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View Full Version : Fence around your area at a contest


Sawdustguy
10-10-2005, 11:36 AM
This past summer at our first contest we thought we had a good set-up until Sunday morning when the crowds started coming in. We had people come in to our area uninvited and open the smokers for a look (almost got in a fist fight over that) and someone actually opened up one of our coolers and grabbed a soda when they thought we weren't looking (lost them in the crowd). I saw some teams had picket fences in front of their spot. Is it common place for the public to be so brazen to do these things? I am definetly going with some sort of barrier next year to keep them out.

chad
10-10-2005, 11:51 AM
A lot of folks use fences or posts and chain or other variants to mark their areas. Tim and I have talked about this but usually we arrange our area where people would have to make an effort to squeeze into our area.

Realistically, if idiots are going to go through your area they'll do it in spite of fences, ropes, etc. Opening a cooker or cooler is just RUDE no matter how you look at it. :twisted:

Look around at the different setups and find one that you can duplicate and is easy to setup/take down and transport. The fences, entry way, etc. definately dress up the area, too.

spicewine
10-10-2005, 12:02 PM
Wow!! Sounds like you go to some rough contests!!! I have enough people on my team to supervise the entire area. If they reach in our coolers or open our cooker, they will probably draw back a bloody stub :twisted:

Ron_L
10-10-2005, 12:07 PM
Can you say "attack dog"?

Geez... I've only been to two competiions, but no one has been that brazen. We have arranged our space to put the "kitchen" area is the leat accessible, but if someone really wanted to get in there they could.

One other thought... When we were at Peoria i noticed that Bar-b-quau had their kitchen and cookers behind their campar, and they had a little picket fence blocking access to that area. Maybe that's why they set up like that.

BBQchef33
10-10-2005, 12:08 PM
Home depot has plastic chain link in 20 foot sections. We were across from you, and thats what we used. This should tie in to your other questtion about the 10x20 canopy ad why i section off an area "out front". The divider and the chain link keeps people out of your kitchen. You will always have the ballsey ones that think they can wander in and out, but if u make it look like they are coming into your front door, they tend to stay out a little more.

Beofre using the split tent concept, parrothead and I have had people walk under our canopy and start slicing slices off of our breakfast. He jsut wandered right in like he owned the place.

The reason i keep my smoker up on the trailer and use it as a cooking platform, is that it keeps people away from the cooker. They may walk behind it, but will not walk up the ramp. I have seen many a pit get opened by spectators, and I have heard many an argument start from it.

At Grillkings, some lady was trying to take ribs from our turnin selection. I caught several people in our cooler.

If you give out ONE sample, do it VERY discreetly. If someone catches you, prepare for the stampede. I always liken it to feeding seagulls or ducks at a pond. If you throw ONE french fry out, or one piece of bread, the entire population of that critter will come running. Well, give out a chicken thigh to someone while your standing next to the open pit, and before you know it, EVERY person within eyeshot will be walking over. Its friggin pathetic.

At ashbury park after turn-in, I handed a plate of chicken and brisket to my wife while standing on the trailer next to the pit. It was for the kids and her. A rather LARGE woman came over with a dish and said can I have a sample?, her plate was full allready. I politly told her no samples yet and she argued, pointing at my wife... "SHE got a SAMPLE... u just like the Hotties". I told her thats my wife, feeding my kids. She just grunted walked away.. I hope she was embarrassed.

One guy became hostile and pissed becase we wouldnt "GIVE" him any samples. He started yelling "all I got is a f***ing piece of sausage and it sucked."

Ribfest, people from the crowd were complaining becase we were not "allowed" to give out samples.. they would show up at noon expecting a free lunch... in the middle of turn-in, and when denied of that, they would start name calling.

It is at all the competitions, and unless foodTV stops showing the competitiors giving out samples, its not going to go away. Promoters tell them to come SAMPLE real BBQ... some advertise 'sampling'. So people come expecting the free meal. Some venues charge admission to get into the competition area. Spectators expect something for that admission fee and they expect it from us. At one venue, one of the teams politely told a person asking for samples that they can purchase a sampler platter from the vendors, and the person got pissed and got 'attitude'. "WTF did i pay 10 bucks for?"(or whatever the entry fee was) she said?? she was right. The only thing there was BBQ vendors and BBQ competitors. That entry fee lined someones pocket.. and put us(the competitors) on the spot.

