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View Full Version : Group Discussion #5 Cutting boards


bbqjoe
05-25-2006, 11:49 AM
What is your preferred cutting board?
Why?
What else do you know about cutting boards?

kcquer
05-25-2006, 12:23 PM
HDPE for raw and cooked meats (non-porous), wood for veggies and breads.

Arlin_MacRae
05-25-2006, 01:15 PM
I've got a huge plastic one that allows me to prep a lot of meat at once, but my favorite is a small one made from Corian.

And I clean them after each use with Comet to kill the nasties.

cmcadams
05-25-2006, 01:45 PM
I use wood. It's best on my knives and naturally inhibits bacteria growth, or so I'm told. I've also heard that the plastic boards, once scored, trap bacteria so that you can't really get them clean.

I use wood, but different boards for different types of foods.

BigDaddy
05-25-2006, 03:15 PM
I second what Curt said, and I try to clean with diluted bleach after cutting raw meat.

BigDaddy

www.davidheffner.com (http://www.davidheffner.com)

Dakaty
05-25-2006, 03:37 PM
We have a nice set of Quisinart nylon/plastic cutting boards that now have a bunch of knife scoring marks in them, which I'm sure must trap bacteria and germs. I would think that wood would also absorb stuff.

I have seen the cutting board protective "sheets" that are disposable. Has anyone used these? I may give them a try, but as many times as I wash and reuse my cutting boards, they may be too expensive.

big brother smoke
05-25-2006, 03:55 PM
I use color coded boards i.e. brown = cooked meats; red= raw;
yellow = raw poultry, etc. Bleach and soap to clean.

CharlieBeasley
05-25-2006, 06:06 PM
I use wood and plastic but like the bamboo cutting board. I understand the wood does not carry the bacteria as badly as the plastic.

tigger
05-25-2006, 06:47 PM
I use them all, wood, bamboo and plastic. I grab the one that whatever I'm cutting up doesn't hang off the edges. However, I have not succeeded in keeping all the diced onions on the board now matter how big it is.

Rockaway BeachBQ
05-25-2006, 09:45 PM
I use wood exclusively. I have an 18"x24" maple wood John Boos Board that is on my Kitchen island at all times (so no one does something stupid like cut on the maple top of the Island). Then a selection of smaller boards, my favorite being a bamboo board from Shun.

The Maple Board had started to split at the ends during the winter, but those have closed up now (same with my Pizza peel). The bamboo board seems to need less maintenance. I probably oil my boards every 3 or 4 months as opposed to the 6 week reccomended intervals.

At my school and most restaraunts they use plastic or some sort of hard rubber, and your knife really digs in to those. I have seen slivers of the board come up from the tips of filet knifes when fabricating fish.

A good wood board can be sanded down when it wears out or starts to dish. Plastic are just garbage at that point.

Sledneck
05-25-2006, 10:41 PM
I think i have a piece of butcher block left over from a job that is
2'-0" X 7-0" X 1 1/2" thick. If anybody round here wants a piece cut off of it let me know the size. Its brand new in the box

bbqjoe
05-25-2006, 10:44 PM
I think i have a piece of butcher block left over from a job that is
2'-0" X 7-0" X 1 1/2" thick. If anybody round here wants a piece cut off of it let me know the size. Its brand new in the box
Can you stuff that in an envolope and send it to me?
*looking around for stamps*

kcquer
05-25-2006, 11:39 PM
A good wood board can be sanded down when it wears out or starts to dish. Plastic are just garbage at that point.

That's what I like about HDPE, it sands to new condition just like wood without the porous, bacteria hiding quality of wood.

rbsnwngs
05-26-2006, 04:03 AM
I think i have a piece of butcher block left over from a job that is
2'-0" X 7-0" X 1 1/2" thick. If anybody round here wants a piece cut off of it let me know the size. Its brand new in the box
hey if you lug 2x3 of that out to islip ill take it. or i can just caome and get

BobberQer
05-26-2006, 05:30 AM
I'd be more than happy to take a piece off your hands.. thanks, Steve

Yakfishingfool
05-26-2006, 08:03 AM
For cutting boards, I have the white plastic stuff, use it often. when it does get ridges in it, it's like my yaks, I can either scrape it a bit to smooth them out, or a small amount of heat from a torch will reduce the hills and valleys. I also make it a habit of using a corian cutting board that I got in maine. very nice. I usually pop both into the dishwasher after I had clean to get it as sanitized as possible. I really need to make a blue meat cutting board and a white everything else cutting board. Scott

cmcadams
05-26-2006, 08:12 AM
I have corian countertops, but never cut on them, as it's hard on my knives. If I get some sort of windfall, I'd consider a thick butcher block island, like 24" thick, with knife slots on one side.

roknrandy
05-26-2006, 10:02 AM
I use color coded boards i.e. brown = cooked meats; red= raw;
yellow = raw poultry, etc. Bleach and soap to clean.

I use the same boards as smoke, When you have imune systems problems like me I have to be anal :oops: about the boards and make sure they get cleaned so that cross contamination isnt an issue. Different colors for different items. The only difference is after a quick bleach scrub (I keep a spray bottle of bleach & water under the sink) mine go into the diswasher just to make sure.

queball
05-26-2006, 10:53 AM
I use both wood and Bamboo. The bamboo seems to be very durable and relatively maintenance free. My wood board, which is probably 15 years only and is end grain Maple has been been rode hard and put up wet but just seems to get better with age. It dishes a bit but still my favorite.

bbqbull
05-26-2006, 06:37 PM
I use strictly plastic cutting boards. I dont use them for prep unless trimming fat or pulling membranes off ribs. Then into hot soapy water, then bleach water rinse. When prepping done/cooked food, One board for each item. Then hot soapy water and bleach rinse again.

