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View Full Version : Poor Trimming On Superior Angus Briskets At RD???


Q-Dat
01-30-2013, 05:10 PM
Anyone else have this problem there? I really like the quality of the beef, but whoever is butchering these briskets is doing a terrible job. Seems like about 8 out of 10 have big sections of the fat cap completely missing. Also there seem to be quite a few with very thin flats as well.

Anybody else? Or is it just down here in New Orleans?

Edit: I put this here and not in Q talk because I felt it was a better fit with the competition forum where RD shoppers are more likely to be found due to the KCBS agreement.

fnbish
01-30-2013, 05:18 PM
While I haven't noticed any missing fatcap the flats are always really thin on the superior angus. I've only bought them a couple times.

boogiesnap
01-30-2013, 05:20 PM
While I haven't noticed any missing fatcap the flats are always really thin on the superior angus. I've only bought them a couple times.

i agree with this 100%. i buy their regular choice. takes me quite some time to pick em, but, nature of the beast.

RangerJ
01-30-2013, 05:22 PM
Thin flats are typically not the butchers fault.

As for the fat cap, thats a new one on me. I have not purchased there recently just due to briskets that are not what I'm looking for.

Its the big slice in the middle of the flat that I've learned to look for no matter where I shop.

Q-Dat
01-30-2013, 06:52 PM
Thin flats are typically not the butchers fault.

As for the fat cap, thats a new one on me. I have not purchased there recently just due to briskets that are not what I'm looking for.

Its the big slice in the middle of the flat that I've learned to look for no matter where I shop.

Yeah I don't blame the butcher for the thin flats. Thats entirely up to the animal.

As for the messed up fat caps, I was in there today. They actually had some packers with nice thick flats and linear running grains, but the fat caps were all hacked up so I left brisketless.

Q-Dat
01-30-2013, 06:54 PM
Next time I go I will take some pictures of the missing fat.

MaximumJEFF
01-30-2013, 07:20 PM
I bought one today that looks pretty good. But, there were only two that had thicker flats. I didn't notice anything odd about any of the fat caps

HONCHO GREGORY
01-30-2013, 07:42 PM
Just be careful with your credit card at RD I got 12-13 letters in two weeks sayin they got hacked and my card was one of them. Up here in Western New York. Just sayin

MaximumJEFF
01-30-2013, 07:52 PM
Just be careful with your credit card at RD I got 12-13 letters in two weeks sayin they got hacked and my card was one of them. Up here in Western New York. Just sayin

I hit the ATM before I went :)

tnjimbob
01-31-2013, 07:28 AM
Got a decent looking full packer with a nice fat cap at RD on Sunday, and the flat wasn't too thin. Since I'm not cooking this one for a comp, it won't be a big deal, but I had to look through several to find a decent one that wasn't too thin.

I also took cash just to avoid any problems. That will usually keep me from going overboard @ RD. Too easy to do!

mobow
01-31-2013, 07:41 AM
I remove the fat cap so I would enjoy them being trimmed so I don't pay for something I'm gonna trim and toss. keith

Smoke & Beers
01-31-2013, 09:12 AM
The "butchered" fat cap is most likely a result of an over ambitious person on the final trim line during the slaughter process. If the edges around the trim mark are rounded, it was done on the slaughter floor while the carcass was still warm. If the cut edges are "sharp", it was done after the carcass was chilled.
At the end of the slaughter process, the final trim is where the carcass is trimmed by facility employees, removing any contamination prior to the last USDA inspection before it goes thru the carcass wash and on to the cooler for rapid chilling.
Also note that the brisket area is susceptible to scar tissue and abcesses, especially if the cattle come from an area where there are cactus. The cattle can lay on cactus and get the needles inbedded in their hide in the brisket area which will result in sores and possibly abcesses all which have to be trimmed out.

Q-Dat
01-31-2013, 09:30 AM
The "butchered" fat cap is most likely a result of an over ambitious person on the final trim line during the slaughter process. If the edges around the trim mark are rounded, it was done on the slaughter floor while the carcass was still warm. If the cut edges are "sharp", it was done after the carcass was chilled.
At the end of the slaughter process, the final trim is where the carcass is trimmed by facility employees, removing any contamination prior to the last USDA inspection before it goes thru the carcass wash and on to the cooler for rapid chilling.
Also note that the brisket area is susceptible to scar tissue and abcesses, especially if the cattle come from an area where there are cactus. The cattle can lay on cactus and get the needles inbedded in their hide in the brisket area which will result in sores and possibly abcesses all which have to be trimmed out.

Great information!:thumbup:

Pigs on Fire
01-31-2013, 12:07 PM
You want a dirt-cheap piece of meat and high quality processing with it??

WineMaster
01-31-2013, 12:20 PM
Where did he say in the post that he wants a Dirt-Cheap piece of meat? He just dont want the cuts hacked up.

Slamdunkpro
01-31-2013, 01:37 PM
RD's Angus brand is an Excel private label. The ones we get at our local RD have paper thin flats and huge fatty points. They're OK as eaters but I'd never compete with one.

Q-Dat
01-31-2013, 03:16 PM
You want a dirt-cheap piece of meat and high quality processing with it??

I wouldn't call $2.74 per lb dirt cheap. Less than most supermarkets, but not dirt cheap by any stretch.

sdbbq1234
02-03-2013, 04:28 PM
"Dirt cheap" is relevant. 20 years ago, it was as close to dirt cheap as I could imagine. The normal price in North Texas was $.79lb. On sale, it was $.49lb.

That was before everyone wanted it.

Supply and demand dictates the price.

The fact that the big slashes in the flat part have sometimes always been there, just something I live with.

I really try to look at a brisket from all aspects (marbling, skinny flat end, white or yellowish fat, and of course the slash).

Sometimes it's good, sometimes not.

Very good info from Smoke and Beers!

wallace

Smoke & Beers
02-04-2013, 03:55 PM
I really try to look at a brisket from all aspects (marbling, skinny flat end, white or yellowish fat, and of course the slash).

Sometimes it's good, sometimes not.


wallace

FYI...
Yellow Fat = Grass fed
White Fat = Feed yard

I prefer feed yard cattle

sdbbq1234
02-04-2013, 06:45 PM
FYI...
Yellow Fat = Grass fed
White Fat = Feed yard

I prefer feed yard cattle

+1^^^^

wallace

boogiesnap
02-04-2013, 08:56 PM
FYI...
Yellow Fat = Grass fed
White Fat = Feed yard

I prefer feed yard cattle

i like the white fat too, but not sure if grass fed=yellow fat.

this is a grass fed brisket. fat is pretty darn white.

75441