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SkinEz
12-11-2013, 01:25 PM
I enjoy smoking, and everyone raves about my cooking. I have cooked for a couple little league functions, and some church gatherings. I was contemplating about trying to actually run some type of catering/concession business. I have been looking to see what licenses and the likes I need to acquire before I really jump in both feet. I also have been looking into putting together a business plan. Can anyone really line out what I need to focus on, before I drive myself crazy searching for a thousand different things. I appreciate any honest advice. And before you ask I am half nuts.

The Drill Sargent
12-11-2013, 03:40 PM
You can start with getting business licenses, serve-safe certifications, and obviously equipment. But also think about advertising, web site, social media. Will you be more of a food truck, or full service catering? Do you have Brick & mortar or totally mobile on site cooking? weddings, or corporate/vending. I guess I am asking do you know what you want to do besides just cook? Goal- is this supposed to support you or is it a hobby? Time commitment, If you are going all in, you won't be home much in the evenings. If you are doing mobile catering, you may need licenses for multiple counties in your area so you can reach a wider range. I know this is a lot but its all part of the picture.

HBMTN
12-11-2013, 05:26 PM
Is it worth it is a question we can not answer for you really. A lot of it depends on what you want to get out of it. If you currently have a job that you like and make decent money and enjoy some time off then no I would not recommend it. If you are looking for extra money and potentially replacing your current job then yes it can be great. You will not have a weekend life between April on November. I would suggest maybe interning with a caterer a few weeks or see if you can pull a few temporary permits to sell road side, that will give you an idea how you like it.

landarc
12-11-2013, 05:39 PM
I agree with HBMTN, we can't answer that for you. To some degree, that is a value call. I can tell you, for me, becoming a chef was a dream, then when I worked at it, while in high school and college, I realized that it was not for me. Too many long hours, not enough time away from work.

But, the way to start any business is with research. Talk with people in the business, talk to the health deparment, and food suppliers, research sourcing and wholesale costs and do the business plan. Once you build the business plan, with all the costs and time allotments, you will know where your passion lies.

SkinEz
12-11-2013, 06:18 PM
Thanks guys. To shed some light on the topic. I was a dual status technician with the WV National Guard, but was medically discharged and forced into early retirement. I returned to school to complete a degree I started years ago, and started smoking as a hobby. Ive competed in one competition 12th in pork was my best category, but i was running solo, and really needed some help. (wife couldnt make trip at last minute). However, I have cooked for a little league football banquet (about 100 people) and they seemed to love it. This could potentially become a full time gig for me, seeing how currently I am not tied to a job. I really have questions about the business plan, and how that all works out. I started a business plan on the small business website, and work on it from time to time. My vision is to acquire a trailer that I can use at competitions/and use for concession type sales. Also supplement that with catering, then possibly looking into a stick and mortar type joint further down the road. I have social media sites already with my name, and am looking into purchasing a domain name just to be safe. I have really started sticking my toes in the water, but not sure if I want to jump in.

HBMTN
12-11-2013, 06:57 PM
Based on your situation yes I would do it. You can spend $1000 or $100,000 to start up. Realistically $20,000-$40,000 start up costs and you can be your own boss. Lots of hard work but very rewarding, you can work hard during barbecue season and take several months off in the winter.

bizznessman
12-11-2013, 06:57 PM
This may give you an idea on what is involved with the business plan and may be a starting point for you. I am in no way saying that this is comprehensive but it may provide you the basics.

http://www.yourbusinesspal.com/barbecue-business-plan.html (http://www.yourbusinesspal.com/barbecue-business-plan.html)

Sample Bus Plan

http://www.yourbusinesspal.com/small_business_plan_sample.html (http://www.yourbusinesspal.com/small_business_plan_sample.html)

marubozo
12-11-2013, 08:30 PM
Is it worth it? It can be. It can also be a nightmare. Won't know until you try.

