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porkingINpublic
08-08-2012, 10:54 PM
Ok I've done kcbs and mbn but I just registered for a IBCA..

The main difference that I can see is chicken... Half chicken vs thighs
No garnish vs garnish...

What else can I expect to see different?

ThomEmery
08-08-2012, 11:31 PM
The turn in times are longer
General public on the tables
Your entry will be judged along side the other top boxes
Provided you make the final table

Great way to spend a weekend ;0)

ATXBBQ
08-08-2012, 11:44 PM
I've cooked a few and they don't like trimming meat after it's off the cooker (cutting the edges of brisket slices to fit the box) so make sure you halve your chicken and trim your brisket to fit the box before you cook it.

Funtimebbq
08-08-2012, 11:56 PM
IBCA rules also limit the brisket to 7 slices only, no burnt ends. You need to turn in 7 ribs only, no more/no less.

Good luck,
Benny

gmholler
08-09-2012, 08:24 AM
And the cooks meeting is usually MANDATORY. Go to it, listen, and introduce yourself to the head judge. Your questions can't be answered if you don't ask!

If you can find another IBCA contest before yours that you can get to, I'd suggest you go to it and judge before cooking in one - see just what gets turned in. Also, go to http://www.ibcabbq.org (http://www.ibcabbq.org/) and read the rules - that ought to give you some ideas and maybe some specific questions!

Lynn H.

Candy Sue
08-09-2012, 09:27 AM
Brisket slices as thick as a pencil. Ribs placed horizontal to the box hinge. Piece of foil (provided) for the bottom of the box. Make sure your food tastes good room temp. Overcook as compared to KCBS.

nukenight
08-09-2012, 09:53 AM
The amount of product also increases as the contest gets beyond 50 teams. So instead of one half chicken, you might have to turn-in two halves. You might even have to go to 9 slices of brisket and 9 rib bones too. This will be covered in the cooks meeting.

Countryhb
08-09-2012, 10:14 AM
Little trick/tip...the foil given for the box DOES NOT need to be arranged like garnish, nor does it need to line the entire bottom of the box. I fold it into a square and set it in the bottom of the box.

bruno994
08-09-2012, 10:49 AM
What event are you cooking? The IBCA is well run especially with folks like 'gmholler' running some events (and cooking others). I usually cook 1 brisket, 2-3 racks of ribs and 2 cut in half, less than 5# chickens (very important to keep the yardbirds under 5# to fit into the turn in boxes). Judges take meat samples with plastic knife and fork, so overcook the meat a bit. Ribs to fall off the bone and brisket as tender as you can get it while maintaining the slices. Good luck.

Carnivorous Endeavors BBQ
08-09-2012, 11:08 AM
Lots of Good Advice given above. I'll reiterate some of those points and suggest that you get a few styrofoam trays and do a practice cook. You want your Brisket and Ribs overdone by KCBS standards. Once you complete each meat, place it in a box and let it sit at room temperature for 15-30 minutes then sample it using a plastic knife and fork. This is likely what preliminary table judges will taste. Close it back up and let it sit another 15-30 minutes, then sample it again with a plastic knife and fork, This is likely what final table judges will be tasting of your product. Make sure you can easily get samples of your ribs with the plastic utensils as a frustrated judge probably won't score well. This is just my opinion but since you are cooking for the general public, I wouldn't try to get too "fancy or overly complicated" with the flavor profiles and just stick to good and balanced backyard style food. As Lynn stated earlier, judging an IBCA competition before you compete in one would be a huge benefit to you. Especially since you usually get to sample the top 10 finishers turn-ins after awards are announced.

RangerJ
08-09-2012, 02:12 PM
Rules are on the IBCA site. Pretty straight forward. Don't over think it, just cook the best product you can on that day and enjoy the 1.5 hours between turn ins and not having to garnish a box or trim thighs!

porkingINpublic
08-09-2012, 08:50 PM
Rules are on the IBCA site. Pretty straight forward. Don't over think it, just cook the best product you can on that day and enjoy the 1.5 hours between turn ins and not having to garnish a box or trim thighs!

