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Jeff_in_KC
02-18-2006, 08:19 PM
I attended a competition BBQ class today that ran all day. It is one listed on the KCBS site by Bob Snelson. The guy knows his stuff as he used to compete and among other awards, won pork at the AR a few years ago. The thing of it is, it was a class geared towards folks who hadn't Qed much before. I did learn 3 or 4 tricks and methods but to be honest I have learned more from you guys and at times, I felt like I had as much to offer. The class was pretty small... one guy who never had done a BBQ contest before who plans on cooking at a contest Jay, Wayne and I will be at and a team of four MIM cooks from Alabama. Danged nice guys those Southerners so I invited them to check out the Brethren. Bob does have a fun class though and I recommend it as he'll tel you the truth on anything you aks plus if you have trouble in Qing, you can call him and he'll walk you through any issue you have. Glad I took the course.

MilitantSquatter
02-18-2006, 08:39 PM
Jeff - Glad you enjoyed it and got some helpful tips. Was this a BBQ cooking class or a competition BBQ class ? You mentioned it was geared toward beginning cooks but referred to it as competition class.... I'm guessing it was not specifically for competition.

Two questions I'm curious to know if they were discussed

1) Did Bob Snelson happen to provide you with his opinion of a team needing to cook differently in competition as opposed to ones backyard (ex. the WOW factor that is frequently discussed here).

2) Does he recommend rubbing in the rub or just sprinkling it on....that was a debate we had here a few weeks ago...just curious as to his opinion if discussed

Jeff_in_KC
02-18-2006, 09:10 PM
Hey Vinny...

Yes, it was specifically geared towards competition BBQ. Sorry if I misrepresented at all. When I said beginning cooks, I meant beginning competition cooks. Not that I'm not still that but this class was really the basics.

To answer your questions, first, it was made pretty obvious that you need to cook differently than you do in your backyard. He mentioned the differences in how you would normally cook and what KCBS teaches it's judges to look for, the same thing from our CBJ class a few weeks ago. For flavors, you're looking for deal arse MIDDLE of the road and avoid extremes in heat or sweetness (not new to me). He also stressed that while overcooking meat to fall apart tenderness at home is good and liked by most people, that doesn't fly at contests (again, not a new concept to me). I think me mainly reinforced a lot of stuff.

I did ask about rubbing vs. Sprinkling rubs and he shrugged it off as not making a difference either way. Don't know as I agree with him as there are a few guys here who would beg to differ with him who may have done the homework while it might not have ever occured to Bob. Not sure.

One thing I took note of... he said that good KC style BBQ can be in the money in places where real BBQ is non-existent because the average non-certified judge thinks some of the places they know locally are great and something that's pretty decent representation of KC style will "wow" the heck out of them.

Jeff - Glad you enjoyed it and got some helpful tips. Was this a BBQ cooking class or a competition BBQ class ? You mentioned it was geared toward beginning cooks but referred to it as competition class.... I'm guessing it was not specifically for competition.

Two questions I'm curious to know if they were discussed

1) Did Bob Snelson happen to provide you with his opinion of a team needing to cook differently in competition as opposed to ones backyard (ex. the WOW factor that is frequently discussed here).

2) Does he recommend rubbing in the rub or just sprinkling it on....

Sawdustguy
02-19-2006, 12:56 AM
Vinny,

I am interested in Q classes also so I traded emails with Stephanie Wilson of The Slabs (Tom and Joshes Orgasmic Slabs). They have been on a winning tear in the past few years so I am sure you know who they are. For $100/person plus transportation and lodging they would do a one day class in early August if we wanted. Maybe we should speak to Poobah to see if we could get a class together. They teach you how to q Kyle Style (Kyle Laval). I bet Jeff has met Kyle Laval once or twice. I know there are 3 of my team who would sign up for it.

backyardchef
02-19-2006, 07:27 AM
Vinny,

I am interested in Q classes also so I traded emails with Stephanie Wilson of The Slabs (Tom and Joshes Orgasmic Slabs). They have been on a winning tear in the past few years so I am sure you know who they are. For $100/person plus transportation and lodging they would do a one day class in early August if we wanted. Maybe we should speak to Poobah to see if we could get a class together. They teach you how to q Kyle Style (Kyle Laval). I bet Jeff has met Kyle Laval once or twice. I know there are 3 of my team who would sign up for it.

Guy, you can count me in for something like that. Let me know if you want any help putting it together. Cool idea.

--Matt

Solidkick
02-19-2006, 08:19 AM
Vinny,

I am interested in Q classes also so I traded emails with Stephanie Wilson of The Slabs (Tom and Joshes Orgasmic Slabs). They have been on a winning tear in the past few years so I am sure you know who they are. For $100/person plus transportation and lodging they would do a one day class in early August if we wanted. Maybe we should speak to Poobah to see if we could get a class together. They teach you how to q Kyle Style (Kyle Laval). I bet Jeff has met Kyle Laval once or twice. I know there are 3 of my team who would sign up for it.