I bought a very small restaurant way back in May so I could open a BBQ joint. Here it is December and the doors still aren't officially open and I've sunk close to $75k into it so far and haven't had a paycheck since February.

Incredibly hard work, lots of stress, yet also a lot of joy and many rewards to go along with it. But above all else, turning your hobby into a business is not something to take lightly. If you plan accordingly and have the finances in place to make it happen, you could turn your life upside down for the better. But go into it without a solid plan or lack the capital required, and it could end up being the worst decision you've ever made.

Good luck!

pwa
12-12-2013, 02:19 AM
Is it worth it? It can be. It can also be a nightmare. Won't know until you try.

I bought a very small restaurant way back in May so I could open a BBQ joint. Here it is December and the doors still aren't officially open and I've sunk close to $75k into it so far and haven't had a paycheck since February.

Incredibly hard work, lots of stress, yet also a lot of joy and many rewards to go along with it. But above all else, turning your hobby into a business is not something to take lightly. If you plan accordingly and have the finances in place to make it happen, you could turn your life upside down for the better. But go into it without a solid plan or lack the capital required, and it could end up being the worst decision you've ever made.

Good luck!

I agree 100% with Marubozo it can be rewarding!! but be prepared for long hrs and lots of work. I like Marubozo started a new BBQ joint mine is Delivery/Take out and I still do limited catering from it (additional licensing for that in AK) IS it worth... for me it is. I employee my oldest son, I enjoy BS'ing with customers and the light I see after they eat my Q vs what they expect make me grin ear to ear. There are day even weeks I feel like I'm bang my head against a wall and not sleeping. But I'm a fool that decided to keep my day job as well :icon_blush:

Good luck and if there is anything I can do to help let me know

BigBellyBBQ
12-12-2013, 02:30 AM
yep your nuts, however jump in the water is warm! Just as long you can handle up / down days and long hours...

deguerre
12-12-2013, 08:49 AM
Well, right now, you're only half nuts. Go all the way nuts first...

The Cosmic Pig
12-12-2013, 09:06 PM
I'm staring retirement in the face (within the next 1 -2 years) and would also love to give it a shot for some extra income (read, to pay for health insurance, mostly). I just want to do some catering, and maybe a couple of weekends a month of roadside. Anyways, my "plan," if you can call it that, is to have nothing more than a mobile kitchen, which satisfies the HD here for most applications. In other words, I'm only going to jump in with "one foot;" if it works and I like it, I keep it up. If not, I sell out and try something else. There ARE ways to get in to the business without risking the farm, so to speak. My ex and I were in the catering business until she got lazy, and we actually did pretty well, so I do have some knowledge of how things work. I was also working full time at that time. If the catering would have been my full time job, I think it would have been quite enjoyable and even more successful! Being your own boss can be very rewarding in its own right, and your hard work pays off - which is not always the case in corporate America. So yes, it can be worth it! Good luck with whatever you decide to do!

SkinEz
12-17-2013, 06:50 PM
Just some more questions for the masses. I was looking online at mobile smokers, and I came accross http://easttexassmokercompany.com// Has anyone dealt with them? I am from West Virginia, and really dont want to have to go to Texas if I dont have to, but would gladly pay for quality. Any caterers really have good suggestions on mobile rigs? Also I am applying for a business license, and I seem to think an LLC is the way to go. Any input on this with the experienced gurus? Again Thanks...

kurtsara
12-17-2013, 09:07 PM
What can you use in WV? Do you need NSF? What capacity do you need? Do you want to babysit a smoker?

SkinEz
12-17-2013, 09:15 PM
What can you use in WV? Do you need NSF? What capacity do you need? Do you want to babysit a smoker?

Im in the process of talking to the HD right now to see exactly what kind of set up is feasible for me at the moment. I am leaning towards a catering type business where i can either cook on site, or deliver. It really depends on how my discussion with the HD goes. Good thing (I hope) is the guy I got ahold with I graduated high school with. So I hope this process is way less painful than it could be.