One team, right after turnin, put a sign up. SORRY, Out of Samples". I never saw them give any out, but the strategy worked.

Solidkick
10-10-2005, 12:42 PM
A .357 strapped on your waist might help keep people out of your site too........

chad
10-10-2005, 01:45 PM
It is amazing! Tim and I usually start packing up the meat and icing "leftovers" down as soon as the last box goes to the judges. We've been asked about food and ALWAYS say, "Sorry, we're not vending" and "We've already put everything away".

Heck, I'm judge and competitor and have only tasted a few other guy's food. :cool: Of course, I don't ask and don't look "longingly" at whatever's still out - usually brisket since that's the last meat turned in.

The public does not understand that the competiors aren't making $$$ at these events. They also don't understand the usual "gentlemen's agreement" that non-vending competitors don't feed the public and therefore take away $$$ from the vendors and vending competitors. It really gets confusing at events that mix the vendors, vending competitors, and non-vending competitors all in one area.

At Dillard the vending competitors like ButtRub.com and Pig Pals were on the craft and vendors side of the grounds.

You have to remember too that at a lot of KCBS events the sponsoring group gets 10 percent of everything vended (use of Pig Points "money" only) and encourage everyone to vend - they don't charge the teams extra to vend but they get 10 percent - this sticks in the craw of some spice vendors since they have overhead, stock, and taxes to consider.

Jeff_in_KC
10-10-2005, 03:27 PM
Move to the Midwest where folks still have manners.

Really! I didn't even see much of that at the Royal and there were probably more drunks there than any contest in the world. We just had one guy come into our private party on Friday evening and when told, he just left. He didn't open or touch anything.

The_Kapn
10-10-2005, 03:43 PM
I just find all of this amazing.

I have not been around "forever"--but I have never seen anything like what is being reported from the NY area. http://bbq-brethren.com/forum/images/smilies/icon_evil.gif

That would call for a 12 guage http://bbq-brethren.com/forum/images/smilies/icon_evil.gif
RUDE http://bbq-brethren.com/forum/images/smilies/icon_evil.gif

TIM

Arlin_MacRae
10-10-2005, 04:17 PM
Louisville Slugger Mod

rbsnwngs
10-10-2005, 06:16 PM
at the grill kings event i had an old man and his wife take chicken wings right off my grill. we were still cooking these wings

parrothead
10-10-2005, 06:47 PM
Yep! I never saw it as bad as I did at the Long Island comps. In Illinois, no problem. Peoria, we had to beg people to take food.

smokincracker
10-10-2005, 08:31 PM
unreal in the cooler.

Wow
Must be a Yankee thing.

Donít every one have a grumpy one armed man on staff to keep the pushy people at bay.
Doug is very effective he is like a watch dog.

Seriously that blows me away. Never had to deal with that!
Good luck with that bros....

BBQchef33
10-10-2005, 08:53 PM
Grillkings was by far the worse. Some People were just unbelievably brazen. Everytime i tuned around, someone was grubbing.

My theory, blame BLI. The local radio station. They talked up the event and the DJ's always added their own slant and one of those slants was to go down and get some BBQ.... being there were no vendors.. who do ya think evertyone looked to to get that BBQ? The competitors.

Add that to the fact that venue was a state park that charged 8 bucks to get in ..... that added up to a bunch of NY'ers expecting something...

Then in highland, the promoters touted the event as a "rib festival". Then charged admission to get into the grounds. All that was inside was 2-3 Q vendors and some incidentals(lemonade, ices, fries). Wheres the festival.??

I think that real BBQ, being only a few years old AND very seasonal(June-Sept) in NY, that the promoters, whoever they may be, from Gillkings, to Radio stations to rotary clubs, are doing the FOODTV stereotyping. The whole concept of BBQ competitions are new to everyone and even the spectators are going on what they are told, or see on TV. Although going thru our coolers, or cutting of a hunk of our breakfast fatties, or taking Wills wings off the grill.. thats sh*ts just plain old rude.... the looking for freebies is caused by the promoters, and until they learn how to do it, we better bring extra.

