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Hogs Gone Wild BBQ
06-18-2012, 11:27 AM
Hey everyone, I am tring to study up on MBN, I would like to do one in the near future. I am familiar with FBA & KCBS. One question, on the blind box, does there have to be a minimum amount of portions turned in?
Thanks very much,
Doug

porkingINpublic
06-18-2012, 11:33 AM
6 judges.... Make ur ribs in pairs of 2. And there is no garnish so fill it up! I've only done 1 mbn. It was fun. But if you don't have the trailers and equipment to put on the show I'd save my money and do something else. You have to cook like 7 shoulders (1 box, 3 on site judgings, 3 more if you make finals). 11 racks of ribs. It adds up.

bbq.tom
06-18-2012, 11:35 AM
There is nothing in the MBN judge's manual concerning the amount of meat in the blind box. Hopefully an MBN cook can assist with this question. I judge MBN but don't cook MBN.

Hogs Gone Wild BBQ
06-18-2012, 12:11 PM
6 judges.... Make ur ribs in pairs of 2. And there is no garnish so fill it up! I've only done 1 mbn. It was fun. But if you don't have the trailers and equipment to put on the show I'd save my money and do something else. You have to cook like 7 shoulders (1 box, 3 on site judgings, 3 more if you make finals). 11 racks of ribs. It adds up.

That sure is a lot of meat, 7 shoulders and 11 racks of ribs!!! I guess it can add up quickly.

TooSaucedToPork
06-18-2012, 01:22 PM
Hey everyone, I am tring to study up on MBN, I would like to do one in the near future. I am familiar with FBA & KCBS. One question, on the blind box, does there have to be a minimum amount of portions turned in?
Thanks very much,
Doug

This was sent to me in an email about a year ago...best list I have ever seen. It is not my work, it was written by Tom from Pigs-R-Us Cooking Team. If you meet him at a contest, thank him.

Neil


MBN Contest Judging Information information provided by Big Tom

The following is some information compiled to help clarify any concerns about the judging & scoring process for the MBN sanctioned contests.
Some of the information is from the MIM judges training book, other information is from experience. MBN is a new contest network that has evolved from the original MIM.
The judging and scoring fundamentals are the same. Most of this information centers on the Rib and Shoulder categories. Many of the same principals will apply to the whole hog,
with consideration that all of the meat used for the judging process will come from the single whole hog.

Meats
Quantities of meats for the contest: For shoulders we will cook six to eight 15 - 16 lb. avg. shoulders and one 30 lb. case of 2-1/4 down loin back ribs (15 racks to the case).

Shoulder usage will be 1 or 2 for the blind box. We will also display 4 shoulders to the 3 on-site judges. Most teams elect to serve each on-site judge their own whole shoulder.
You can either bring the shoulder to the table or allow the judge to observe the meat being pulled from the specific shoulder that is designated.
Depending upon what we do with the blind box we could have 2 shoulders to use for the finals, if needed.

Rib usage will be 3-5 racks to assemble the blind box. We begin the on-site with 4 or 5 racks to present to the judges. The remainder may be used to keep the grill presentation looking full.
There are also 4 racks that will be designated for finals. We like to serve each finals judge their own rack.

Blind Judging
The blind judging for each category will take place at the same time of the on-site judging. You will be instructed of turn in times for each category.
Absolutely no decorations or garnish is allowed in the blind boxes. You can sauce, baste or dust with some rub, if it is not done in a way to identify your sample.
The shoulder blind box should be assembled using good size chunks of meat. I try to have a 50/50 mix of chunks with bark and without.
The large chunks will retain moisture better than small pieces or even chopped meat. Be very cautious of any pieces with visible fat; judges can be very critical of that.
For a whole hog you would be expected to serve portions of the ham, shoulder and loin. The loin could be cut into medallions for placement in the blind box.
No skin or bones are allowed in the blind box for whole hog.

http://www.soezzy.com/bbq/images/shoulder.jpg

That is an example of a shoulder box. You can also turn in more than one sauce with the blind box. You should be certain that the sauce(s) you turn in do compliment the meat.
The judges will be instructed to determine which sauce they prefer (if multiples) and then to judge and score the flavor including the sauce.
You may also give some regional consideration to your sauce selections to try and suit the judge's tastes.
For the shoulder or hog category you are almost expected to turn in a sauce with the meat.