BigBellyBBQ
12-18-2013, 04:21 AM
if you want to stay partially sane, use a smoker you do not have to baby sit...offsets will tie you up..

SkinEz
12-18-2013, 06:37 AM
if you want to stay partially sane, use a smoker you do not have to baby sit...offsets will tie you up..

Any suggestions?

dwfisk
12-18-2013, 07:41 AM
Just some more questions for the masses. I was looking online at mobile smokers, and I came accross http://easttexassmokercompany.com// Has anyone dealt with them? I am from West Virginia, and really dont want to have to go to Texas if I dont have to, but would gladly pay for quality. Any caterers really have good suggestions on mobile rigs? Also I am applying for a business license, and I seem to think an LLC is the way to go. Any input on this with the experienced gurus? Again Thanks...

Take a look at these http://www.shirleyfabrication.com/ and PM fellow Brethren TuscaloosaQ, you won't regret it and it is a bunch closer than TX!

ButtBurner
12-18-2013, 09:03 AM
Take a look at these http://www.shirleyfabrication.com/ and PM fellow Brethren TuscaloosaQ, you won't regret it and it is a bunch closer than TX!

Agreed.

I am preparing to order a patio cooker from Paul.

SkinEz
12-19-2013, 02:16 PM
I feel like I am beating a dead horse here, but I do really like the feedback. If I do end up with a brick and mortar type joint what are the thoughts on gravity fed, reverse flow, type smokers. I mainly cook on my UDS, and love it. However, I am starting to wonder if these types would be better for quantity, purposes. I wouldnt mind owning a fleet of UDS's, but that seems redundant...

va_connoisseur
12-19-2013, 02:49 PM
For commercial establishments, I see a lot of Southern Prides (http://www.southern-pride.com/_new/products/smokers.php?category=gas) or Old Hickory's (http://www.olehickorypits.com/)

SkinEz
12-20-2013, 01:42 PM
I am meeting with the Health department rep tomorrow to see what regulations for what business types are needed in my area. I am hoping to get involved in a catering type of business. I would love to someday acquire a southern pride, or olehickory for a brick and mortar joint. However, I am not at that level yet. I was leaning towards a towable reverse flow, or a portable gravity fed type. I do competitions, and wondered which ones would be more beneficial to both. Right now I use a UDS, and love it. But, I need to start thinking about quantity. I know the reverse flow type cooker i.e. Lang are considered stick burners, but can you use a charcoal basket, and would that make it a little more user friendly?

SkinEz
12-20-2013, 01:42 PM
I am meeting with the Health department rep tomorrow to see what regulations for what business types are needed in my area. I am hoping to get involved in a catering type of business. I would love to someday acquire a southern pride, or olehickory for a brick and mortar joint. However, I am not at that level yet. I was leaning towards a towable reverse flow, or a portable gravity fed type. I do competitions, and wondered which ones would be more beneficial to both. Right now I use a UDS, and love it. But, I need to start thinking about quantity. I know the reverse flow type cooker i.e. Lang are considered stick burners, but can you use a charcoal basket, and would that make it a little more user friendly?

not tomorrow I meant Monday morning...

The Cosmic Pig
12-20-2013, 09:52 PM
You'd still have to feed it wood most of the night. Have you considered a pellet cooker? Folks are coming up with ways to get more smoke flavor out of them, and they're set-it-and-forget-it, so it would be hard to go wrong there. Also, there are some good gravity-fed charcoal smokers that regulate well - according to other folks - but I don't have any experience with them. But the last thing I would want to do is tend a fire all night and run a business all day. That would get old fast! Good luck in whatever you decide to do!

awscwi
12-21-2013, 08:31 AM
Agreed.

I am preparing to order a patio cooker from Paul.

Yep i would talk to Paul first. I have a patio cooker on order from him ( 24x50 )
with warmer.

