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View Full Version : Comp trailer things to consider


sdbbq1234
10-25-2013, 06:08 PM
We are in the market for a competition type trailer. Aside from having the luxury of a porch unit, this post is requesting items that the basic trailer should have, or that we should/would consider.

Things like: Flooring - what type material, what thickness, undercoating? Framing - what type material, spacing of the "studs", floor studs/framing?

I don't know squat about this stuff, so, nothing is too basic for me.

I am looking for a basic built unit, basic inside wall covering, etc.. Due to the fact I am not rich :sad: , I would like to finish the inside wiring, walls, lights, plumbing, etc..., myself.

I know there were some threads about this, so if anyone can recall those links as well, that would be great.

Thanks.

wallace

Ron_L
10-25-2013, 06:20 PM
Our old trailer had rubber coin flooring in it. It gives some padding, good traction if it gets wet, and is very easy to clean.

http://www.rubbercal.com/files/CoinGripBlack-rc400.jpg

Otherwise, make sure that you have enough head room after the ceiling is finished. Our old trailer was 6'6" inside and after finishing the ceiling and adding lights I barely cleared the lights (I'm 6'2")

Shiz-Nit
10-25-2013, 07:04 PM
I would make sure it was able to carry more weight than what you have now incase you want to grow... Heavy duty axels with good trailer brakes then add a break box in your truck.... Also a bull dog hitch.
I am working on a build myself and these were on top of my list.

sdbbq1234
10-25-2013, 07:07 PM
I would make sure it was able to carry more weight than what you have now incase you want to grow... Heavy duty axels with good trailer brakes then add a break box in your truck.... Also a bull dog hitch.
I am working on a build myself and these were on top of my list.

Thanks. Probably a dumb question, but what is a bull dog hitch?

Thanks!

wallace

Ron_L
10-25-2013, 07:10 PM
http://www.northerntool.com/images/product/images/12481_lg.jpg

Cayman1
10-25-2013, 08:08 PM
To save weight, we did the floors with a bedliner product called Herculiner. Goes on with a roller. Cost was about $300. Factory wanted $900. Similar to Rhino Liner.Think about insulating walls and ceiling. Nothing hotter or colder than a big tin box.

Shiz-Nit
10-25-2013, 08:32 PM
Thanks. Probably a dumb question, but what is a bull dog hitch?

Thanks!

wallace

This... http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0y5CLIE6cN4
Also a lock is made to go in place of the pin which intern makes it harder for thieves to cut the lock and make off with your equipment... Many a smokers and trailers have been stolen when on the road traveling to wake up heart broken.
Also the safety of the hitch it insures me my trailer will not pass me while driving down the road.

bmikiten
10-26-2013, 09:24 AM
Check with your local health department and see what they allow as well. Even if you don't do the food truck thing with your trailer, future owners might and you don't want to put in a flooring that isn't going to be acceptable. Some rubberized floorings aren't allowed here.

Ron_L
10-26-2013, 10:22 AM
We had a couple of windows that slid open and had screens plus an RV-type door with a screen door added to ours. It really helped keep it cool on hot days.

sdbbq1234
10-27-2013, 04:15 PM
Thanks for the tips and info.

Is thee a standard floor type used (plywood, particle board, marine plywood, etc...)?

Also, is there a standard thickness to the flooring?

Thanks.

wallace

Gowan
10-27-2013, 08:42 PM
When choosing a cargo trailer, make sure it has Dexter axles. The cheap ones use Chinese units that will cost you plenty to replace when they go bendy.

Smoke'n Ice
10-27-2013, 09:17 PM
Consider what you will be pulling it with and how much gas milage you are willing to lose. Every pound on the trailer translates into gas usage. I know that creature comforts are not a high consideration but, if your other half goes, then bathroom, shower and ac are a way to get her more enthuseastic about the project and the money expended. Use FRP for the walls and ceiling as they are hd acceptable. Shop for the thinner sheets of FRP because of weight. Use lots of insulation, blue sheets from Home Depot are the right thickeness for the wall struts, between the tin and inner walls. Watch your final weight as you add things, even the floor needs to be weighted prior to installation. There are trade offs for things if you approach the max weight of the trailer. Have fun with your project.

rksylves
10-28-2013, 07:52 AM
I would very highly recommend that you purchase the NFPA 1192 and read it extremely carefully. It spells out all the standards that should be followed for trailer wiring, plumbing, LP gas, etc.

Russ

Cayman1
10-28-2013, 10:47 AM
We chose plywood walls so that we could attach stuff easier than with frp. With frp you have to find a strut for mounting an item. Our ceiling is frp. We went with the wire closet shelves to save weight. It is a trade off, comfort and convenience or weight.

Our work tables are now down the left side rather than in front.

This is a 7x14 with v front. Like your house, you will expand to fill the space.:mrgreen:

Smoke'n Ice
10-28-2013, 08:40 PM
Looking at the picture, I calculate an additional 500-750 pounds of axle weight. Goes to previous post about weight and gas milage.:shock:

roksmith
10-29-2013, 01:00 PM
Anybody have any input on a v-nose? I would have thought it helped a little, but I've heard differing opinions.

cpw
10-29-2013, 01:55 PM
Anybody have any input on a v-nose? I would have thought it helped a little, but I've heard differing opinions.

Don't have any actual experience with a V nose, but it can only help with gas mileage. The best use of a V nose that I've seen is someone on here who had a trailer built, they added a small door in the V outside, and then built a wall inside to close off the V. It became a handy little storage closet.

Gowan
10-29-2013, 02:13 PM
I have a V-nose. Cuts thru the wind better, but unless you get an extended tongue or drawbar you have to be careful when backing. With my trailer the corner of the Ram 2500 bumper hits and dents the sheet metal on the V when fully jack-knifed.

Still, the extra space and streamlining you get for the cost make it a good value.

bmikiten
10-29-2013, 03:05 PM
I just purchased one and it is a bit simpler to pull as the nose helps the the trailer cut through the wind and it does cut down the noise as well. I don't know that backing up has been a real issue beyond that of a typical trailer. You do lose a bit of front-end space but I didn't find it to be a big deal. I have two propane tanks mounted on the V which keeps them out of the inside where I wouldn't want them anyway. Many people also put an extended housing for a generator on the other side which also helps to keep gas, fumes and noise away from the trailer interior.