to a competition and eat leftovers and drink, and occationally help clean but don't want to help pay. As you all know, competiting isn't cheap. How do you handle friends that like to come to comps and enjoy the "fringe benefits" but don't want to pay for anything?

If they are at a comp and you get a call drag them up there with you... Greatest rush in BBQ comps is hearing your name... That should set the hook I know it did with me.

TroyA65
02-09-2014, 10:02 AM
Wow! Good for her...and for you!

I was the one interested in BBQ to start as I just love to cook. My wife wanted to hang out and have some fun so we entered a contest. We got 2 calls and she was hooked as well.

Now we have a 26 foot camper and a few cookers and more toys then we should. At first she was not involved in the cooking as she was afraid she wouldn't do well, I wanted us to be a TEAM so I told her she was responsible for chicken from now on. I helped her nail the recipe but then left her alone, I just keep the smokers ready for her and she runs the yardbird show. Her first time solo she took 1st out of 80+ teams and had 5 or 6 calls including another 1st that year.

We rock as a team because we trust each other and we have a blast prepping and cooking. We know what needs to be done so we just do it and have fun.

Here's the BAD part...........try convincing her that anything outside the top 5 is still OK :shock: early success has a way of spoiling some cooks and I keep reminding her how hard it really is to get those top calls. On the other hand though I love that she wants to win so bad.........another way we are a perfect match. We show up to win........everything else is a bonus.

Find someone you REALLY enjoy cooking with and my advice would be agree on your recipes BEFORE the contest. Split the cooking however you want but just do your thing and see what scores you get. Adjust when patterns develop, they don't lie.

Scottie
02-09-2014, 10:19 AM
Its a fun one.



I was at the first one. Conflicts the last 2 years

MikeJ65
02-09-2014, 10:26 AM
Here's something I've somewhat struggled with, maybe you guys can give some advice...

The friends that like BBQ, are willing to come to a competition and eat leftovers and drink, and occationally help clean but don't want to help pay. As you all know, competiting isn't cheap. How do you handle friends that like to come to comps and enjoy the "fringe benefits" but don't want to pay for anything?

If they are there after turn-ins, I give them a couple of burnt ends and put them to work packing up the trailer. If I invite them on Friday, I just tell them that they can't walk in with alcohol so they need to get anything they want to drink to me ahead of time so that it comes in with the trailer.

If we are doing People's Choice, anyone visiting is a teammate/helper. Most of my friends are foodies or chefs, so I get some pretty good help.

cheapbeer
02-09-2014, 12:04 PM
Curiosity got the best of me so I entered a few comps last year. I am fortunate to have had a good mentor who gave me a great headstart but I spent a lot of time on the net looking at pics of turn-in boxes and started gearing my winter cooks towards kcbs turn-ins. I bought a video class and picked up a few things from it and spent a lot of time here going through old threads. Bought a copy of George Hensler's book "Starting The Fire" which covers a lot of questions for a start-up team and read it a few times. I took the CBJ class to get that perspective. I started timing my cooks, keeping notes, and experimenting with new recipes. Memorial Day weekend I packed up what I thought I needed and went to a campground. Did a full kcbs cook, real time, and turned in my garnished boxes to my judges (existing team) and after I was finished we went through their notes. This was an invaluable experience, I did it alone, and the judges watched, made notes, and gave me no input until afterward. Doing this affirms that you can meet the demands of a comp before you actually are in one and gets a few of the mistakes out of the way. When my first comp arrived my lady made the garnish boxes and I did the cooking. A few friends were on hand an hour before turn-ins to lend a hand as needed and we got through the first one. Got a few top ten calls and top ten overall. Second comp had an amateur comp run with it and same friends did that portion of the turn-ins. Got a few top five calls and top ten overall. Hearing your name called in your first few events will get you hooked and wanting to take it up a notch. Learn as much as possible before hand, make sure you can get all your meats turned in on time, take pictures of your boxes for later review as your mistakes stand out, and learn from your mistakes. I like the challenge of taking responsibility for the cooking and have so far enjoyed a great support group who I try to repay with good food and a team nite out at a supper club after season is over. You will meet many great people on your journey who are happy to help a new team find their way. Enjoy the experience. I apologize for the long winded reply.

speedrcer1
02-09-2014, 03:40 PM
A great deal depends on your personality. You know how well you play with others and how you deal with conflict. I chose the team route as I know when to be forceful and when to let someone else take the lead.
If you go the team route, have a playbook, with times and recipes. That way everyone knows what to do. Develop them together with practice.
Also, discuss the financial aspect. Be it all equal contribution, share expenses and rewards, or one leader assumes all.

Just remember to have fun.

Wampus
02-09-2014, 03:55 PM
Here's something I've somewhat struggled with, maybe you guys can give some advice...

The friends that like BBQ, are willing to come to a competition and eat leftovers and drink, and occationally help clean but don't want to help pay. As you all know, competiting isn't cheap. How do you handle friends that like to come to comps and enjoy the "fringe benefits" but don't want to pay for anything?

If they're your friends, then you should be able to have an honest conversation with them and tell them what's on your mind.
Remind them that the leftovers they're enjoying and the camp they get to hang out in all cost YOU money.

Personally, I wouldn't want the distraction.
We compete to win and take it seriously.
Having people there that are only interested in partying and nibbling and not at LEAST share the work will only distract you.