I looked a a Lang, but after talking to Paul i had to go with him.

SkinEz
12-21-2013, 09:41 AM
Yep i would talk to Paul first. I have a patio cooker on order from him ( 24x50 )
with warmer.

I looked a a Lang, but after talking to Paul i had to go with him.

Certainly going to talk to him. PMd him just waiting on good time for him to chat. Looking forward to that conversation. Been really looking over his website. Looks like a good product, and the price is certainly worth considering.

CivilWarBBQ
12-21-2013, 01:29 PM
If you are truly disabled you will want to honestly assess your physical ability. Food service requires long hours standing on hard floors. The commercial kitchen is a hot, greasy environment that usually is loaded with stress. Hiring staff usually creates as many issues as it solves. For example just recently our night cook on duty forgot to run pork the night before we had 80lbs to deliver for lunch the next day. Yeah, big fun.

If you have not worked in food service before, I HIGHLY recommend that you do so before you invest a bunch of money or quit your day job. Find an existing restaurant or catering outfit and go to work there for a couple months - offer to do it for free if you must. (Doesn't have to be a BBQ place) You will learn a ton about the realities of the business. This will either reassure you that you can do it better or tear down the romantic visions of "having a restaurant" that lead so many to invest their savings into a business that fails in the couple years.

SkinEz
12-21-2013, 02:06 PM
If you are truly disabled you will want to honestly assess your physical ability. Food service requires long hours standing on hard floors. The commercial kitchen is a hot, greasy environment that usually is loaded with stress. Hiring staff usually creates as many issues as it solves. For example just recently our night cook on duty forgot to run pork the night before we had 80lbs to deliver for lunch the next day. Yeah, big fun.

If you have not worked in food service before, I HIGHLY recommend that you do so before you invest a bunch of money or quit your day job. Find an existing restaurant or catering outfit and go to work there for a couple months - offer to do it for free if you must. (Doesn't have to be a BBQ place) You will learn a ton about the realities of the business. This will either reassure you that you can do it better or tear down the romantic visions of "having a restaurant" that lead so many to invest their savings into a business that fails in the couple years.

This is why I love this place. That was probably the most honest answer I have read. To clarify, my left leg and hand have nerve damage. I wear a brace to walk, and my hand has about 45% of normal strength. This is one reason I am trying the competition circuit. To see if I can handle long hours, working on a schedule, and the stress. I stated earlier I can't do it alone. What I haven't stated is my brother is actively involved also. He has worked as a line cook before, and I am more managerial savvy. Hence, I'm doing all the research (licenses, business plan, health department). While he is focusing on the how's. He's more of the doer while I'm more of the thinker. One thing I've read is either people are doers, but not managers, or vice versa. I think we compliment each other well. Besides, the obvious ( never get in business with family) pitfalls. This is really the only feasible option for this to work. However , this is all in dream (planning phase) it is a real option for me. I don't have a day job, returned to school to get a management degree. So trust me I have asked myself those exact questions. My problem is I'm too stubborn to know better. However, once I get everything in paper in front of me, and a solid plan to look at, that's when the decision will be made. Thanks for the honest comment.

CivilWarBBQ
12-21-2013, 11:44 PM
My pleasure. Since you gave your story, let me give you my own. Maybe it will be of some use to you.

I spent the 90's piddling around with BBQ as a hobby, creating a line of sauces made from scratch, cooking for parties, the odd fundraiser etc. "Everybody" kept telling me how great my stuff was, and how I should market my sauces, get paid to cater events, open a restaurant, etc. I admit I thought about it and how cool it would be. But my day job as a partner in a computer business demanded most of my time and paid fairly well.

At the turn of the decade things to a sudden downturn for me. The DotCom Bubble burst, the economy tanked and I fell off a scaffold working on my house and shattered a leg which took two expensive surgeries to fix and kept me in bed for six months before it began to regain some function. My computer business closed and with the job market was flooded with out of work IT people, I went on unemployment. Things were pretty grim, and I started thinking $7 an hour pulling pork at Sonny's didn't sound so bad!

