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Rusty Kettle
01-31-2014, 11:52 AM
Ok so I need some serious help with how to teach my wife to cook barbecue she wants to be on a team with me and it is my first year I will be competing. I figured since she can cook great food in the kitchen it would be easy to teach her to cook bbq on a weber kettle. Her first attempt was terrible flavor wise it was nasty. I don't want to hurt her feelings because she is my wife but good god I literally threw up and had to swallow it back down. It was salty to the extreme. It was so strong and the flavors clashed so badly. Her idea of a dry rub was salt pepper and garlic. Then she matched it with a home made bbq sauce that was made with dr pepper. The sauce was fine by itself but it was horrible on chicken. It did nothing to compliment the meat it just was over the top gross. I am shocked because her cooking in a kitchen is spectacular I mean the best food I have ever had. She wants to cook brisket and ribs and I am afraid she is not going to do well at all. We have plans as long as I can get off of work to do a comp in April yep in April. I want to have her as a team mate but she is not even remotely ready at all. She rarely practices and asks the same questions over and over again that she should know the answers to by now. If she wasn't my wife I would just kick her off the team for never practicing and not listening at all to me when she wants me to teach her what I know it may not be comp knowledge but seriously when something tastes bad it is bad. Any ideas how to fix this without hurting her feelings?

wrenfro12
01-31-2014, 11:59 AM
Rule 1) Don't tell her about his site!!!!!!!!!!! If she reads this you will never be heard from again.

Rule 2) read rule 1!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Tiki Wolf
01-31-2014, 12:18 PM
My wife is brutally honest with me about my BBQ, and I trust her judgment. You're going to need that type of honesty if you want to do well. I'd say develop the recipes and methods you want and teach her those.

Otherwise, teach her how to build the boxes.

Rusty Kettle
01-31-2014, 12:32 PM
Probably not but it's frustrating to have someone want to learn something but she doesn't really put any effort into it at all.

Iamarealbigdog
01-31-2014, 12:40 PM
Best advise ever.... register her for a CBJ and then go to judge a few events with her. Take a year to learn flavour profiles and during that year you can decide on what type of spices and sauces you like and what you think the other judges like ( or are scoring well)

Remember good BBQ is not necessarily Competition BBQ, often they are two very different products

ITBFQ
01-31-2014, 01:24 PM
Best advise ever.... register her for a CBJ and then go to judge a few events with her. Take a year to learn flavour profiles and during that year you can decide on what type of spices and sauces you like and what you think the other judges like ( or are scoring well)

I would do EXACTLY that. And always remember that the bbq you make at home is probably not what is being put into boxes for judges at competitions. My wife builds boxes, walks them when I am crunched for time, and grabs things from the cooler for me. She feels very helpful and needed, and she doesn't have to cook.

MikeJ65
01-31-2014, 02:57 PM
Write detailed recipes and have her follow them. You should have a recipe sufficient to reproduce the cook every time you compete. Otherwise, you are trying to improve on some random, unrepeatable outcome.

As a side note, I would start with commercial rubs and sauces. Plenty of things to worry about other than making a better rub, sauce, or injection than winning teams sell for a few bucks a jar.

Offthehook
01-31-2014, 03:06 PM
Best advise ever.... register her for a CBJ and then go to judge a few events with her. Take a year to learn flavour profiles and during that year you can decide on what type of spices and sauces you like and what you think the other judges like ( or are scoring well)

Remember good BBQ is not necessarily Competition BBQ, often they are two very different products
I think that is very solid advice.

My advice is take a class, don't try to teach your wife, I have been there. If money is an issue, Kosmos does a great dvd class and I have heard pitbulls up in smoke is a good online class.

Competition bbq is very complex, back yard bbq will get killed. Judges are looking for something familiar to them.

Curling Q
01-31-2014, 03:42 PM
I would do EXACTLY that. And always remember that the bbq you make at home is probably not what is being put into boxes for judges at competitions. My wife builds boxes, walks them when I am crunched for time, and grabs things from the cooler for me. She feels very helpful and needed, and she doesn't have to cook.

My Wife started out coming to comps with me and helping with these same things, she has developed into the most critical person on our team when it comes to building boxes and flavor profiles, which has helped us improve greatly. She has become a very valuable member of our team, and she almost never touches the cooker.

columbia1
01-31-2014, 04:12 PM
I would definitely consider paying for a judging class for both of you and then judge at least once, it will save you sooooo much time and headaches trying to figure out what flavor profiles the judges are looking for.

(edit) I imagine once you guys taste a real comp, the gears in your head will start to spin and you will quickly agree on a new flavor profile.

fat heads bbq
01-31-2014, 04:38 PM
you think she might enjoy doing anything butt?

fnbish
01-31-2014, 05:39 PM
Write detailed recipes and have her follow them. You should have a recipe sufficient to reproduce the cook every time you compete. Otherwise, you are trying to improve on some random, unrepeatable outcome.

As a side note, I would start with commercial rubs and sauces. Plenty of things to worry about other than making a better rub, sauce, or injection than winning teams sell for a few bucks a jar.

This is what I was thinking. Then she has the written reminders right there. And also the CBJ class is great advice. It will give her the knowledge of what the judges are looking for and also taste some of the food to show her that her flavors are not what they are looking for.

You could also politely level set with her and let her know you plan to take this very seriously. If she has any hobbies that she takes seriously she should understand better how attention to detail and understanding what this hobby takes to succeed matters to you.

Good luck :clap2:

didisea
01-31-2014, 06:15 PM
I don't think I would have your partner be responsible for cooking 2 of the meats. I would suggest a more "team" approach. Like someone suggested above, use commercial rubs and sauces. Then, you both can practice TOGETHER, tasting the food and deciding which you will go with. Then, if one of "yours" or "her" meats doesn't do so well, its a team takes the blame thing, and not YOUR bad chicken that let the team down.

When my partner and I cook, we butcher, season, and cook the food together. We build the parsley boxes together. There are times when I take first shift in the am, and there are times where he takes first shift in the morning. But we each test and we agree on whether the meat is done. There are strengths that each of us bring to the team (he can run fast!), and some roles that we generally take at each comp, but for the most part we can each do whatever needs to be done at any given time. When it comes to boxing the meat, for example, in pork, I do the slices, and he does the pulled pork. I cook 2 briskets, we each slice one of them and then decide which one we go with. Chicken, we both pick out which pieces we are going to put in the box.

If you spend time even before you practice talking through the cook, explaining what the game plan is during each phase of the cook, and what you expect her to do, then she will be a great teammate.

4uweque
01-31-2014, 06:58 PM
My wife and I cook as a team, I do all the cooking, she does the critiquing and builds and runs boxes. It works great for us.

FatCoyote
01-31-2014, 07:16 PM
I just yell at my wife, she gets made, then she yells at me and goes inside. I'm then left doing the bbq while she does "her thing" we both smile and all is well.

INmitch
01-31-2014, 08:08 PM
I think you have got a lot of good input here. Eventually you will come up with some good flavor profiles together. But if your going to stay in this for the long haul you need to figure out a pecking order.
Here is ours:
I basically do everything. Trimming, prepping, cook all 4 meats with an agree on flavor profiles. She makes boxes and is the final word on what goes in the boxes.
After 6 years do we argue?.....Oh hail yes.:doh: But so far it has worked out.
In time you will figure out each others strong points, and use it to your advantage!!


That is what successful TEAMS (remeber your a team) do!!