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IowaWildHogsBbq
02-09-2013, 06:27 PM
Anyone cook berkshire for comps? Does it cook different from regular pork? Is it worth the money?

Outnumbered
02-09-2013, 11:12 PM
Yes. Yes. Yes.

Its great stuff. Not sure it is terribly different than Duroc or other purebred animals, its just what i get from Paradise Meats here locally. The difference is in the gentics. Todays hogs are bred to crank out uniform cuts of pork and fast with little fat. The heritage breeds have more intramuscle fat and better taste as a result.

swamprb
02-10-2013, 12:10 AM
http://i163.photobucket.com/albums/t310/swamprb/IMG_3540.jpg

http://i163.photobucket.com/albums/t310/swamprb/IMG_3533.jpg

We've only used boneless, since that's what out sponsor sells a lot of.

Mammoth Mountain
02-10-2013, 09:26 AM
Swamprb,
Where did you find the pork? The only place I found so far is Snake River.
Thanks

gmholler
02-10-2013, 10:08 PM
For anyone interested in Berkshire pork in LA, here's a local supplier:

http://www.mitchellfamilyfarm.net/

Lynn H.

Capn Kev
02-11-2013, 08:22 AM
http://i163.photobucket.com/albums/t310/swamprb/IMG_3540.jpg

http://i163.photobucket.com/albums/t310/swamprb/IMG_3533.jpg

We've only used boneless, since that's what out sponsor sells a lot of.

Boyden, IA?? Wow! That's where my grandparent's farm was located. Boyden is about 700 people pop. if I remember right. A lot of good hog farms up there.

kenthanson
02-11-2013, 05:49 PM
The farm I get waygu from, last time I was there, the lady told me that next summer they are going to have berkshire, I politely nodded my head like I knew what she was talking about, and now I know.

seanmurphy265
02-11-2013, 07:08 PM
I hardly ever post here, but my Dad and I raised hogs when I was a teenager. The deal with Berkshire hogs is that people are raising them grass fed. They have a house that's climate controlled so they do not root up the ground. Restaurants are paying farms extra to feed them specific fruits and even nuts. They say it improves and gives depth to the flavor. Berkshire hogs can sell for $350.00 -$500.00 each which significantly more than your average hog.

We slaughtered two pigs a year and there is a big difference between what we raised and what you buy in the grocery store. The hogs we killed were pulled aside and fed straight corn. It was some fine eating! I'm not sure that the bread is as important as the feed. You could tell the difference between a hog that was fed straight corn and one that was fed with pellet feed.

Meat Man
02-11-2013, 10:21 PM
We used it and personally I think it's fantastic. It does have a unique flavor and texture. Some of the best Q I've cooked, especially the ribs. But for some reason it did not score consistently.

Outnumbered
02-11-2013, 10:30 PM
Actually, Berkshire does not refer to way it is raised, it is a hog breed that is known for deep red meat and more marbling. Berks may or may not be free range, though typically they are raised that way.

http://www.americanberkshire.com/Consumers/News%20and%20Info/nichepork.html

1. WHAT DO YOU MEAN BY NICHE PORK?

Pork that has certain attributes preferred and valued by some groups of customers. These attributes include: pork raised without antibiotics, growth promotants, or animal by-products in the feed; heirloom breeds such as Berkshire pork (also known as Kurobota pork); organic pork; and locally grown or farm direct pork. These attributes typically require unique production practices, which can limit supply and availability, making them niche products. .

swamprb
02-12-2013, 09:50 AM
I guess I'm just spoiled, I actually prefer the Berkshire cushion meat and CT butts.