That was a big reason for joining this comp! Lol

Are the judges suppose to eat the ribs with a fork and knife?

ATXBBQ
08-09-2012, 09:30 PM
That was a big reason for joining this comp! Lol

Are the judges suppose to eat the ribs with a fork and knife?

Yes fork and knife

Swamp Donkeyz BBQ
08-09-2012, 09:39 PM
You'll like it. Like everyone says "keep it simple". Make sure your ribs don't get any of the glaze on the sides. They'll think you sauced them after the cook and disqualify your box.

ATXBBQ
08-09-2012, 10:40 PM
You'll like it. Like everyone says "keep it simple". Make sure your ribs don't get any of the glaze on the sides. They'll think you sauced them after the cook and disqualify your box.

I've seen some judging coordinators take a plastic knife and lay it on top of a rib during check in and if the knife is covered in sauce when it is picked up they turn you away. Sauce must be cooked on.

Crash
08-10-2012, 05:36 AM
Little trick/tip...the foil given for the box DOES NOT need to be arranged like garnish, nor does it need to line the entire bottom of the box. I fold it into a square and set it in the bottom of the box.
This may vary depending on the IBCA reps. Like you, we always folded it into a square when cometing on the mainland. At our last event in Hilo, HI, we were specifically told that it was a violation to "sculpt" the foil.

Personally, I think the folded foil looks much better.

porkingINpublic
08-10-2012, 07:34 AM
Sauce cooked onto the meat? wow thats pretty anal....

so as long as i glaze my ribs and then let it finish up the last 30 minutes of my cook that should be fine?

but you can't sauce your pulled pork once its been taken off the smoker?

gmholler
08-10-2012, 08:47 AM
Sauce cooked onto the meat? wow thats pretty anal....

so as long as i glaze my ribs and then let it finish up the last 30 minutes of my cook that should be fine?

This is how the rule currently reads:

" Meats may be cooked with sauces and/or other liquids, but once the cooking is complete, sauces and/or liquids may not be added once put into tray. NO PUDDLING IN BOTTOM OF TRAY."

It sounds to me like you should not have any problems, as long as your glaze stays on the meat and doesn't run off and puddle in the tray.

but you can't sauce your pulled pork once its been taken off the smoker?

Most contests do just chicken, pork spare ribs, and beef brisket. If pork is included, it's usually pulled, but you really need to check with the organizer on this and see how they want it. It's usually up to the contest organizer how they want the pork turned in - we have one contest that specifies pulled pork and asks us to make sure to mention at the cooks meeting that it's ONLY pulled that gets turned in - they do that because the pork category goes MUCH quicker when all the judges have to do is pick up some pulled pork on a fork to get a taste instead of having to cut off a piece. Remember, the rules specify what IBCA *recommends*; ideally, all the boxes will look the same so there's no question of knowing which is whose.

Lynn H.

porkingINpublic
08-10-2012, 04:25 PM
We have pulled pork in this comp. that makes sense

Funtimebbq
08-10-2012, 04:47 PM
Don't know if it has changed but when I last competed in an IBCA contest with pork as a category, we were instructed to fill (cover) the bottom of the box with "finger" size pieces of pork. Again, be careful about the sauce dripping.

backyard
08-10-2012, 07:47 PM
I wouldn't get too worked up about the sauce cooked on. Most of the time my glaze is spooned on then back on the pit for a pre-determined amount of time then sprayed, all while still on the pit. Once off, they rest, then sliced. The sauce is tacky, but cooked on. Ribs usually hit, and sometimes do nothing at all. I think.....if a turn in is disqualified for whatever reason, the head judge will call the number out. It's never happend to me. At some cookoffs a glazed brisket does will, at others, it might not do so well.
Just try to follow the rules and you should be fine. Welcome to IBCA:icon_bigsmil.

They are pretty strict about "no puddling in the tray". But they help you clean it up at turn in if it's an issue.

Anyway good luck and welcome. Maybe I'll get to meet you down the road.

Pitmaster T
08-10-2012, 08:05 PM
Overcook as compared to KCBS.


You mean of course... it does not need to be tough and undercooked like KCBS.