I really hope you guys can pull this off. Steph and Kyle are great people and are great examples of the way Q technique is done in the midwest. These are the people I was talking about in a thread about a year ago that has their whole presentation and turn in routine choreographed to a music CD, they know what they need to be doing by what song is playing.

Best of luck with this!

MilitantSquatter
02-19-2006, 08:34 AM
I just went to their website... www.theslabs.com (http://www.theslabs.com) It mentions their is no cooking involved in the class... I'm assuming they cook and demonstrate, but no one else does. Is this the standard protocol for these types of classes ?

It sounds like it could be fun and they're definitely an established team. I'd definitely consider it.

However, I'm not 100% certain that any class is worth the cost based on Jeff's feedback of only learing 3-4 tricks. For $100+, I'd probably rather spend the money on more meat, a few new rubs/sauces etc. and experiment on my own with techniques we share here and have not tried yet.

Does anyone else have any feedback on classes they've taken ? Has anyone found themselves listening to techniques that they've tried previously and did not like or have success with ?

Yakfishingfool
02-19-2006, 08:50 AM
I'd even make the trip ti LI to attend a class. scott

chad
02-19-2006, 12:30 PM
I took a weekend class with Myron Mixon (Jack's Old South) last year. Started on Friday evening with talk and dinner and then we split up for the night. We met up on Saturday morning and had breakfast together...then started "chalk talk" and recipes. The timing was setup to resemble a "normal" two day FBA or KCBS event so about 11a.m. we pretended that we'd arrived at the site and gotten set up...we started meat prep shortly after lunch...we did all four meats and did the injections, trimming, rubs, etc. and bedded everything down. We did more talk about recipes, timing, woods, and anything else you could think of. Myron, David, James Britt, and Buster answered any and all questions asked.

We broke up about 7 p.m. with orderst to be at the site (we were at a state park and some were camping, like me, and others had "cabins") at 3 a.m. (Sunday morning) when we lit off the fires (we used Myron's "Hunley" tank cooker, a new rig with the Jack's Old South Signature cooker, a Jedmaster, and a Jack's Old South rib cooker) and loaded the brisket and pork (I think we did about 6 or so brisket and about 8 butts). We then finished prepping the chicken and ribs...we talked about timing, temps, woods, finishing, etc. The ribs and chicken went on later in the morning...we were shooting for 11 a.m., 12 p.m., and 1 and 2 p.m. turning times.

Overall we did a couple of hundred pounds of meat...fed us, the park staff, and still had lots to take home if we wished.

I asked Myron the other day if he was doing a whole hog class...he said from now on all his classes including the FBA/KCBS format classes will include whole hog since he's getting so many requests for it.

Needless to say, it wasn't $100 a head! I paid $500 for my weekend but got a TON of information and was well fed, too.

rbsnwngs
02-19-2006, 01:38 PM
i would be very interested in attending a class like that. I heard Paul Kirk charges $250-$300 for a one day class like that.

BBQchef33
02-19-2006, 02:13 PM
I have been and still am working on setting up a class during the summer. I have been in touch with a few big names chefs and will have more info for you guys as the season gets closer.

Jeff_in_KC
02-19-2006, 04:04 PM
I will second what Mr. Kick says about the Slabs. Steph and Kyle know their chit BIG time and they've become somewhat of a legend in the midwest. Anytime you can learn from them, you're at an advantage. And yes, Guy, I've met Kyle. Funny dude! His story about his first contest ever being a rain soaked mess right here in Pleasant Hill is funny! Even the headaches that a rainy contest bring didn't dampen his enthusiasm (no pun intended) and he was hooked on the sport.

One difference in Bob's class and what you might or might not learn with the Slabs... Bob doesn't compete anymore (well, he will usually do one a year, mainly to vend but he'll tell you anything and everything. I'd just remember that anyone who is still competing will probably not tell you ALL their secrets.

Solidkick
02-19-2006, 07:41 PM
i would be very interested in attending a class like that. I heard Paul Kirk charges $250-$300 for a one day class like that.
y
Yes, you are correct....you bring your cooker and learn the prep and actually cook, the class is about 12 hours I believe. I understand Millitant's concern, I took it that he'd rather be cooking, and I respect that.....personally, if I had a choice, I'd choose the Slabs class. I have a chance on Kirks class in a couple of months and I'm passing...the amount I'd spend on that class is an entry fee to a contest plus meat....I actually feel some guilt as it is my local group and friends that are hosting this.......:cry:

HoDeDo
02-19-2006, 08:06 PM
My wife tried to get me PK's class for 10 when I turned 30 - It ends in enough food to feed 25, and you serve up a block party. You get BBQ tricks, he walks you through making various rubs, and flavors to use. It was full day cook - from how to trim your whole briskets right, rub your ribs, etc. full presentation skills. Looked to be a good class, but never got it scheduled - so she gave up.

I think Dr.BBQ would be a great class to attend, if he would do a group one... I agree on the slabs - great folks, and great que. Learn all you can!!!

Sawdustguy
02-19-2006, 08:25 PM
Thank you Phil. I look forward it.