CarbonToe
10-11-2005, 04:12 AM
We had people come in to our area uninvited and open the smokers for a look (almost got in a fist fight over that) and someone actually opened up one of our coolers and grabbed a soda.

The bl00dy cheek of it!! I would believe people would act like that. :evil:

Don't people realise they aren't at a trade food show and they are at a BBQ?

CarbonToe
10-11-2005, 04:17 AM
Add that to the fact that venue was a state park that charged 8 bucks to get in ..... that added up to a bunch of NY'ers expecting something...

......And they get plenty. They get to be social with you guys whilst absorbing the sights and smells.

Walking into someones patch and just taking food, even worse carving it first(!) is just plain wrong. I can't believe that they are so selfish they don't know thats wrong?

rookiedad
10-11-2005, 08:48 AM
hi, i was at grill kings as a spectator and it was the first competition i have ever been to. in fact phils article in newsday got me to join up with this group. i was so happy that competitions were coming to long island, and to tell the truth, i went hungry! i did not want anything for free, but i was looking foward to the whole experience like you see on t.v. music, food, a watermelon pit spittin' contest! but...it was kind of a let down. there was no vending, and the only music i heard was coming out of phil's boombox! there were alot of stuff they could have done to make it a really fun event. we got some great bluegrass bands around here. could have had a rib eating contest! and it would have been nice to be able to PAY for some great bbq, after all without all that stuff why even have the spectators there in the first place? there was an eight dollar parking fee but the contest admission was free with an invitation. so in view of this i have written a short poem. here it is.

i am not defending
those who were rude.
but it would have been nice
to get some food!
phil

Jeff_in_KC
10-11-2005, 09:04 AM
I think spectators should be kept out from around 10 am to 1:30 pm on turn-in day.

Arlin_MacRae
10-11-2005, 10:00 AM
Nice poem, Rookiedad. ;)

Sawdustguy
10-11-2005, 06:02 PM
I think Grill Kings will be done a bit differently this coming year. It will be at Belmont Racetrack. It was difficult to do alot of the things that were suggested this past year because it was a state park. There were no vendors because of the State's contract with their own vendors. The State Park Parking Fee was unfortunate and not part of the Grill Kings event. This coming year I heard there will be music and a few more surprises. Again, the event was well run in spite of the difficulty in dealing with the state.

kcpellethead
10-11-2005, 06:19 PM
I think spectators should be kept out from around 10 am to 1:30 pm on turn-in day.

But Jeff, without the public who would want to sponsor teams? See, in my mind, it's all about the public. The sad part is when promoters misrepresent their events to make a few extra bucks. Those people should be strung up! The mad public can never find a promoter when they want to vent. They only find us competition teams because we are out there cooking for turn-in. People should take note of contests that make false advertisements and promises. Those events should be boycotted. There are too many good contests and too little time to attend these events where it is all about the promoter making a fast buck by not being honest. If a promoter's excuse is that he or she didn't know, then obviously they didn't do their homework by attending other events.

Okay, off my soap box now.

BBQchef33
10-11-2005, 06:30 PM
No soap box rod... your dead on.

In the case of grillkings, i think it was more the WBLI radio stations DJ's rambling on the week before the event, and in Highland, spectators also told me they heard it advertised as "come get some BBQ".... But in nearly all the venues, someone always said "thats how they see it on foodtv". NY is pretty much virgin territory as far as competions go, so i'll just sum it up to growing pains. Hopefully, I'll have some input into 2006 grillking event(july 16) and will Let the promoters know what happened.

Kevin
10-11-2005, 06:45 PM
Just my input here. I'm not a competitor yet. Actualy never attended a sanctioned event. I've learned a lot here and now know what to expect. Before that, my impression of a barbecue contest was exactly what you see on food tv. Great food free for the masses. OK I never realy believed that part, but that is the way it is portrayed.

