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schmitty28
02-26-2013, 01:43 PM
what type of cutting board is preferred wood, plastic, vinyl,?

deguerre
02-26-2013, 01:48 PM
And WHY? Looking forward to this one.

cpw
02-26-2013, 02:05 PM
Depends on where it's being used. I like wood at the house, but I have a big ole plastic one (18x24) that I bring to comps, because it's thinner. I've been thinking about getting a pack of disposables for comp use though.

Iso
02-26-2013, 02:24 PM
Vending & Comp: Disposable.
At home: plastic - easy to clean

schmitty28
02-26-2013, 02:27 PM
why? food safety, wear and tear,

Pyle's BBQ
02-26-2013, 02:35 PM
I use plastic. Just because of the environment it is being used.

timzcardz
02-26-2013, 02:37 PM
I've been thinking about getting a pack of disposables for comp use though.

Stop wasting your time thinking, and just do it. You'll have no regrets.

Heck, I now sometimes use the disposable ones at home too.

maxwell7
02-26-2013, 02:48 PM
everything i read on cutting board saftey ultimately says --WOOD--less bacteria growth , less cut marks , and cleans easily. I also have 3 boards i use . ALL are 30 bucks each from walmart and Paula Dean Acacia wood boards. One is normal 15x15 , the other two are both " Flour" baking boards and thinner ,( approx 15x20 or so) but one is a cutting board for use in spatch-cocking chicken and the like, the other IS a baking board. All Acacia wood ,essentially end-grain , beautiful , and i love them. NO problems thus far , and i'd recommend to anyone. Besides , how many of us can REALLY afford 1,2,and 300 dollar boards?:biggrin1:

Motley Q
02-26-2013, 03:08 PM
Bamboo is it.

Wood boards are 1980's news. Anyone who says wood hasn't used bamboo.

Plastic boards can cut and get very dirty. Anyone who works in a restaurant knows that.

Arlin_MacRae
02-26-2013, 03:19 PM
Home only: I've used all kinds of cutting boards (I even found my wife using a glass one - once...) and I'm a believer in plastic. You can get 'em big as you want and they're easy to store and move around. Yep, they get cut up and I'm sure bacteria can hide in the cuts if you don't clean the boards right. So...clean the board right! I scrub with a dish cloth and soap, rinse, then spray with commercial bleach cleaner. Lean it up against the sink's backsplash and let it air dry. I've had no funky taste, ever, and discolored spots fade away like magic.
For the record I've never tried bamboo. ;)

Mad About Que
02-26-2013, 03:45 PM
I've got 2 wood ones that i used to carry around, one is a 24x20 boos block and the other is a 12x18 block that was made for a family memeber in the 60's. too small to use for BBQ, but looks friggin cool. I've got a couple pf the large plastic ones for comps currently, but have a few packs of various sizes on my "wish list"..

here's a on topic sub question.. has anyone ever used just regular poster board for a disposible cutting board? just a guess that the disposible ones are any more "sanitary" out of the package... was looking at one a while back and it looked/felt like thin posterboard...

thillin
02-26-2013, 04:11 PM
here's a on topic sub question.. has anyone ever used just regular poster board for a disposible cutting board? just a guess that the disposible ones are any more "sanitary" out of the package... was looking at one a while back and it looked/felt like thin posterboard...

I have heard of people using pizza boxes. not sure, but i assume they were the thin ones, not the corrogated cardboard.

landarc
02-26-2013, 04:56 PM
I use Epicurean pressed fiber boards. And I am slowly phasing out all of my other boards.

Bamboo:
very durable, all the benefits of wood, but, easier to take care of and more tightly grained. I do not like them because I feel they are slow boards and that they 'grab' the edge.

Wood:
Unless it is end grain maple, they all wear out and crack. End grain maples is wonderful stuff, but, pricey and heavy.

Plastic:
Easy to care for, easy to sanitize, light, cheap and easy to handle. Bad for knives. Other than glass, there is no board that is worse for you knife edges.

Glass:
Why not just take your knives on and scrape them across the sidewalk?

Epicurean boards are thin and light, they are easily cleaned (dishwasher safe) and sanitized (will work in a commercial steam sanitizer, or bleach), water proof, do not need oiling and will not split or crack. They are not cheap ($35 to $50), but, nowhere as expensive as a quality wood board ($150 to $300). They are a fast cutting surface and do not damage the edge on even the thin edged Japanese carbon knives.

maxwell7
02-26-2013, 04:59 PM
I've had two bamboo boards and liked them. However, both were washed appropriately , dried , oiled , and stored on edge--and cracked. one down the middle , another 2-3 inches in.Granted , they were thinner boards , not expensive , and certainly not 2 or more inches thick , nor end grain. So , I'll stick with my 2 inch or more thick affordable wood boards until I can afford a thick end-grain bamboo.!!:thumb:

HeSmellsLikeSmoke
02-26-2013, 06:55 PM
For what it may be worth to this discussion, Cook's Illustrated recently gave its top rating to an edge grain teak board by ProTeak. It is not as expensive as Boos, but is pricey.

Once I read their recommendation, I started using the back of a Dansk teak carving board that I have been using since 1966. So far I notice little difference from the bamboo boards I have been using for the past two years. Perhaps it will be easier on the knife edge as it seems softer.

I use boards at home only.

Mad About Que
02-27-2013, 07:31 AM
[QUOTE=landarc;2385203]I use Epicurean pressed fiber boards. And I am slowly phasing out all of my other boards.

word of warning from a restaurant guy...don't drop those.. you'll notice quickly how the corners get mucked up. i like them until they start getting dinged up..

Iso
02-27-2013, 11:47 AM
wrt plastic vs wood: Local Health District inspectors don't like wood. Since they have to power to shut me down (costing me money) I prefer to keep them happy. They like the disposable cutting boards.

riblette
02-27-2013, 12:19 PM
Epicurean:
X2 on the pros and cons of the Epicurean boards...I like them a lot because they have all the benes of wood but are a lot lighter and easier to clean. They grip pretty well, you can use both sides (and one side usually has a gutter), and they are easy on the knives without getting cut up. The do bang up pretty easily, but only on the corners, as stated above. They are sold at Bed, Bath, and Beyond…the price isn’t too bad if you use the 20% discount they usually offer.


Disposables:
We've started using disposables in the field...took a long time to bite the bullet but I'm glad we did...expensive but worth it for us since we are a "tent" team as opposed to an "RV" team. It's hard to clean cutting boards in the field and I hate carrying dirty gear home.


As far as I know, there is only one company that makes the disposables (although there are plenty of on-line outlets), which I assume is one of the reasons they are so expensive…if that’s a bad assumption let me now. The prices may vary wildly on the boards themselves but so does the shipping…so if you are considering ordering them make sure you factor in the total cost.

JazzyBadger
02-27-2013, 12:48 PM
http://www.globalindustrial.com/p/foodservice/handling/cutting-boards/sani-tuff-all-rubber-cutting-board-15-x-20-x-1-inch-thickness

That's what I use.

landarc
02-27-2013, 12:53 PM
I do try not to drop anything.

I also understand that in a restaurant, that is a ridiculous statement. But, if you drop a wood board, the same is true. And while plastic is far more durable, it is just not a great surface to cut on. Although I still have two large ones.

schmitty28
02-27-2013, 07:19 PM
going to build an end grain checkerboard one for home and probably use plastic for comps or festivals not sure I like the disposables but never tried them either so was curious what every body else was doing