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trekmstr
07-28-2012, 09:09 PM
Did a cookout today for a local school fund raiser. $10.00 entry fee for ribs or $ 15.00 for ribs & chili. we were to prepare 20 lbs of ribs and 4-6 quarts of chili.
We were debating how to prepare our meat. Would civilians understand the same things about perfect ribs that K.C.B.S. judges are taught? We were happy when we heard that the judges were actual cooks at local restaurants.
I turned in 3 Cadillac cut ribs from the same thin spare rack. They were perfect. One judge gave me an 8 for appearance and a 1 for tenderness. This same judge was also way off on some other scores.
One contestant used to work for one of the judges and was told by him that he missed out on first place because the meat did not fall off the bone when picked up.:crazy:
This same competitor does compete on the K.C.B.S. circuit. He sampled my ribs and said they were spot on and that I should have been in top 3 with him.
Now Iím not complaining (exactly) as this was a first year event and was a fund raiser for a local school sports team. We were glad to participate at an something that will hopefully turn into a really popular local event. We had a good time, tried some new rubs & sauces. But were disappointed by the complete ignorance by the judges.
I guess Iím wondering if other have had similar experience and did you intentionally overcook your ribs? we have already agreed to do it again next year but will be overcooking our ribs.

LTG
07-28-2012, 09:46 PM
Well, I just went threw this today in fact cooking ribs in the backyard division of a local KCBS contest. I went with less heat in the rub and foiling prep and a goal of slightly overdone meat(in the eyes of KCBS standards). Judges were local celebrities. In hindsight, I wish I would've stuck to how I normally do them.

porkingINpublic
07-28-2012, 10:05 PM
I overlooked my ribs at a unsanctioned event and got 5th/50. I've heard of them tightening back up after they sit for awhile so I assumed that's what happened.

Shady
07-29-2012, 06:17 AM
I cook in two events with celeb and non-KCBS judges and won ribs in both. I cooked the ribs for 45 minutes longer that I do in KCBS comps to were the meat barely stayed on the bone.
I always went with the fall off the bone tender for me and it works if your not in a KCBS comp.

Lake Dogs
07-29-2012, 08:15 AM
Never expect KCBS standards in non-sanctioned cookoffs.

Also know that most sanctioning bodies define the perfect rib tenderness, and *BAM* many define it differently. Yes, different than KCBS's definition.

So, know the sanctioning body and know how they define rib tenderness. CBJ's are trained to judge against the standard, not choose their favorite.

In your case, no standard, you get whatever those judges at your table preferred. The problem is some people prefer ribs so tough you have to gnaw them off the bone, and others want ribs where the meat literally cannot be picked up on the bone (it falls off that easy). Most of us are somewhere in between. Get a mixture of these folks judging your table and frankly you're screwed. For this reason I never participate in unsanctioned contests.

Had a debate with a fairly new competitor about a year ago and said the same thing, then he kept saying "I'm doing it for the fun and not worried about the results", then a few weeks later he came back complaining because he didnt like the scores a few judges gave him and wanted to know how he should improve and what to change. I had to go back an pull exactly what we'd written a few weeks ago. Take nothing away from an unsanctioned contest. Nothing at all. Enjoy it if you want, but dont read anything into the scores.


The two biggest definitions are "bite through cleanly" = KCBS and "pull cleanly from the bone with only slight resistance" MBN/GBA and others. They're about 15-30 minutes difference in these cooks depending on smoker & temps, etc.

Side note: If an unsanctioned competition has CBJ's, dont expect anything different unless that contest defines the perfect rib tenderness. Otherwise you'll still get their scores based upon their preference.

Alexa RnQ
07-29-2012, 09:36 AM
I coached an online friend through a rib cookoff recently. The VERY first thing I said to her was, "In an unsanctioned cookoff, all bets are off."

As you said, you were there to cook for a fundraiser. That's going to be their man focus. Submitting three bones is brutal, though. If even one judge doesn't care for something about your entry, that can kill you -- there's not a large enough panel to throw out a low score, if such an idea was even considered.

What will magically erase ignorance in three people who have had no standards set for them? You knew they were cooks from local restaurants, there would have been your first big indicator of what they would expect.

However, you've gained a valuable knowledge base if you decide to participate in this fundraiser again next year.

porkingINpublic
07-29-2012, 09:39 PM
I think there are things to take away from unsanctioned events.... Experience and timing are the 2 big things we get from them. U still cook to finish at a specific time... And we always find something we could have done better or that would have made things easier

trekmstr
08-02-2012, 08:15 PM
I think there are things to take away from unsanctioned events.... Experience and timing are the 2 big things we get from them. U still cook to finish at a specific time... And we always find something we could have done better or that would have made things easier

that was excatly our point too. we got to work on our timing and tried a slightly differnt rub and sauce profile.

caseydog
08-02-2012, 08:30 PM
It was a fundraiser. So, did you have fun raising funds? If not, then don't do it again. Seriously, if the goal is to raise money for a good cause, then cook your meat, and have fun doing it. Switch off your KCBS competition mode, and just make good food and raise money.

The number one reason I have no interest in doing BBQ competitions is that, from what I've read in this forum, within one season, I'm afraid I'd hate cooking BBQ and want to sell off all my grills and smokers.

Life is about balance. These kinds of competitions offer an opportunity to just cook for the fun of cooking.

Just my two-cents.

CD

trekmstr
08-03-2012, 10:05 AM
It was a fundraiser. So, did you have fun raising funds? If not, then don't do it again. Seriously, if the goal is to raise money for a good cause, then cook your meat, and have fun doing it. Switch off your KCBS competition mode, and just make good food and raise money.

The number one reason I have no interest in doing BBQ competitions is that, from what I've read in this forum, within one season, I'm afraid I'd hate cooking BBQ and want to sell off all my grills and smokers.

Life is about balance. These kinds of competitions offer an opportunity to just cook for the fun of cooking.

Just my two-cents.

CD

Thanks for your response. I really do appreciate it.

As I stated @ the beginning we did have a good time.

My partner and I have discussed this at length and have decided to do the event again next year. As a matter of fact my partner plans to work with the event organizer on next yearís event to help with promotion so we can help to make the event even bigger and hopefully more successful.

We did get to achieve all if our goals for the event.
1. Have fun
2. Try new rub
3. Try new sauce (awesome, by the way)
4. Work on timing
5. Help raise money for a local charity. (with success)


As you may have noticed, there is no bullet point for win awards. Of course we would have enjoyed doing that had it happened, but that wasnít the reason we were there. As I said to numerous people both before and after the judging it really is like football, except itís ďany given SaturdayĒ.



We also were happy with the quality that was turned in by backyard teams. We really did have competition and we were glad to have it. If i do win an award i want to earn it, or else it isnít worth it.



One bullet point that isnít on the list and it will be added for all future cooks, competition, fund raising and personal, will be 6. Learn something new.



My point was really my disappointment at what people who work in the restaurant business think about B.B.Q. at lease up here in Wisconsin.