Jeff_in_KC
10-11-2005, 07:55 PM
Rod, good point... I guess I didn't think of it that way but it does seem that there could be at least a short time when the public isn't allowed in other than quiet hours. But it's probably not an issue here in the midwest. If it wasn't at the AR, I can't imagine it would be anywhere in our region. Overall, while there were drunks and huge masses of people running around, those who did stop to watch did so politely and didn't ever ask for food. Most just watched for a bit, maybe asked a question or two and moved on. It sounds like the issue is a problem mostly in the northeast where the concept is relatively new, even for the promoters.

rookiedad
10-11-2005, 07:59 PM
o.k. heres a question. what is the norm at competitions. does the spectator get to eat or not. i was always under the impression that all the teams had a place at their camp where you could BUY (not take) some food. i thought teams with alot of trophys would be the big sellers and that competitors were trying to win to increase their on site sales. i was also under the impression that competitors were trying to drum up buisness for retail products, catering companys and restaurants as well.
phil

chad
10-11-2005, 08:24 PM
'dad: the answer to your question(s) is complex.

Some competitors NEVER vend, some always vend, some events allow vending, some charge a fee, some have VENDORS with contracts so competitors may or may not be allowed to vend.

The competition is actually seperate from the "festival" or event that's hosting (except for some like the Rib thing in Reno where the competitors MUST vend all day every day of the festival). Some promoters change the rules and don't let the competitors know in advance - I saw this at Sebring, FL (FBA) last year - previously there was no vending from competitors since the hosts (fire dept.) used the food sales as a fund raiser. Well, they changed the rules and some teams scrambled around to come up with supplies (meat usually isn't the issue) to vend 50 or 100 plates - whatever they cound find in the trailer! As a result everyone was pissed - the vending competitors, the public, etc. This was definately the promoters' fault.

The problem it seems they have in the NE is that everyone thinks all the ribs everyone is carrying around on TV are "samples" or freebies - they are usually purchased!

Tim and I have only vended once and lost our asses so we don't do it at all anymore. We are also not there to feed the public - hell, we pay between $700-$1000 per event to be there (fees and expenses) so in our mind we have no obligation to feed anyone but the judges (and volunteers/staff). We do give a few samples but since we're not a "name" team nobody comes schmoozing us!

rookiedad
10-11-2005, 10:00 PM
you're right. paying that much gives you the right to do what you want, but i would think that with that much outlay that anyone would welcome the oppurtunity to recoup some of that cash by vending. why did you loose your asses. was it a miscalculation or was no one buying. i would like to know because i am kind of interested in bbq as a buisness. here is another thing i have been wondering about that maybe you can help me with. to what end do most folks compete? i plan on competing next year and imho the idea of cooking is to have some fun and to feed some people, but the idea of competing is that plus getting some publicity in the ultimate goal of moving a product, weather that be a cookbook, sauces, rubs, mailorder products or to create demand for the food itself. it seems odd to me that teams would pay thousands of dollars to cook for judges to get a trophy maybe and thats it... but if that is what it is, please let me know.
phil

BBQchef33
10-11-2005, 10:10 PM
but the idea of competing is that plus getting some publicity in the ultimate goal of moving a product, weather that be a cookbook, sauces, rubs, mailorder products or to create demand for the food itself. it seems odd to me that teams would pay thousands of dollars to cook for judges to get a trophy maybe and thats it... but if that is what it is, please let me know.



I dont vend., have no book, sauce, rub, or anything else. I may sell a teeshirt or 2, and i love getting our name out there. I'll talk to anyone if they are interested, but if they are only there to grub with no interest in our craft, I feel like a caterer working for free. I do alot of charity events and public display type stuff where freebies are the norm, but a contest is a contest. when theres time, I will offer samples to the guy on the street whos polite and shows interest and remove the fingers of the person stealing a rib from my rib box.

So...., I spend the $$$$, to cook for judges and hopefully get some trophies ......and thats about it.

nmayeux
10-11-2005, 10:49 PM
Dad,
I guess I'm looking at it from a different perspective. Although my wife and I are going to start catering on the side, our catering business will help to offset our competition costs. We might sell a couple of t-shirts or something, but the competition is about doing my best, and being able to compare my results with the pros. I think Tim made me realize that I am paying THOUSANDS of $$$$$ just to get my teeth kicked in!

