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Wicked Smoke BBQ
12-27-2013, 09:04 PM
Is there a time table anywhere that gets used? I'm talking about cooking things at certain temps that proceed with the lengths of times you cook it.

Ron_L
12-27-2013, 09:07 PM
Everyone who competes has one, but each one is unique to that team's cooking style, cooking temperatures and cooker(s) so it's doubtful that anyone's time table will do you any good.

The best thing to do is practice each meat until you have a good feel for your own timing and then put together a time table based on that.

fat heads bbq
12-28-2013, 06:00 PM
try this.

http://howtobbqright.com/kcbscookingcontesttimeline.html

SkinEz
12-28-2013, 06:02 PM
^^^^^^
Thats a pretty good one.

MattG
12-28-2013, 07:45 PM
Time and practice. Next time you cook write down everything start time, meat, injection, rub, wood, charcoal, lump, temp, weather, lbs of meat, wrap or not, what you put in the wrap, etc. Then you'll start to have a great time table for you and your cooker.

Wicked Smoke BBQ
12-28-2013, 11:00 PM
Thanks. I'm looking for something a little different. Let me try this;

If I cook at 230 degree's what's the general rule of thumb for length of time?
Same with 250, 275, so on and so fourth.

Fat Freddy
12-28-2013, 11:31 PM
There is nothing wrong with asking and maybe someone will give you the info you are wanting, but the reason you might not be getting quite what you are looking for is because many of us paid a lot of money from a class to get our timelines.

If it is my own info that I came up with on my own I will be happy to share, but I am not the type to give up someone elses info. Right now i only have a different type time line for chicken and it is still in the experimental/practice phase.

NRA4Life
12-29-2013, 09:17 AM
I don't think you're going to get the definitive answer you want because there isn't one. Barbeque is done when it's done. Follow MattG's advice and establish what works for you on your cooker.

rolfejr
12-29-2013, 09:46 AM
Thanks. I'm looking for something a little different. Let me try this;

If I cook at 230 degree's what's the general rule of thumb for length of time?
Same with 250, 275, so on and so fourth.

Very difficult to do.
If every cut of meat was the same weight, came from the same animal, cooked with the exact amount of fuel, in the exact same ambient temperature, you may have something to work with.

But the beauty of BBq cooking is managing the variables.
What to do when the cooker runs hotter/cooler. How to manage a thick/thin brisket. What to do when the wind blows and the rains fall.
There is no "general rule" and that is why it's hard to do.
Even with practice, the curveballs come when the contest starts.

fnbish
12-29-2013, 10:43 AM
Thanks. I'm looking for something a little different. Let me try this;

If I cook at 230 degree's what's the general rule of thumb for length of time?
Same with 250, 275, so on and so fourth.

Hey wicked smoke. Is this a more general question not related to competition? Q Talk is great for the more general stuff.

I know you haven't gotten the direct answer you were looking for and this type of question has been asked before with similar responses. While I do cautiously agree that bbq "is done when its done" I also know my estimated times on my cooker. So my times would be different than your times at a certain temp. Also times vary from a thin 15lb brisket to a thick 15lb brisket. That being said I put a link that has some guidelines below as I believe a chart can be a good starting point of reference to then learn your own times off of.

I don't fully agree with all the times in the site, but it is a start.

http://www.smoking-meat.com/smoking-times-and-temperatures-chart

INmitch
12-29-2013, 01:06 PM
For what it's worth here are my timelines for normal turnin times at KCBS comps. I cook at 250*.
chicken goes on at 9:15am
ribs go on at 7am
pork goes on at 10pm but don't go by that cause I have a weird way of bringing my smoker up to temp.:wacko:
brisket (flat only) goes on at 3:30am

AZScott
12-29-2013, 04:30 PM
Do a practice cook just as you would a comp and you will have your times.

rookiedad
12-29-2013, 09:14 PM
But the beauty of BBq cooking is managing the variables..

wish i said that!!! grab onto a basic timeline or meat cooking time chart and go from there. eventually you will learn your smokers temps over time periods and be able to controll them to get the exact results you want. you will start cutting meat down to exact weights and shapes to get times to coencide with temps. Harry Soo even talks about doing oven runs at stable temperatures before ever moving to a smoker.

Branded BBQ
12-30-2013, 10:11 AM
I agree with all the above. I've found that although there are "General Guidelines" on how long to cook each meat... the fact is that the actual time of cooking has so many variables and considerations. For instance... the brisket I smoke in June is not on the same time as the brisket I smoke in late December. The chicken I smoke on my patio smoker isn't done at the same time as the chicken on my competition smoker.

The definite answer to your question really is that there is no definite answer.