There are many different ways to cut & section the ribs to build the blind box. Most teams will section the rack of ribs into portions that consist of 3 pieces of meat and 2 bones.
This allows judges to pull the bones apart to check for doneness and tenderness. The 2 bone portions can be arranged in the box to make an attractive presentation.


http://www.soezzy.com/bbq/images/ribs.jpg


Presently the trend is to serve wet ribs; you don't necessarily have to submit a sauce with the blind ribs. The same instructions will apply, if you offer a sauce the judges are to judge and score with the extra sauce.


Blind Judging and Scoring
The blind samples will be judged on the following criteria: Appearance of entry, Tenderness, Flavor and Overall Impression. All of the judging is comparative of the samples for the day.

Appearance of entry is scored by how well the entry looks in the box. How does the bark look, smoke ring?
Most judges at the table like to look at all boxes at once to determine the appearance, before they all start eating out of them.

Tenderness criteria is where the judges are looking to see if the meat is moist, they also check the texture, look for fat not rendered, check the degree of doneness, etc.
In the blind ribs the judges will look for the meat pulling from the bone clean and easily, not falling off the bone.

Flavor is going to be which of the samples tastes best; the combination of the meat and the sauce.
The judges will be sampling the meat after it has been sitting in the blind box for 10-15 minutes; be sure the meat is as warm as possible to retain heat.

Overall impression is the only truly subjective criteria. This is when the judge will actually rank the samples and is scored with a decimal (ex: the top sample would get 10.0).
The judging manual describes this criterion as a place to record differences in performance between teams that offer samples that are equal or nearly equal.
The other criteria scores can be duplicated for the other samples. The judge will only be allowed to score one 10.0 in the overall. The overall impression is not supposed to be an average of the other scores given to an entry.

A good tip for all blind boxes is to carry them in an insulated carrier, such as a pizza delivery bag.


On-Site Judging
The on-site judging is the portion of the MIM/MBA events that has many competitors intimidated.
The on-site judging will be scored in 6 criteria; the same 4 criteria as in the blind with the addition of Area & personal appearance and Presentation.
The 3 on-site judges will go to their assigned teams in a specific order in 20 minute intervals. The judges will be instructed to spend a minimum of 10 minutes and a maximum of 15 minutes.
Have your presentation timed and rehearsed to last about 12-14 minutes. This is your chance to sell your product to the judges.
Area & Personal Appearance is all about how neat and clean everything in the cook site is. The team does not have to have matching outfits; but everyone should have on clean shirts and aprons if used.
You also want to have the area well policed for any trash, cigarette butts, etc. You don't have to use crystal & china to score well, as long as the table setting is clean and appealing.
Keep all the trash cans out of sight from the cooking and eating area.

Presentation will be scored based on how well the team transfers information to the judge about the cooking process, preparations, sauces & rubs, the team, times, temperatures and etc.
The presentation does not have to be truthful but should be believable.
If you tell of any special ingredients or techniques the judge may expect that (what ever it may be) to be detectable in the product. You can also incorporate multiple presenters during the presentation to the judge.
The judge is going to expect to be informed about specifics of the meat, prep techniques, cooking time and temperatures and the type of wood/coal used and about the selection of the cooker.