Now, as for the fencing, you yanks got me scared!

BBQchef33
10-11-2005, 11:11 PM
nope, brethren dont get there teeth kicked in... maybe just pushed back a little.:tongue:


Picture:

Look in the distance, just to he left of the american flag. You can see the top of my BYC on the trailer next to our tent, which is the big white one in the distance. Now, follow the people back....This is the line of people lined up for samples, and it was not the end of the line. the picture was taken just past the middle.

The_Kapn
10-11-2005, 11:35 PM
Dad,
I guess I'm looking at it from a different perspective. Although my wife and I are going to start catering on the side, our catering business will help to offset our competition costs. We might sell a couple of t-shirts or something, but the competition is about doing my best, and being able to compare my results with the pros. I think Tim made me realize that I am paying THOUSANDS of $$$$$ just to get my teeth kicked in!

Now, as for the fencing, you yanks got me scared!
Noah--
The teeth thing is not my phrase--someone else owns it! http://bbq-brethren.com/forum/images/smilies/icon_biggrin.gif http://bbq-brethren.com/forum/images/smilies/icon_biggrin.gif http://bbq-brethren.com/forum/images/smilies/icon_biggrin.gif

I do advocate "reduced expectations" for the first events--that is just reality--I think. I know Chad and I got the wind knocked out of us till we learned about and accepted the level of the competetion we faced http://bbq-brethren.com/forum/images/smilies/redface.gif
There are some "killer cooks' out there!

As to the crowds. I think it has been pretty well stated that this problem was unique (hopefully) to that event and not a regional thing. I have now competed in FL, AL, GA, and Il. Even cooking with a "Magnet" like DRBBQ--I have seen only a handfull of irritating spectators.
Period--not a problem so far (knock on wood).

Vending-- different subject.
You need to really think through the logistics and I will save my comments for another day on it!

So-learn that Lang 60--learn the meats and spices--and go cook in competetion--Judge--buy the books out there--and just do it all to learn!

Welcome to the Dark Side http://bbq-brethren.com/forum/images/smilies/icon_biggrin.gif http://bbq-brethren.com/forum/images/smilies/icon_biggrin.gif

TIM

Sawdustguy
10-12-2005, 12:08 AM
Rookiedad,

Usually if you won a trophy, you won the cash prize that went along with it. At the Grill Kings I think champion won $3000. Go to their site and you can see the prizes.

The_Kapn
10-12-2005, 12:24 AM
Rookiedad,

Usually if you won a trophy, you won the cash prize that went along with it. At the Grill Kings I think champion won $3000. Go to their site and you can see the prizes.
Your point is correct.
However, there is no way "on God's Green Earth" that "winings" will offset costs in the long run.

Winnings can help "offset" costs--but will never, ever "cover" costs--unless you are extremely talented and/or lucky!!!!

Even the "Superstars" have to do a "side" business based on BBQ to pay the bills. Or, they become "beholding" to a sponsor. Nothing wrong with that if they are happy.

For Dave and I, we just would like to (and must) start picking up some "place money" to help defray the vacumn of costs.

The "side" businesses will develop with time--if we are talented and lucky http://bbq-brethren.com/forum/images/smilies/icon_biggrin.gif

TIM

Sawdustguy
10-12-2005, 06:25 AM
I heartily agree. I was just pointing out that the better teams do not do this simply for a pat on the back.

rookiedad
10-12-2005, 08:38 AM
I dont vend., have no book, sauce, rub, or anything else. I may sell a teeshirt or 2, and i love getting our name out there.

So...., I spend the $$$$, to cook for judges and hopefully get some trophies ......and thats about it.


don't get me wrong, i think competitions are great and fun for both spectators and competitors and i'm sure that many individuals have many different reasons for competing, even if it's just a fun hobby to pass some time. its just that i thought that the high cost would make it prohibitive for the average person unless there was some sort of reason for them to do it, and it was the majority of competitors, not the individual, that i was inquiring about when i posed my question. also, when i said odd i didn't mean it in a derogatory way, i just meant against the norm.
phil

BBQchef33
10-12-2005, 09:08 AM
didnt take anything derogatory. :-?