During this time I met another BBQ guy though my spouse and we found we had a lot in common. He was working as a contractor, but was well-known for a big annual pig roast he held. So many people kept asking him to cook for their own parties he decided to start up a catering biz on the side: built out a commercial kitchen in his basement, got the license and HD inspection, etc. When he was overbooked I would help him out with grilling gigs and such. We started cooking a few BBQ contests together and doing a little event vending. Fast forward another ten years...

My friend and his wife now are running their second restaurant where they work seven days a week and have about 20 people on the payroll. The stress is incredible - my friend has had a couple heart attacks but thankfully survives (due mostly to his own stubbornness, I think). During the years I have had many occasions to lend a hand with their business, either by working or injecting money when cash flow didn't quite make ends meet. I run the competition team now (he had to quit after the second cardiac episode) and the restaurant stands on it's own two feet financially. I am proud to have been able to help my friend, but also very grateful for being able to vicariously experience owning a restaurant and through this discovering that it is not something I ever need to do for myself. A 50 year old fat man with a bum leg makes a lousy line cook, and working 100 hours in a week to earn what I can make in a day doing my IT job is a poor financial move. I will forever owe my friend for allowing me to see the reality of the food service business from a top-down perspective, which is very different from my previous view as a 16 year old line cook at McDonalds. All that said, my friend HAS been able to make the leap to successful restaurateur, though it has taken him fifteen years and nearly killed him at least twice.

So... what is my takeaway from this story? Pretty much the basics you'll hear from a lot of others:

1) Don't give up your current source of income to go in the food service business. Work both jobs if you must, but hold on to your reliable paycheck!

2) Don't borrow money. If you can't afford equipment, do without, rent, borrow, whatever. Recruit investors if you have to. The last place you want to be is facing a fat loan payoff with no way to pay it.

3) Go slow and keep your overhead low. 75% of all restaurants fail in the first year, so there is plenty of good used equipment out there for pennies on the dollar. Never buy new equipment. Don't hire people to watch them stand around - send them home when it's a dead shift! Don't commit to advertising, security, suppliers or any other monthly contract that you will be bound to pay for in the future when you may not have the money that month.

4) Embrace your community! You will be amazed how rarely all those friends and family who kept telling you how great your food was when it was free show up at your new place to pay for dinner. Go to every Chamber, United Way, DDA, Rotary, Charity Auction, etc. etc. gathering you can. Yes, they will hit you up for freebies, but only by priming this pump can you build loyalty with the movers and shakers in your community to drop your name when somebody asks about caterers. Let them know you are willing to help, but don't become the doormat for free food for every fundraiser either. This investment is much better than advertising and will pay good dividends, but it will take time - after all 75% of the other restaurant guys that came along before you were just a flash in the pan, so it will take a while to build trust. And of course, make every customer that walks through your door feel like this is "his" place. A few super-fans with Facebook accounts can put you on the map, conversely a couple grouchy reviewers on Yelp can dry up your profits.


In conclusion, for myself, I chose to maintain BBQ as something I did because I enjoyed it. I could see where a few years of doing it because I had to in order to pay the bills was going to take the joy out of the thing for me. My friend and his wife took the other path, and they have made it work only because they put everything they have into it every single day of their lives - 100% of their heart & soul, money & time. It's an intensely personal decision, just make sure you go into it with your eyes open and reasonable expectations.

Best of Luck!

-GF


Gowan Fenley
Cartersville, GA

BigBellyBBQ
12-23-2013, 02:34 AM
good luck with whatever you choose and path to take. The cookers I use for comercial are Sothern Pride 700 & 500 . Old HIckory is also extre,mly good. Fill fire box full of wood turn on and check in 8 or 10 hours..