Lazy Dawg
05-26-2006, 07:03 PM
I think i have a piece of butcher block left over from a job that is
2'-0" X 7-0" X 1 1/2" thick. If anybody round here wants a piece cut off of it let me know the size. Its brand new in the box


Hey Steve if your offer still stands and there is enough I would love a piece. Say 2X2

The Woodman
05-27-2006, 05:47 PM
I use strictly plastic cutting boards. I dont use them for prep unless trimming fat or pulling membranes off ribs. Then into hot soapy water, then bleach water rinse. When prepping done/cooked food, One board for each item. Then hot soapy water and bleach rinse again.

Same here. HDPE wash, rinse, sanitize. I work for a company that was selling them and when we closed out the line, I bought 20 -24x24" boards. They are yellow and blue for HAACP designation (think it's poultry and fish?) I'm set for the next 10 years! Woody

GIRLYQUE
07-21-2006, 10:35 AM
We typically use the wood. Much better on the knives. But...for chicken we use the white plastic ones. But only while the surface stays smooth enough to clean properly. Once they are chopped up we toss them.

tommykendall
07-21-2006, 11:53 AM
We typically use the wood. Much better on the knives. But...for chicken we use the white plastic ones. But only while the surface stays smooth enough to clean properly. Once they are chopped up we toss them.

Never thought of this before but why not sand them down a little with a Makita hand-held finisher?

bbqjoe
07-21-2006, 11:56 AM
The plastic boards, when "Chopped up" Can be sanded quite a few times in order to get the surface smooth again. I do mine every so often. When you work with them day after day, sometimes it's easy not to notice that they are indeed due for a resurfacing and a good bleaching.

voodoobbqIL
07-28-2006, 10:27 AM
WE use all kinds different stuff for different things. WE label the white sani-safe ones with the designation on the edge. Since they are smooth on both sides, one is labeled "moo" with black arrow, "oink" with red arrow, and then another board is "cluck". I like the smooth and "blood trough" models depending on what you are doing. I use some of that new shelf liner stuff that is non-skid to keep from cutting any digits off of my hands from board slide...very handy in a humidity rich environment, like a contest.

WE have a butcher block made out of Texas Long Left Pine, it is nice for veggies and stuff I don't do a lot of meat as it requires a bit of upkeep and sanding it is a bit of like something you would see on ESPN great outdoors games. I have several other maple boards that travel with us for slicing at turn in time.

On the subject of the plastic boards, we usually toss them once they get cut up. According to the Sani-safe and Vollrath folks that is the best thing to do. I keep a couple in the garage to use as carry platters for hot items they make great trivets for the table. For cleaning them while they are still good I wash them really well and spray with clorox-water and let air dry. Supposedly that kills all the stuff that makes you have to lay on the floor and count the bathroom tiles.

I think the best boards are the one that feel best for you, and don't tear up your good knives.

VitaminQ
07-28-2006, 11:00 AM
I use plastic. I've got three that I'm constantly washing so as to minimize the possibility of cross-contaminiation. They've held up pretty well over the years.

On a related note, at work we're experimenting with making signs out of Corian. We ordered a few 2 x 3 cutting boards and are putting vinyl letters on them. It's kinda cool.

FatDad
07-28-2006, 06:13 PM
On a related note, at work we're experimenting with making signs out of Corian. We ordered a few 2 x 3 cutting boards and are putting vinyl letters on them. It's kinda cool.

Corian sounds like some tough stuff.
http://www2.dupont.com/Corian/en_GB/uses_apps/food.html

nancee
07-30-2006, 12:06 PM
We use the giant plastic ones from the restaurant supply houses, Through the years we have had various problems with health departments over the appearence of the boards even though they are cleaned and bleched constantly. We finally sprung for new ones before Harpoon and they sure didn't look new very long! I would not dare to bring wood on the circuit; the health inspectors can be ...shall we say eccentric?

Rockaway BeachBQ
08-01-2006, 02:18 AM
Isn't corian very hard? Does it dull blades quickly?


I noticed that in the brochure for Corian countertops they had a wood cutting board.

Brauma
08-01-2006, 08:19 PM
We have 3 plastic ones and they have gotten pretty sliced up over the years. Ive been thinking about replacing/upgrading. Never heard of bamboo before. So you guys recommend it?

Also, Ive been wanting a good butcher block table for the kitchen. Anybody know where I can find one. Im thinking small like 3 foot square or there-abouts.

CharlieBeasley
08-02-2006, 07:25 AM
We use the giant plastic ones from the restaurant supply houses, Through the years we have had various problems with health departments over the appearence of the boards even though they are cleaned and bleched constantly. We finally sprung for new ones before Harpoon and they sure didn't look new very long! I would not dare to bring wood on the circuit; the health inspectors can be ...shall we say eccentric?

Interesting that the health inspectors are allowed to be eccentric when everything I have read indicates that wood both has graws and stores less bacteria than plastic and clean better as well. Preference is one thing but the ability to make decisions based on it by professional people who are supposed to keep up with what the rules are is another.? Oh well bureaucracy!