PDA

View Full Version : Staphylococcus Bacteria *Complete*


bbqjoe
05-17-2006, 01:50 AM
Staphylococcus is a bacteria that is found on skin, infected skin, hair, noses and mouths.
This is a toxin producing bacteria.
Which means once food is contaminated by the bacteria, the bacteria then produce toxins.
These toxins cause Diarrhea, vomiting, nausea, abdominal pain, cramps and prostration. Fortunately this toxin is rarely fatal.

Unfortunately, once this toxin has infected food, it cannot be destroyed by heat, cooking, or reheating.

The question is: What percent of the population carries this bacteria?

__________________________________________________ ____________________

The answer is: 50-75%

It appears that almost all of us carry staph.
The only things you can do to prevent contaminating food with staph. Is to NEVER touch your eyes, face or nose when handling food.
If you do, stop and scrub up!
Of course, sneezing and coughing are equally as bad.

Remember, This bacteria produces a toxin that cannot be destroyed by cooking or heating.
There is no way to just look at food and determine if it has been infected by such a bacteria.


Almost invaribly when prepping or cooking, that facial itch or bead of sweat will call for you to attend it.

Hint: Nothing wrong with raising your arm and using the shoulder or shirt sleeve in an emergency.

Bigmista
05-17-2006, 11:26 AM
Crap! I can't get any of these right! Gonna start looking it up before I answer!

Dakaty
05-17-2006, 02:28 PM
No Cheating Big Mista!!!!

Arlin_MacRae
05-17-2006, 04:43 PM
A lovely little bug...

BobberQer
05-17-2006, 05:01 PM
isnt staph gotten by people who do not carry the stappacoculous??? might need a medical opinion on that one

The_Kapn
05-17-2006, 05:01 PM
No Cheating Big Mista!!!!

Cheating???
I think anything we do to learn more is a good thing 8-)

I certainly am learning here.

TIM

Yakfishingfool
05-17-2006, 06:26 PM
Staph is a common normal flora I believe. I would have bet all of us have staph on us. I'd go for D) It's actually 100%. Just my guess.

Normal flora is a stew of bacteria and virus that exists in our bodies all the time. the flora of the mouth, stomach, eye, skin, bladder, etc are all variable, but normal for that area. we don;t get sick from them. But of there is a damaged area, ie a cut, the nromal flora acan penetrate our first defense, the skin, and replicate faster than we can eat them and thus infection is born. Scott

Yakfishingfool
05-19-2006, 09:33 AM
The schools now teach a public health technique of sneezing and coughing by doing it into your elbow, bend the arma nd cough or sneeze into the bend of your arm. Sure, occaisionally a loogi left behind, but keeps the food clean. Scott

Arlin_MacRae
05-19-2006, 09:47 AM
Nicely done, Joe. Thanks.

Wayne
05-19-2006, 08:17 PM
There are lots of Staphylococcus types and they are not all pathogenic or toxic. They are little round balls that clump together and look like grapes. For example there is Staphylococcus Epidermidis is not pathogenic and is probably present on the skin of every human on earth (100%). That is why it is named Epidermidis. It is part of the normal flora on our skin.

Then there is staphylococcus aureus which is pathogenic and can make you sick with everything from zits to pneumonia. But our bodies can fight these little buggers of pretty efficiently and most infections are localized in the form of puss filled pockets. This is why food handlers are not suppose to have any cuts or rashes on their hands and arms. If S. aureus gets into the blood stream they cause toxic shock that can lead to death. The little guys produce a protein that causes blood cells to pop (hemolytic).

The S. epidermidis cannot cause blood cells to pop and might even be beneficial to our skins health. There are lots of Staphylococcus species but these two are by far the most common. And that is all I remember from my Microbiology classes 35 years ago. Oh ya, I think they are all gram positive. The really bad bacteria are usually gram negative. Lastly, it is easy to kill bacteria. All you have to do is raise their temperature to 250 degrees with 15 pounds of pressure for 15 minutes. Pretty much standard for pressure cookers.

Sledneck
05-19-2006, 08:38 PM
Hold on while i get back in my bubble
http://img128.imageshack.us/img128/9422/bubbleboypic5gx.th.jpg (http://img128.imageshack.us/my.php?image=bubbleboypic5gx.jpg)

bbqjoe
05-19-2006, 10:27 PM
There are lots of Staphylococcus types and they are not all pathogenic or toxic. They are little round balls that clump together and look like grapes. For example there is Staphylococcus Epidermidis is not pathogenic and is probably present on the skin of every human on earth (100%). That is why it is named Epidermidis. It is part of the normal flora on our skin.

Then there is staphylococcus aureus which is pathogenic and can make you sick with everything from zits to pneumonia. But our bodies can fight these little buggers of pretty efficiently and most infections are localized in the form of puss filled pockets. This is why food handlers are not suppose to have any cuts or rashes on their hands and arms. If S. aureus gets into the blood stream they cause toxic shock that can lead to death. The little guys produce a protein that causes blood cells to pop (hemolytic).

The S. epidermidis cannot cause blood cells to pop and might even be beneficial to our skins health. There are lots of Staphylococcus species but these two are by far the most common. And that is all I remember from my Microbiology classes 35 years ago. Oh ya, I think they are all gram positive. The really bad bacteria are usually gram negative. Lastly, it is easy to kill bacteria. All you have to do is raise their temperature to 250 degrees with 15 pounds of pressure for 15 minutes. Pretty much standard for pressure cookers.

Good stuff there Wayne!
Good input.

But remember, the bad ones produce toxins (poisons) and the poison is not affected by heat.

Wayne
05-20-2006, 12:03 AM
Staphylococcus aureus is not Clostridium botulinum. Death is rare and people usually recover in 24 hours. An old rule of thumb it that if you get the flu for 24 hours or less then it is probably not the flu but S. aureus food poisoning. The toxin is pretty tough but I doubt that it would survive in a pressure cooker at 250 degrees for much longer than 10 minutes. The real secret is to fix your food so that the meat does not sit luke warm for any length of time. I believe that the danger zone is * degrees to * degrees. You need to pass through this range quickly. You must also keep your hands and utensils clean and free of bacteria, and avoid cross contamination.