....competing is an expensive hobby, and difficult at times. Unless u have a fully loaded trailer that is dedicated to competing, its a pain in the butt. It takes me close to 3-4 days to get everything ready for the first one of the summer. after that, unload, clean, reload, reshop... I learned to wash all the stuff at the site when were done, put it way clean and its easier to leave the trailer loaded for the summer. Then its only 2 full days work to reload/shop, etc...


Its is definately a labor of love. At times, at around 6-7 am saturday, when my A$$ is dragging behind me, i question my sanity. Even with the smokey mountains running on autopilot, we only get a few hours sleep. Im a night owl, body clock stops me from going to sleep till 2-3am and we have to be up at 5 and the sleep u do get is not too good depending on condidtions.. etc.. i can go on about the downsides, it dont matter. But I will keep doing it... cause I love to do it.. the people you meeet are the greatest, friendships are formed and at 10AM turning day its is just such a rush to start performing our craft in a comletitive atmosphere.. from 10-2 its what makes it all worth it. Paychecks are nice, but they arent the driving force.

Sawdustguy
10-12-2005, 09:47 AM
I agree with you Phil. Both Gary and I do this because it is a labor of love for us. I have been spending the off time until next year coming up with a system to make the process easier. This is actually no different than any other expensive hobby like audio, woodworking etc. I can tell you one thing for sure. In this hobby you will not meet nicer people who are always will to help you even if you are competing against them. Comradery in this sport is off the scale and very refreshing. You can't beat that with a stick. Why can't people just do something because they enjoy it? Why does there always be some monetary gain? If you are in it to make money, it's time to find something else.

HoDeDo
05-15-2006, 08:40 AM
Ditto Guy and Phil. My Dad, Uncle, and friends were doing competitions (small ones for fundraisers, etc.) before there was a KCBS - It was always about doing something you enjoy and BSing with a group of like minded individuals. I do it because makes my blood pump - sending that tray is the best. Definately a labor of love. But I get alot of fringe benefits - father/son time, and now that I cook with my brother in law and family also.... I get to watch the kids enjoy the fun - making new friends, and sharing that magic with them.

Jeff's (BigCreek BBQ) daughter and mine hit it off great at the start of this season, and Kaylin looks forward to every contest to see Taylor and cook in the Kid's Que! I'm starting to love this even more just becasue I get to see the impact it has on my girls. Considering that the News, TV, video games, etc. and everything else out there that is bombarding our kids - It's nice for them to see the comradery, friendship, and general goodwill of folks on the circuit. Let's see - 4 contests this year already, at about $450/each.... only $200 in prize money so far -- Definately NOT in it to make the money. :o)

Of the $7000-8000 we'll spend this year cooking 15-16 contests - I don't expect a penny of it back. I'd love to get the calls, and have a nice check with them - but the money is just icing.

Bigdog
05-15-2006, 12:08 PM
Thank goodness for this thread. It is a very important one for both the competitor and the public. These are the 2 perspectives here, and they are very different.

People going to a BBQ cookoff may expect samples. They probably aren't even aware of the edicate of the site either. For this, I blame the promoter. He/she should make it plain if samples are going to be available or not and if consessions are available. Every cookoff that I have been to do not make this clear. They just assume you know, and you know what can happen if you assume incorrectly.:shock:

Competitors on the other hand may or may not want people in their area. This also can be unclear. Fences tend to make this statement, but some just ignore it. They may also assume that people should know better than to open up someone's cooker without permission. Once again, this should be made clear by the promoters. Public people see people drinking and partying and just assume they are invited too.

So, here is what I reccomend. When you get to a competition, you get a piece of paper spelling out the rules and the way to get some food. I even suggest that a competitor should put up a sign if they wish to give out samples. Those who do not wish to give samples have to sign, so the sample searchers would know to not ask. I know, this assumes that people will read.:oops: This could even be done so as to not ruin the paid consessions on the site. Merely giving a sample to enourage them to go get a paid meal. You could have a variety of sample offerings: from free, to pay as you go or punches on a punch card.

