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View Full Version : $$$ Per LB....Served Hot Off The Pit VS Vac Sealed(Heat&Eat)


Q-Dat
06-11-2013, 07:21 PM
I have a number of friends who want me to start selling them BBQ. I'm gonna start out small for now. For the most part I will be unable to distribute the meat to my friends on the day of the cook. The plan is to vac seal the finished product at its optimal freshness and then bring it to them later.

My question is this. Do you think the fact that they will have to reheat the meat themselves vs getting it in a foil pan hot and ready to eat should lower my asking price much?

Please. Food safety and legality are not an issue here. I am only asking a pricing question.

Thanks in advance for all advice.

mikeleonard81
06-11-2013, 11:46 PM
I don't think it should affect the price. If it did it should be more per pound since vac packing is more labor on your part. If it is re-heated in warm water nothing will be lost flavor wise.

gator320
06-12-2013, 11:45 AM
I sell bbq vac sealed frozen by the pound same price. I do how ever give them a printed sheet regarding reheating instructions. I found the initial start up selling packaged bbq was expensive regarding the equipment needed that will cut your processing time down.

KnucklHed BBQ
06-12-2013, 03:33 PM
I wouldn't sell it for any less just cuz it's packaged - IMO most BBQ is better reheated anyways if done properly

Q-Dat
06-12-2013, 10:32 PM
Thanks for chiming in folks. I don't think I will let it affect my price.

I guess if you think about it, whatever value might be lost by it not being ready to eat as is, is made up for by the convenience of being able to use it when they are ready to.

bruno994
06-19-2013, 07:57 AM
Did you come up with a projected price per pound on the brisket and pulled pork? This is pretty much the same idea I am having and have been comtemplating for awhile. To me brisket and pork only gets better after being vac sealed in it's own juices.

kenthanson
06-19-2013, 11:01 PM
I sell bbq vac sealed frozen by the pound same price. I do how ever give them a printed sheet regarding reheating instructions. I found the initial start up selling packaged bbq was expensive regarding the equipment needed that will cut your processing time down.

I was wondering if you wouldn't mind sharing your re-heating instructions. My comp team is selling pre-packaged PP as a fund raiser for the season but unsure about describing the reheating procedure. Of course if that is proprietary information and you choose to not share it that is completely acceptable as well.

gator320
06-20-2013, 10:03 AM
Pulled Pork:

1. Let thaw 6-12 hours in fridge
2. Place sealed bag in simmering water
1 pound bag 15-20 minutes
2 pound bag 20-30 minutes
3. To reheat on grill: open package place pulled pork in foil pan or other grill safe container, sealed with tin foil, and reheat over medium grill for 30 minutes

It's simple and straight forward

kenthanson
06-20-2013, 06:33 PM
Thanks brother!!!!

dosvans
06-25-2013, 12:39 PM
Thanks for chiming in folks. I don't think I will let it affect my price.

I guess if you think about it, whatever value might be lost by it not being ready to eat as is, is made up for by the convenience of being able to use it when they are ready to.

We just started selling our BBQ vac sealed in 1LB batches. If you don't mind me asking, what are your charging for your BBQ? We are charging $10 per LB for Pork, $15 Per LB for Brisket, and $20 per rack of ribs.

bproffer
06-25-2013, 12:53 PM
We just started selling our BBQ vac sealed in 1LB batches. If you don't mind me asking, what are your charging for your BBQ? We are charging $10 per LB for Pork, $15 Per LB for Brisket, and $20 per rack of ribs.


This is the same price I have been getting for mine. We started off with pulled pork and now do brisket and ribs. I have alot of happy folks with pulled pork in their freezers. We sold over 300 lbs for the superbowl. :grin:

My reheat instructions are similar to what was posted above. Except for if re-heating from frozen, I up the time to 45-55 min in the simmering water.

landarc
06-25-2013, 12:57 PM
My gawds, the food safety, you'll kill someone with your illegal BBQ, man, I just don't know anymore! :blah:

If you are delivering hot and ready to eat, the traditional thing is that it costs a bit more, this is largely due to the perception that you provided more of a service in cooking to order. However, the best way to do this, as always, is to price your product out, include all costs and charge for profit (which, I assume you want to make a little on this). Normally, for a BBQ place, you would look to 3x cost, for a full service place, 4x cost. Since you are doing cold delivery, pre-packaged and there is no service, I think you have to look at 2x to 2.5x costs for a price.

Out of curiosity, what are the local 'competitors' charging? Even if your food is significantly better, you are not going to be able to exceed their cost per pound. You will need to consider comparable market values. Do not just match them, but, consider that you will need to justify costs if yours are higher.

gotribe28
07-04-2013, 02:51 PM
what would be the reheat times for brisket?

gotribe28
07-04-2013, 02:52 PM
and would i slice before vacum packing? or leave in big chunks