Appearance of the Entry is scored by how the product(s) look on the cooker.
For the on-site judging you can decorate and garnish the grill.
The judge will also judge this based on how well the product looks when it is brought to the table.
The cooks will be instructed to serve the judge the meat that was shown on the grill. A couple of examples of some grill decorations are:


http://www.soezzy.com/bbq/images/pitshoulder.jpg

http://www.soezzy.com/bbq/images/pitribs.jpg

Tenderness is the same consideration as mentioned above in the Blind judging information.
The judges will look for the meat to be tender and pull cleanly from the bone; for the shoulders they may want to pull on some of the bones, or you can offer that option to them to demonstrate the level of doneness.
The correct tenderness that they are looking for is meat that will pull clean from the bone with a gentle pull but still retains its body (not mush).
A seasoned judge will try and pull the meat apart across the grain to test the tenderness.
Another on-site presentation trick is to allow the boned pulled from the shoulder to sit on a plate and bleach out to a white shade as the residual heat dries the moisture from the bone(s).

Flavor is the combination of the meat and the sauce.
The sauce could be added before, during or after the cooking process.
Any sauce you offer or display at the table may be subject to the judging and scoring.
Sauces are not required.

Overall Impression this is the place for the judge to reflect a completely subjective score that would sum up the total experience of judging the entry.

SCORING

All of the scoring is done on a 10 point system and is comparative for the samples of that day.
A 10 does not mean the sample is perfect it is an excellent sample, the best in an individual criterion for the samples of that day.
The judges are instructed to start your scoring with all 10's; and take any deductions from there.
Judges are allowed to score 10's in all the criteria for the teams/entries of that day except the Overall Impression, as mentioned before that is where the judge has to score any differences.

http://www.soezzy.com/bbq/images/scores.jpg

FINALS JUDGING

The preliminary blind and on-site scores for each category are compiled to identify the top 3 teams for each category and establish the rankings for the rest of the teams.
The traditional finals judging is done on-site only by a team of 4 judges traveling together to the top 3 teams for each meat category.
You would present and serve all 4 judges at the same time.
Some contests are electing to experiment with an all blind judged finals.

The teams that are in the finals will be notified of the estimated time that the finals judges will be at the team site.
The same time limits also apply in the finals round.
All of the same criteria are used for the finals as in the preliminary on-site judging; the only exception is that all scores are to a decimal value.
In the finals round all of the entries are competing against each other for the Grand Champion award.

There may still be specific questions, feel free to ask.

Best of luck!


Hope that helps!

Neil

Hogs Gone Wild BBQ
06-18-2012, 01:41 PM
Wow, a great read, thanks for sharing Neil.

Lake Dogs
06-18-2012, 02:10 PM
Perfect write-up.

5 blind judges; not 6.

On-site; you really dont have to have a huge/fancy trailer set-up. Judges do not score on flashy. Area and personal appearance is all about cleanliness, and to some degree looking like a team (ie. all wearing the same stuff and it being very clean). Presentation then is about having a story to tell and literally selling why your pork is the best out here. The difference in the "big teams" and the first timers here for onsite is the cleanliness and presentation, not the flashy trailers, etc. If that were the case, Gwatney would probably win every time. They dont. Also know, these teams specialize in PORK. They really know how to make some ****ed awesome pulled pork, ribs (usually BB's), and whole hog too.

Just dont look.... Rag Tag. That will get your personal appearance score lowered.

porkingINpublic
06-18-2012, 02:45 PM
My bad on the 6 instead of 5 blind judges...

1 more item to know... Don't cut ur ribs with a knife at ur on site judging... Pull it apart with ur hands. The judges drug me over the coals for that.

I will say that the people at the mbn judges/cooks were the nicest people we could have asked for. Very helpful. Wayne from Red Hot Smokers (won Memphis in may shoulders) came over and was very helpful, he obviously is in another league from us And didn't have to do that.

QN
06-18-2012, 02:55 PM
Actually, there are 4 judges at the blind table; not 5, not 6. Each table usually has six blind boxes to judge by 4 judges.

Market Hunter
06-18-2012, 03:21 PM
1 more item to know... Don't cut ur ribs with a knife at ur on site judging... Pull it apart with ur hands. The judges drug me over the coals for that.


Wow...I thought they would want a whole rack and they cut the portion they wanted on the plate.