The problem all seems to boil down to a lack of communication. The public is an important part of a competition but just needs to be educated so that all can enjoy these fine events. My .02

Sawdustguy
05-15-2006, 12:44 PM
Bigdog,

We are not taking any chances. We purchased Vinyl Fence so we can create a compound. We compete as a family with our wives and kids in attendance. We want to prevent a confrontation at all costs. These days you have no idea what John Q Public is cabable of especially when there is alcohol served to the public at some of these events. I know it's sad but I feel it is better to prevent the confrontation. Signs don't work. We tried that. The problem is that the public expects something for nothing. Here is a diagram of what we are doing this year.

http://www.2fatpolocksbbq.com/webimages/site.jpg http://www.2fatpolocks.com/webimages/site.jpg

Bigdog
05-15-2006, 01:08 PM
Guy,
You are right. Unfortunately some folks are just stupid, or have no manners and will try to get something for nothing. I agree that using fencing or some such thing may be necessary. It won't keep all out, just as the lock on your house will keep most out, but not the professional theif. My point was to educate the majority so good people would know the rules and not be frustrated. Then you just have to worry about the wackos.

billm
05-15-2006, 02:30 PM
Move to the Midwest where folks still have manners.
cant agree with that one..we have had similar stuff happen at comps and we only do midwest ones..
rudeness is not limited to any geographical area..

JohnMcD348
05-15-2006, 03:13 PM
I just find all of this amazing.

I have not been around "forever"--but I have never seen anything like what is being reported from the NY area. http://bbq-brethren.com/forum/images/smilies/icon_evil.gif

That would call for a 12 guage http://bbq-brethren.com/forum/images/smilies/icon_evil.gif
RUDE http://bbq-brethren.com/forum/images/smilies/icon_evil.gif

TIM

I have to agree with ya. I don't recall ever seeing much like that go on at teh contests I've been to and I was a spectator and very careful observer so I would think I would notice some of those things. I guess us Florida folks are a little more polite than up north.

I've seen a few different competitions around my area and seen how they were setup and run. THe PigFest in Lakeland, FL has become one of the biggest KCBS events and it's done pretty well I think. All the competitors/venders there have signs that they place in front of their stands that are Red Letters on White backing that simply state Vending(for pig bucks) or Competition only No Vending. This event has been going on for quite a few years now and I only started attending it over the last 2 years so they've had a long time to get things right. The first year I was there I was strictly a spectator without a clue what to expect. My second year there was as a brand spankin new KCBS Judge. I met Tim there and he showed me the ropes and introduced me to quite a few of the big timers there. I got to see more of the "other Side" of BBQ.

At the Smoke on the Water event in WInter Haven, FL, This past year was their 2nd annual event. I was there last year as a spectator and can say I was really not impressed. This year, they've gotten more of the kinks worked out and it turned out the be a pretty nice little event and has trhe great potential to become a pretty large FBA event. The first year, it wasn't that great, but then again it happens about 1-2 weeks after Pigfest. Lakeland and Winter Haven are 2 cities pretty close ot each other so alot of the same people from one would be at the other. I think the first year, everybody was having trouble. Temps were cold and alot of people were having trouble cooking. It was hard to tell who was vending and who wasn't. Very few were vending at that event. I think I stayed there long enough to buy one plate of food (it was nearly ice cold) and I left. The second year I was there helping the Southern Brethren cook as they were showing me the ropes and giving me an Idea of what goes on in a comp and I was taking notes to help me make better BBQ at home. Thanks again Tim and Dave. The second year they had entertainment setup, better hookup facilites for the competitors and a better layout in general.
Hopefully, with the next year, the coordinators will have a better idea of what needs are there. And, with some of you guys out there adding a little logistiical input tot eh sponsrs, it can only get better.

Bigmista
05-15-2006, 05:45 PM
We had a guy walk up and try to take a sample off of our cutting board while we were plating our brisket. I was tired, sleepy, cranky and holding a large knife. Not a good combination for people who have a fondness for all of their fingers...

CarbonToe
05-16-2006, 02:34 AM
http://www.ristoklint.com/picture-gallery-1L/pictures/electric-fence.gif