ThomEmery
08-10-2012, 09:19 PM
A couple a paper towels folded to points
One dry one damp could be real handy when they look into your box at turn in
You can make a quick fix of pooling etc

porkingINpublic
08-10-2012, 09:25 PM
This brings up another interesting point... They will let u adjust it even after turn in? If time is still remaining? I assumed once it's turned in u are done with it. Will they check it at turn in and tell me if it's puddled?

I'm not gonna sweat it to much... I don't know of another IBCA I will enter, but for $125 and an hour from home I can't pass it up. :grin:

ThomEmery
08-10-2012, 09:39 PM
They open box count the number, type and size of pieces
You can if there is time fix your problem

Some of the nicest folks you will ever meet at these cook offs

ZILLA
08-10-2012, 10:06 PM
I've seen some judging coordinators take a plastic knife and lay it on top of a rib during check in and if the knife is covered in sauce when it is picked up they turn you away. Sauce must be cooked on.


This is not an IBCA rule or accepted practice. It is practiced only in the LSBS and will likely be voted out by years end. Cooking the sauce on the meat was done away with about two years ago, maybe longer.

Homebrewed Q
08-10-2012, 10:26 PM
I've cooked at 3 IBCA events so far, all were fun and well organized. I look forward to more in the near future. Good luck!

ZILLA
08-10-2012, 10:26 PM
The idea of having to "Overcook" turn in meat in Texas competitions is all wrong and probably the most misunderstood concept I see in discissions about Texas comp cooking. If you overcook your meat, or if you cook it to anything close to a mushy texture I can asure you of one thing, you will lose. We do not like mushy, overcooked BBQ in Texas.

There is a window of what is considered "done" You should cook towards the tail end of the window and here is why. The judges cannot touch the food. They have to use a cheap plastic knife and fork to slice off the sample they want to taste. So it will benefit the cook to make it as easy as possible for them to taste the food in the manner described. If the judges could pick up the meat with there fingers like at KCBS comps the cookers would not cook to that degree of tender here in Texas. This has been my personal experience of cooking 100+ Texas comps and as an IBCA judging official. If you need any futher help don't hesitate to contact me. I hope you have a great experience and good luck.

porkingINpublic
08-10-2012, 10:54 PM
Zilla I may be hitting u up sometime about this! Thanks!

The only thing that I see benefiting from being cooked a little longer is the ribs...l brisket, ppork, and chicken are tender enough to eat with plastic fork but I could see ribs benefiting from being closer to fall of the bone style.....

Crash
08-11-2012, 07:41 AM
Don't know if it has changed but when I last competed in an IBCA contest with pork as a category, we were instructed to fill (cover) the bottom of the box with "finger" size pieces of pork. Again, be careful about the sauce dripping.

We specifically asked the IBCA reps about the "finger" sized pieces of pork for turn-ins at our last event. We were told that it was not acceptable....pulled pork only.

Again, I have to believe this may vary depending on the IBCA reps....or maybe the rules have changed.

ZILLA
08-11-2012, 08:51 AM
There are no specific rules about pork butt in any of the Texas organizations because it's not considered a sanctioned meat. The general rules apply but we have no specific rules. Pork Butt is considered an open meat catagory and the details are left to the promoter. If I were judging an event that stated pulled pork I'd accept anything that was separated into pieces but not sliced. As stated above it's left to the promoter and unfortunatly sometimes the judging official to determine the details.

ZILLA
08-11-2012, 09:02 AM
This may vary depending on the IBCA reps. Like you, we always folded it into a square when cometing on the mainland. At our last event in Hilo, HI, we were specifically told that it was a violation to "sculpt" the foil.

Personally, I think the folded foil looks much better.


The judging official is supposed to instruct the head cooks at the cooks meeting to lay the entire open sheet of foil in the bottom of the tray, shiny or dull side up that doesn't matter, but the foil needs to be placed into the box the same way in all trays. Remember that the intended purpose for all the box rules are to insure that they are as alike as possible to try and eliminate marked trays. There are many rules that are not given clarification in writing that are still supposed to be implemented by the judging official.