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View Full Version : Competition Ribs- Cutting Them


gapabral
03-24-2013, 11:46 AM
If you are cooking multiple slabs at a contest, how important is it that the ribs line up evenly when placed in the box. I was just watching one of Bill Anderson's(Chatham Artillery) and he was cutting them so there was meat on both sides of the bone(Hollywood Cut?). However, there is no way they would line up evenly in the box although they looked like great ribs.

If you are getting 2 ribs from each slab and turning in 6 to 8 bones, regardless of how you cut them, I would think it would be difficult to have them lined up evenly.

It is quite obvious I don't know what is important or I would score higher in ribs:wink:

thank you

Ron_L
03-24-2013, 12:14 PM
Everyone has their own methods, but I don't do hollywood cut, and when I put ribs next to each other in the box they come from the same rack, so if I am putting 6 bones across they are all from the same rack.

Porky
03-24-2013, 12:22 PM
From a judges standpoint, seeing a box that has ribs that are evenly cut is impressive. It shows that you are making a statement with your presentation. Keep in mind that this not the only criteria that is considered.

smokeisgood
03-24-2013, 12:56 PM
Is cutting right alongside the bone and having all the meat on one side frowned upon by judges, and is it better to have meat on both sides? Seems like it would be less likely to fall off it you go over a little...

nucornhusker
03-24-2013, 01:02 PM
I think it would be more likely for the meat to fall off since there is nothing holding it on the other side. Then it would all just slide right off.

Some judges eat from the top not the side, so you get all of the good meat there and get to see how well the meat pulls from the bone.

TheJackal
03-24-2013, 06:00 PM
Smokeisgood, these are cut along one side. Not sure how the one in the middle was cut opposite from the rest. (The things you notice when looking at the pics after turn-ins.) The was 7th place at Hudson Valley Ribfest. We made the decision to make them look like 7 distinct bones instead of trying to 'match them up' or place them together. In 5 years we have only received 2 comment cards. This was one of them. It was a positive comment that praised our unigue presentation.

https://sphotos-a.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ash4/230489_185379801512486_5308755_n.jpg

Ford
03-24-2013, 06:19 PM
If you can't get 3 pieces using Hollywood cut then you have a problem. That should be one layer across. Use 2 slabs and you have 6 for kcbs. With 8 in FBA it requires 3 good slabs. It should all line up good if you trim right.

Lake Dogs
03-24-2013, 07:49 PM
Sure good to see you 'round, Ford.

tnjimbob
03-24-2013, 09:06 PM
We always try to cut right between the bones, so they are equal on both sides of the bone. Symmetrical bones always look better when I arrange the turn in box.

Southern Home Boy
03-25-2013, 09:56 AM
As a KCBS CBJ I will tell you what I look for (I can't speak for anyone else though).

First, let me remind you that presentation is only one part of the score. It is also the lightest weighted part of your score. So if you are going to focus on anything, focus on flavor (taste) first, perfect texture (the meat should bite through easily and pull away from the bone in the bite area ONLY cleanly) second and THEN worry about your appearance scores.

Now... with that said, I score appearance higher on boxes that have as many bones as possible from the same rack. Therefore, hollywood cuts do nothing to improve that score. I'm right-handed, so I naturally grab the "handle" ( that part of the rib rib that has pulled away from the bone) with my right hand. I bite from the side for a couple of reasons: I want to see if the meat pulls off anywhere but my bite; I want to see how cleanly the meat pulls away from the bone and I want to see how quickly the bone dries after the bite. So, with the "handle" on the right, I like the meatiest part of the rib facing me.

But like I said, that's just me.

Hawg Father of Seoul
03-25-2013, 10:39 AM
.... I want to see how quickly the bone dries after the bite.


You are just the person who mentioned this today and nothing personal as I know it did not originate with you, and I have heard this multiple times.

My question is what does bone drying have to do with taste or tenderness? It can't be appearance because it was INSIDE the presentation.

Southern Home Boy
03-25-2013, 11:04 AM
You are just the person who mentioned this today and nothing personal as I know it did not originate with you, and I have heard this multiple times.

My question is what does bone drying have to do with taste or tenderness? It can't be appearance because it was INSIDE the presentation.

When a rib is fully and properly cooked, the bone will dry very quickly and will have a hard, opaque (almost "bleached") appearance within seconds of the bite.

It doesn't apply "directly" to tenderness, but it is a secondary indicator of proper cooking temperatures. I use it more for validation of my initial impression and overall "mouth feel".

Hawg Father of Seoul
03-25-2013, 11:38 AM
Kind of like a CSI to see how good the cook (not the product) is?

We must agree to disagree about this, or at least for my part. Thanks for the honest answer.

rweller
03-25-2013, 11:51 AM
Kind of like a CSI to see how good the cook (not the product) is?

We must agree to disagree about this, or at least for my part. Thanks for the honest answer.

At every KCBS contest the judges have to listen to a recording. It is kind of a refresher coures of what to look for as your judging. On this recording they go over all 4 meat catagories. When it gets to ribs one of the things it says is when you take a bite from the rib it should come off clean and the bone sould dry quickley. This one of the things to look for in a properly cooked rib.
I think this is what Southern Home Boy is referring to. It might not have anything to do with taste but you could use it as a tool for tenderness(clean bite and color of the bone).
I see your point to though.

Hawg Father of Seoul
03-25-2013, 11:59 AM
Cool, I did not know it was coming straight from KCBS. I'll ask them.

I apologize for my ignorance Southern Home Boy.

Jaskew82
03-26-2013, 08:02 AM
I always try to cut as close to dead center on the meat between the bones. I feel it gives the nicest presentation both in the box and when being held.

SlugBug
03-26-2013, 03:39 PM
Dead center between the bones and as many bones as possible from the same rack. I use bones from a maximum of 2 racks. Regards.

Southern Home Boy
03-26-2013, 04:29 PM
Cool, I did not know it was coming straight from KCBS. I'll ask them.

I apologize for my ignorance Southern Home Boy.

S'all good. No apologies necessary.

I think one of the biggest challenges for any organization creating a competition is establishing an agreed upon set of rules for determining who is the winner.

When the competition is over something as individual and subjective as "good food" the challenge to find objective criteria for judging can be quite daunting.

When the "good food" is something as controversial as BBQ, well... it gets almost impossible.

I think the "dry bone" thing is simply one way to help create a consistency among judges in as many areas as possible.