IMO.

dhuffjr
02-09-2014, 04:12 PM
My wife and I cook together. Okay I cook and she tells me how bad I've messed things up. She does most of the dishwashing and box building. I tend to help her with the boxes if I'm not out meandering around talking. It is something we started doing together and enjoy.

guntera
02-09-2014, 07:53 PM
For the last 3 seasons I've competed as a 1-man team. It was my wife and me until our daughter was born, and when she gets a little older we'll make it a family team.

Couldn't have said it better myself...Those little daughters can keep a dad/pitmaster on his toes!

TooSaucedToPork
02-09-2014, 08:47 PM
Here's something I've somewhat struggled with, maybe you guys can give some advice...

The friends that like BBQ, are willing to come to a competition and eat leftovers and drink, and occationally help clean but don't want to help pay. As you all know, competiting isn't cheap. How do you handle friends that like to come to comps and enjoy the "fringe benefits" but don't want to pay for anything?

If they are in your camp, and you invited them there as your guests, its on you...they owe nothing.

If they are "on the team" then they need to pony up when asked. If they have been told before the contest that the team shares in costs equally, and they still don't pony up...then they are crappy friends.

A lot of people don't understand the costs behind this hobby. You need to explain to them before the contest how much it costs to do this contest, and what is expected of them.

Red Valley BBQ
02-09-2014, 09:30 PM
Here's something I've somewhat struggled with, maybe you guys can give some advice...

The friends that like BBQ, are willing to come to a competition and eat leftovers and drink, and occationally help clean but don't want to help pay. As you all know, competiting isn't cheap. How do you handle friends that like to come to comps and enjoy the "fringe benefits" but don't want to pay for anything?

Unless I specifically give out samples to try at a comp, all of my leftover bbq is bagged up and I sell it when I get home. It helps to recoup some of our expenses. Tell them if they want to eat, they are going to pay for it. I usually sell my ribs for $1 a bone, two chicken thighs or a small bag of pulled pork for $2 and brisket goes for $3 a bag. I have no problem selling it off at home.

ClayHill
02-09-2014, 09:47 PM
just my 2cents...It can be done with one person, My first comp, I was alone and it was brutal...but I got the job done, well almost. I will say, it gets a bit boring when your sitting under a canopy in cold driving rain/snow @ 5 am feeding a stick burner.

Big Ugly's BBQ
02-10-2014, 06:03 AM
just my 2cents...It can be done with one person, My first comp, I was alone and it was brutal...but I got the job done, well almost. I will say, it gets a bit boring when your sitting under a canopy in cold driving rain/snow @ 5 am feeding a stick burner.

Hey I was at that one also, wasnt any more fun watching you feed that stickburner.......:loco:

Indybbq
02-10-2014, 08:55 AM
Thanks for the all the input. I guess I'm somewhat of a pushover and that's on me.

rtboswell
02-10-2014, 07:11 PM
My wife and I are the main team members with the occasional friend or family member pitching in to help with random aspects.

At a normal comp I arrive and setup by myself on Friday night and my wife and son (he's 20 months old) will come later on in the night or early Saturday depending on the location. I prepare and cook all the meat pretty much by myself while the family gets some sleep. Saturday morning my wife is indispensable- she is well rested and ensures that the best meat gets in the box with the best presentation possible. Of course she helps with clean up and whoever else shows up is usually integral in watching our son and cleaning as well.

The first few comps were rough but now that we have a well thought process and schedule for a competition and the week leading up to it, things are very smooth. And I never get bored before they arrive since I've gotten to know a lot of KCBS that cook Georgia.

Rick Hamilton
02-11-2014, 06:27 AM
Normally just me. If you keep it simple it works out fine. When my wife and son can join they do. It is definitely more fun when they are there and simplifies things a bit from a turn in and cleanup perspective.

I think I need to update my signature.

MAP
02-11-2014, 06:44 AM
Normally just me. If you keep it simple it works out fine. When my wife and son can join they do. It is definitely more fun when they are there and simplifies things a bit from a turn in and cleanup perspective.

I think I need to update my signature.

I see you sold it!!! What you cooking on this year?

Smokesignalsfromtx
02-11-2014, 07:55 AM
hey i was at that one also, wasnt any more fun watching you feed that stickburner.......:loco:

^^^^^^^^^thats funny right there!!^^^^^^^^^

PekingPorker
02-11-2014, 10:14 AM
My wife and I are the main team members with the occasional friend or family member pitching in to help with random aspects.

At a normal comp I arrive and setup by myself on Friday night and my wife and son (he's 20 months old) will come later on in the night or early Saturday depending on the location.

Man, your situation sounds almost exactly like mine (my son is 19 months). Hope to meet you out there this season. We are signed up for Cornelia and Sam's right now, not sure if we'll make many more (baby #2 is on the way).

rtboswell
02-11-2014, 11:11 AM
Man, your situation sounds almost exactly like mine (my son is 19 months). Hope to meet you out there this season. We are signed up for Cornelia and Sam's right now, not sure if we'll make many more (baby #2 is on the way).

We will be in Cornelia and at Sam's Marietta- as long we cook fairly close we have usually have friends and family to watch the little guy during turn-in times.

Rick Hamilton
02-11-2014, 03:11 PM
I see you sold it!!! What you cooking on this year?


Starting off in Bainbridge, GA contest with my FEC. Will probably bring a WSM as backup. Will see how it goes and make a decision on final path. Leaning towards Onyx Ovens or Southern Q. Really just want to make sure my old brain can get rest at night.

chickenchoker
02-12-2014, 08:58 AM
We are a 3 man team and the wives but its mostly 2 of us that seem really committed and do the work. The 3rd is the runner, dish washer and has a young child to contend with. I think 2 or 3 is the magic number