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View Full Version : What's your usual pit temp for a comp?


Waterboy12
01-03-2014, 11:12 AM
I did a search and didn't really find what I was looking for. What pit temp do you usually cook at through the duration of a comp? Low and slow through out the night or fire up early Saturday morning and cook hot and fast? I'll be using my Lang 36 and weber bullit and planed to rock and roll at 300(my Lang Cadillacs at 300* with minimal effort). Just looking for opinions. Thanks, josh.

scm1226
01-03-2014, 11:42 AM
We start at 240 then it drops to 180 we freak out and then it goes to 325 and then back to 260 and cruises in at about 285 all within the 10 hours we are cooking our big meats!! HAHA no seriously i have the guru set at about 245. But we are still figuring it out.

Fat Freddy
01-03-2014, 11:47 AM
I fire up my 22WSM at 1:30am to get to 275* by 3am. Then at 6am I fire up an 18 WSM to be at 275* when I need it. So I cook everything at 275*, but I do adjust times depending on weather or other circumstances.

Smokedelic
01-03-2014, 12:25 PM
I did a search and didn't really find what I was looking for. What pit temp do you usually cook at through the duration of a comp? Low and slow through out the night or fire up early Saturday morning and cook hot and fast? I'll be using my Lang 36 and weber bullit and planed to rock and roll at 300(my Lang Cadillacs at 300* with minimal effort). Just looking for opinions. Thanks, josh.If your Lang "Cadillacs at 300* with minimal effort", I'd learn how to cook everything at 300*. But that's just my opinion.:wink:

BB-Kuhn
01-03-2014, 12:27 PM
I keep my WSM at 250 +/- 10 deg. I usually keep a hotter setup (325-350) usually my weber kettle on hand for crisping chicken.

fnbish
01-03-2014, 12:34 PM
Josh everyone is going to be a little different here and I'm not sure if just giving temps gives you enough information to be helpful. Unless you are just curious in general of course :-D.

Some folks run one steady temp the entire night and day. Some run low over night and ramp up hotter in the morning when more meat goes on. Some run 2 pits at 2 different temps. Some start at 4am and run 350 hot and fast and then back it down towards then end for chicken.

The time and temp really depend on how you want to cook the meat and if that temp works with the recipe you are working with. Running 350 might darken brown sugar on ribs out in the open vs a person running 225-250 for example.

fnbish
01-03-2014, 12:36 PM
We start at 240 then it drops to 180 we freak out and then it goes to 325 and then back to 260 and cruises in at about 285 all within the 10 hours we are cooking our big meats!! HAHA no seriously i have the guru set at about 245. But we are still figuring it out.

This is awesome :laugh::clap2:

ShencoSmoke
01-03-2014, 12:56 PM
If your Lang "Cadillacs at 300* with minimal effort", I'd learn how to cook everything at 300*. But that's just my opinion.:wink:

^this! Don't fight your equipment if you don't have to. Another thing to remember is folks measure temps differently. Some digitally, some at grate level, some at higher locations in the pit, etc, etc. someone else's 275 may or may not be the same as 275 on your pit.

Waterboy12
01-03-2014, 01:03 PM
Josh everyone is going to be a little different here and I'm not sure if just giving temps gives you enough information to be helpful. Unless you are just curious in general of course :-D.

Some folks run one steady temp the entire night and day. Some run low over night and ramp up hotter in the morning when more meat goes on. Some run 2 pits at 2 different temps. Some start at 4am and run 350 hot and fast and then back it down towards then end for chicken.

The time and temp really depend on how you want to cook the meat and if that temp works with the recipe you are working with. Running 350 might darken brown sugar on ribs out in the open vs a person running 225-250 for example.

I was just curious to see how other teams operate. I know I can cook the majority of meats at 300* no problem with the exception of ribs. I'm gonna be expiramenting with a 300* rib cook this weekend with a low sugar content rub to eliminate the chance of sugar burn. We will see how it goes.

I don't know of anything other comp bbq teams in my area to ask questions to so the brethren are/is my best/only resource.

Keep the info coming guys!

Offthehook
01-03-2014, 01:26 PM
I set my stoker to 275 and dont mess with anything.

Lake Dogs
01-03-2014, 02:24 PM
What f'in bish said; everyone different. Me, except for chicken (I rarely cook chicken in comps any longer, but that's another story) or whole hog, I cook them all (butts, whole shoulders, ribs, briskets, etc.) on the one smoker, 260-275, but that's largely because my Lang 84 "Cadillac's" right there.

Waterboy12
01-03-2014, 02:40 PM
What f'in bish said; everyone different. Me, except for chicken (I rarely cook chicken in comps any longer, but that's another story) or whole hog, I cook them all (butts, whole shoulders, ribs, briskets, etc.) on the one smoker, 260-275, but that's largely because my Lang 84 "Cadillac's" right there.