SkinEz
12-23-2013, 04:09 PM
So I go talk to the health department, and I feel pretty good about it. We talked about all the different types of options, and he wants me to lay out a plan for each of the options. I am pretty sure my church will let me use their kitchen in the event I need a commercial kitchen. However, I am really leaning towards looking seriously into a trailer with everything in it I need. In the case I do not have to depend on my church. As long as I have refrigeration, hand washing sink, and a three sink set up, he said everything else is academic. I am going to draw up some different ideas about trailers, and look for some used trailers already out there. I have been keeping my eye on some that are on a used concession website that may fit my needs. My only concern is storage. Does anyone have a layout for a trailer to use more for concession/ catering. I have seen tons of set ups for competition rigs, but they do not have sufficient storage.

Thanks

Merry Christmas..

skywalker
12-30-2013, 07:21 PM
Lots of wise counseling info here. Considering same direction as Skinez.Was thinking about trailer with smoker on the back porch.Smaller investment than brick & mortar with portability and onsite catering options.

SkinEz
12-30-2013, 07:32 PM
Heres a new question that has recently entered into my.options. If I have a transportable trailer with refrigeration, and need it running from point a to point b, whats a good way to do that? A food truck can run off of engine, but what about a trailer. I am no way an electrician, and really have no idea. I plan on a generator on site, but im concerned with HD saying something without option to keep refrigerators running in transport.

HBMTN
12-30-2013, 07:39 PM
The only way that I know of is to have a generator running it.

SkinEz
12-30-2013, 07:41 PM
The only way that I know of is to have a generator running it.

Can you do that, and run down the road?

Pyle's BBQ
12-30-2013, 08:25 PM
I don't see why you can't have your generator running while going down the road. What are your concerns about doing this?

SkinEz
12-30-2013, 08:33 PM
I don't see why you can't have your generator running while going down the road. What are your concerns about doing this?

Dont really have concerns other than legallity. Me and the HD guy im talking with talked about that briefly. His answer was that is not his lane. I appreciated his honesty, but I dont want to run into silly SNAFUs like im reading on other threads. Was just seeing if anyone had any experience with this type of thing.

skywalker
12-31-2013, 06:30 PM
"Not his lane" from HD guy sounds strangely familiar to" don't ask don't tell". :wink: But i guess as long as you're at proper temp when you unplug fridge to travel and trip is not to long ,you're still ok.But i think running the generator while traveling would probably be the way to go.Most fridges/freezers in an RV will run on 110v household current, 12v battery or propane.You can get larger units that run on propane but you're probably not gonna find a NSF cert on one of those.

Scorcher
12-31-2013, 11:04 PM
Dry ice on bagged ice will keep your temps low for 4 hours or more.
Running with gen operating can present some issues. Carbon monoxcide build up. Exhuast heat build up. I would find another way. Possibly go with a full fledged RV 3 way. Safer.

57borntorun
01-01-2014, 08:53 AM
Maybe you can look into existing established businesses up for sale in your area.As previous stated posts it`s a tough business and maybe someone had grand visions or time for retirement.Might be a shoe-in to get immediate clients depending on their reputation.Starting new endeavors means sometimes taking away business from others or on the catering side under cutting the competitors pricing thus lowering your profits.If you do full catering you should make friends with local rental companies.On a smaller note, should you want to start small and have room in your garage a commercial grade 2-3 door stand up refrigerator can be run when needed for food storage.On larger well paying jobs my brother rents refer. trucks but his rest. is not open for dinner so he has a large staff if necessary.Long days sometimes but he is so well established it`s almost(and I mean to say almost) like clock work.

SkinEz
01-01-2014, 01:15 PM
Dry ice on bagged ice will keep your temps low for 4 hours or more.
Running with gen operating can present some issues. Carbon monoxcide build up. Exhuast heat build up. I would find another way. Possibly go with a full fledged RV 3 way. Safer.

