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Muzzlebrake
07-02-2013, 12:30 PM
This just popped up in another thread and I think it's an interesting topic.

Somewhere along the line, I heard someone say something to the effect they prefer a larger cut of meat as it more than likely comes from an older animal that has had more time to develop flavorful meat.

I don't have enough data to make up my mind one way or another.

What do you think? Does larger size=older animal=more flavor. What does age (when alive, not talking about wet/dry aging ) have to do with tenderness?

PapaBearsHickoryPit
07-02-2013, 01:06 PM
I would think a smaller cut in brisket would in theory equate to a more tender cut. Less age, less movement of the muscle=more tender meat. Think veal. On the other hand the flavor might lack some character vs. a larger cut which I would presume came from an older, larger cow.

smokeisgood
07-02-2013, 01:20 PM
I tended to think deer...as in old buck with huge antlers= not so good meat as opposed to younger, less mature deer with better meat. Never thought about the fat having time to develop more flavor. I would think there has to be an age where the tendernous stops dropping off

Hawg Father of Seoul
07-02-2013, 02:06 PM
Two things. First, if you want a tender cut, buy tenderloin. If you want a tender brisket, cook it tender.

Second, the best venison I have ever had came from a one horned deer, more grey than brown, ran by dogs, and shot 5 times by rednecks. So conventional wisdom is not always right.

landarc
07-02-2013, 02:31 PM
Beef is not Venison, and a lot has to do with minor age differences, unless we are talking grass-finished animals.

Most all beef, not veal, comes from animals that are a lot younger than most of use realize. When talking about cattle from most commodity sources, you are looking at 24 to 30 months of life. And they tend to be chosen and brought to slaughter by weight and not age. The exception, is times like this, when feed is so expensive, then you start to see smaller cattle being brought to market. Still, in most cases, we are talking a short time period.

Time in pasture, time on grain, types of grain or formula, level of stress at slaughter, condition of critter are all more important and almost impossible to know for most of us.

Bentley
07-02-2013, 03:01 PM
Was this due to not enough deer to go around for all rednecks, or said rednecks were bad shots? Was any Budweiser involved?

...and shot 5 times by rednecks....

Hawg Father of Seoul
07-02-2013, 03:51 PM
Was this due to not enough deer to go around for all rednecks, or said rednecks were bad shots? Was any Budweiser involved?

Yes on all accounts. I was the sober one that drove up on this craziness. Worth noting that I first saw the deer on it's way to "town" (population 200ish) in the bed of the truck. The next time I saw the deer was at the cabin two or so hours later.

Side note: If you have never seen deer being hunted by running dogs and there is a place where this is still legal (it is not here now), buy a bullet proof vest and join in. Hard to believe, but this may be the most dangerous redneck game of them all. (Imagine 10-20 guys with guns spread out trying to shoot a deer that is running away from several dogs)

PapaBearsHickoryPit
07-02-2013, 03:58 PM
There is a huge difference between grain fed and grass fed.

Butcher BBQ
07-02-2013, 08:32 PM
Bigger doesn't necessarily mean older, but more than likely it will be. What you have to do is get to know the plant or the even the way they grow the beef or pigs. You said you were thinking it could affect tenderness and flavor. Other than the feed the animal eats the last 30 days, the stress it goes thru prior to killing is the most important thing for determining tenderness. There is chapter in books that have been written that cover this topic. Just do some searches and some research.

CBQ
07-03-2013, 12:45 AM
As always, trust your Butcher. The thread here on 'dark cutters' is an interesting read.

nucornhusker
07-03-2013, 12:54 AM
Bigger doesn't necessarily mean older, but more than likely it will be. What you have to do is get to know the plant or the even the way they grow the beef or pigs. You said you were thinking it could affect tenderness and flavor. Other than the feed the animal eats the last 30 days, the stress it goes thru prior to killing is the most important thing for determining tenderness. There is chapter in books that have been written that cover this topic. Just do some searches and some research.I doubt we could get a better answer than this.

Thanks, David.

TailGateJoecom
07-03-2013, 01:02 AM
This just popped up in another thread and I think it's an interesting topic.

Somewhere along the line, I heard someone say something to the effect they prefer a larger cut of meat as it more than likely comes from an older animal that has had more time to develop flavorful meat.

I don't have enough data to make up my mind one way or another.

What do you think? Does larger size=older animal=more flavor. What does age (when alive, not talking about wet/dry aging ) have to do with tenderness?


I prefer 24-27 years old, just as the scent of babypowder is wearing off.....oh wait, we are talking about brisket????

Balls Casten
07-03-2013, 10:24 AM
Bigger doesn't necessarily mean older, but more than likely it will be. What you have to do is get to know the plant or the even the way they grow the beef or pigs. You said you were thinking it could affect tenderness and flavor. Other than the feed the animal eats the last 30 days, the stress it goes thru prior to killing is the most important thing for determining tenderness. There is chapter in books that have been written that cover this topic. Just do some searches and some research.

Happy cows give more milk ... they do. :-)