I like to Cadillac! Lol

ButtBurner
01-03-2014, 02:50 PM
Cadillacs?

what?

(check my avatar)

:redface:

DaveAlvarado
01-03-2014, 03:01 PM
I don't compete (yet), but I'm working on recipes that use 250 for the big meats and 275 for chicken and ribs. Competition setup will be two 22" WSMs.

Waterboy12
01-03-2014, 03:24 PM
We'll unless I can convince the executive financial director to let me add a WSM to the comp arsenal I will be cooking all 4 categories on my 36. Which means it will all come down to timing and execution. If I can cook at one temp the whole way through it will simplify everything drastically. My Lang "Cadillacs" at around 300* both dampers wide open and 1 split an hour and she's locked on. I plan on using that to my advantage the best I can. I'll adjust temps/timing if/when the EFD approves my request for a WSM.

bruno994
01-03-2014, 04:32 PM
250 on my lower grates for ribs and brisket, 285-300 on the upper grate for chicken. Running a custom built RF pit.

RumRunner_1492
01-03-2014, 05:17 PM
I cook everything on my Stump's. I have always cooked at 250 for brisket and pork and kicked it up to 300 for ribs and chicken. I just cooked a pork butt at 275 this past weekend and was really happy with the results. I will be running a few more test runs to see if I want to change to 275 possibly for everything.

CBQ
01-03-2014, 06:27 PM
When I cooked on an offset, I could get 180 in the vertical, 225 at the far end of the horizontal, and 350 near the firebox all at the same time. We put different meats in different places at different times, and used the temp zones to our advantage. Makes the answer to "What temp do you cook at?" kind of vague though.

EverettBBQ
01-03-2014, 07:17 PM
I am all over the place
225 to 275
Think I like running at 250 min
Using vertical charcoal Rebel 17
I can hit 250 and run study as a rock
If you run hot, you need to rest a lot

buttburnersbbq
01-03-2014, 07:34 PM
We run between 225 - 250. We cook low and slow.

Know Bull
01-04-2014, 12:02 AM
From what I have seen, it does not matter what temperature you cook at. Highly successful teams cook at 225; highly successful teams cook at 300; and even more successful teams cook at varying temperatures in between. They just understand what to do at the temp they are cooking at; and more importantly, they adjust their timeline for the temp they are using.

If you are cooking on a Lang reverse flow, I would suggest low and slow. My belief is that the baffle in a reverse flow presents a special problem. If you try to cook at 275 or higher, the baffle at the bottom of the cook chamber gets so hot that you get acrid smoke in the cooking chamber from the grease burning as it falls on the baffle plate. The temp below the plate will exceed the burn point of the fat, and the burn point of sugar. Reverse flows are designed to be low and slow cookers. The manufacturer may not tell you that, but they certainly do not want to tell you that the cooker may not be well suited for what you want to do. You should use the tools in the manner that they were designed. You would not use a screwdriver to drive a nail, would you?
If you really want to cook hot and fast, an offset would be the proper tool. You see a lot of Jambos running at 275 and 300; they are designed to perform their best at hot and fast temperatures.

Personally, I recently purchased an FEC100 (because I value sleep). I start off big meats at 180, then go to 250 after wrapping. Ribs are at 260. I am rethinking my chicken process, and my cooking tool for chicken, but it will be at higher temps (likely 325 and up). I don't think that those are necessarily the best temps to cook at; I just think that is the best temps for the tools that I have.

The process is far more about timetables and maximizing efficiency than it is about finding that magic temperature or flavor. Or at least IMHO.

K-Train
01-04-2014, 08:37 AM
250-275

Shiz-Nit
01-04-2014, 10:29 AM
it depends on which smoker I am using and if it is a comp, catering or just backyard for family. But since this question is in the comp section I will say I run my backwoods competitor at comps with a bbq guru set at 275. I also allow the smoker to come up to temp slow on its own before I hook the guru up. This will be for brisket, pork, ribs and I run my Eggs or WSM hotter for chicken temp depends on which cut of chicken (dark or white) I plain on turning in.

Hawg Father of Seoul
01-04-2014, 12:15 PM
If you run hot, you need to rest a lot

Not always true. We cook at 400 and 300. Why fire a pit up before 7?

DepChief22
01-04-2014, 04:27 PM
We fire the pit about an hour before we put any meats on. I set my guru at 300 put everything on then lower it to 250. It will stay there all night.

Gerrit_Boys
01-04-2014, 04:38 PM
Our Lang 84 runs really easily at 265-275 so that is where I run it whenever I'm cooking. I don't get any weird flavors from the drippings hitting the RF plate and periodically the judges will agree!!:grin:

wjwheeler
01-04-2014, 09:20 PM
350 brisket & butts
300 chicken & ribs