Even if the generator is on outside of trailer?

kurtsara
01-02-2014, 04:16 PM
We leave our generator running on the porch all the time, if we are driving a distance we even tie it down, otherwise, never a problem

Murray in N.Z.
01-02-2014, 04:34 PM
SkinEz. Plenty of large trailers are trucking down the highways with auxiliary chiller units running all the way... all powered by small diesel motors. So long as its well vented it wont be a problem. I would suggest looking at an ONAN ... plenty of cheaper/lighter units around but they will give a lifetime of reliable use. You might even be able to get a cheap unit from a bus/trailer/truck wrecker. One of mates imported a school bus an it had one on board to power the heater fans ... useless for us as we run 240V but it was surprising where these things are.

Muzza .... back in N.Z. now.

Fooskey
01-03-2014, 06:09 PM
We run our Onan going down the road quite a bit. Some events have a short set up window, and having things more or less ready to go is very helpful.

bbqbull
01-03-2014, 07:31 PM
Talking to a guy I know. His boys went out to Wyoming and killed and elk. They had the animal processed. They put it in there chest freezer and had a Honda generator to power the freezer. The trailer sat on an angle just enough to trigger the low oil sensor and shut down. When they got home they had a spoiled elk in there chest freezer.
Just something else to think about.

We had Onan gasoline powered generators on our pumpers and rescue trucks at my former job. We had remote starts in the cab. We would start it a mile down the road for lighting to do our work. Never had a problem with exhaust problems even with the compartment doors closed.

kurtsara
01-04-2014, 09:13 AM
Talking to a guy I know. His boys went out to Wyoming and killed and elk. They had the animal processed. They put it in there chest freezer and had a Honda generator to power the freezer. The trailer sat on an angle just enough to trigger the low oil sensor and shut down. When they got home they had a spoiled elk in there chest freezer.
Just something else to think about.

We had Onan gasoline powered generators on our pumpers and rescue trucks at my former job. We had remote starts in the cab. We would start it a mile down the road for lighting to do our work. Never had a problem with exhaust problems even with the compartment doors closed.

You have to check the generator, especially crossing a few states, we use a swift hitch SH02 wireless camera to watch ours.

SkinEz
01-04-2014, 11:57 AM
Talking to a guy I know. His boys went out to Wyoming and killed and elk. They had the animal processed. They put it in there chest freezer and had a Honda generator to power the freezer. The trailer sat on an angle just enough to trigger the low oil sensor and shut down. When they got home they had a spoiled elk in there chest freezer.
Just something else to think about.


Ugh that would really suck!!!

BigBellyBBQ
01-05-2014, 02:12 AM
I have an Onan running on my trailer if I have fresh in the fridge. The chest freezer will keep for days. I leave a light on that is powered by the generator, in view of my mirrors, so I know if it is stopped..I also pack frozen in the fresh part of fridge so I dont have to run. I only run on hot days or on long trips of over 1 hour. Or if possible just pack the igloo with ice then move to fridge..I try to do this with chicken, because 200 or 400 1/2s get messy. I was thinking of just getting a little Honda to run the fridge only, that draws about 8 to 10 amps...
About the guys that lost the elk meat, I cant beleive they did not check such a treasure when they pulled off at a rest site or fueling up. I am so nervous every stop things are looked at and they must have started off with the meat just loaded into the freezer...I bet that wont happen again..

SkinEz
02-27-2014, 03:51 PM
OK so it has been a while since I last posted here. One, because the semester started, and it got pretty busy. However, to shed some light on my endeavors I have just put a down payment on a Shirley Fabrication Smoker. I have also began looking into a couple of businesses in my area, which assist start-ups. One company is an incubator, and allows me to have an office and access to a conference room and classroom at an affordable rate. Another business I am dealing with is a commercial kitchen in which I am meeting with Monday to go over the possibilities of me renting space. I am a little anxious to get this ball rolling, but am excited to see how it all pans out.