Rub
06-18-2012, 03:44 PM
Doug, talk with Jimmy Smokin' Cracker. He's had a little experience with it.

bbq.tom
06-18-2012, 04:24 PM
ALL the MBN contests that I've judged to date have utilized 6 judges per blind-box table - not 4 or 5, but 6. Randy has always made sure we had 6 judges per table.

Just saying...

Lake Dogs
06-18-2012, 05:00 PM
ALL the MBN contests that I've judged to date have utilized 6 judges per blind-box table - not 4 or 5, but 6. Randy has always made sure we had 6 judges per table.

Just saying...

I'll be damned. I've always been at tables with 5... Dont know. I suppose it's an option (either way). And as I type this I do recall a few times; 6 judges... Mind getting old I suppose.

4 would be onsite, finals.

I've never seen 4 judges at a table.

I've judged many and competed in a few (never competed in whole hog though). Yeah, dont cut the ribs unless you're just trimming off the ends for beauty. Whole pork shoulder; WHOLE. They want to see that bone pulled out cleanly.

porkingINpublic
06-18-2012, 05:36 PM
And while I enjoyed mbn I still say its about the dog and pony show... Go back to season 1 BBQ pit master... The episode where they do mbn & kcbs. Myron didn't finish top 10 on any kcbs categories but won ever single category in mbn! That's a good example of the dog & pony show.... Maybe I'm wrong but I don't see anyway my 1 ez up tent & drum smokers can compete with 10 Bones and their mobile party trailers (yes plural!)

Hogs Gone Wild BBQ
06-18-2012, 05:39 PM
Sounds like a whole new world of BBQ to explore. I like that. Thanks for all the input from everyone.
Another question I have is, Spare Ribs are big in the FBA & are scored well in the KCBS, but would it be true to say, they would not do well in MBN? Do MBN judges prefer loin ribs?

Lake Dogs
06-18-2012, 07:12 PM
They *can* be judged very well, but I'd definitely ONLY do St. Louis. However, most high placing ribs are BB's. Know that MBN defines the perfect tenderness in ribs as "pull cleanly from the bones with only slight resistance" and KCBS defines it as "bite through cleanly". Use a 2 bone cut in MBN to give the judges the opportunity to pull one bone from the other. Let the on-site judge pull them apart. You might, in the sell, take that rack of ribs and do the first pull yourself then hand then/present them to the judge to pull for him/herself.

I would suggest to you that drum smokers dont present very well. While they may cook very well, they definitely present "rag tag". However, if they're painted REAL well, and cleaned REAL well, set up very neatly, presented by guys in uniforms that are very clean, they probably could compete. Mind you, I'm known for hitting the smoker with spray paint 10 minutes after meat is removed... 16 years old, it looks brand spankin' new for MBN presentations. We're wearing team shirts, with collars.
Starched. We've all had showers, even those of us up all night tending the fire.... Even the 2 of us wearing aprons are wearing team aprons, starched. Still under a 10x10 tent (with sidewalls). Got all 10's last outing in presentation and area/personal appearance. Big doesn't score high. Huge rigs dont. Trust me, Myron has MBN down pat. He's always clean, and makes an extremely polished presentation, and oh, by the way, the's a pork specialist. Chicken is something we eat fried, and brisket is for snacking on at home. This guy is awesome on pork. It's his "wheel house". The folks that do well in MBN generally dont do as well in KCBS, and visa. versa., because there's a completely different focus. Also, the standards for cooking and presentation (in blind) are very differently.

Hogs Gone Wild BBQ
06-18-2012, 07:38 PM
Thanks for the great information here. I do not have any drum smokers, I do have a couple nice looking cookers, not the biggest and baddest looking cookers around, but nice and clean, and they cook well. We all have team t-shirts, and always try and keep a clean appearance. I'm thinking we could have a good presentation with what we have. I would only do St. Louis style, it might be a different look for the judges.

Florida Farmer
06-19-2012, 08:34 AM
Maybe I'm wrong but I don't see anyway my 1 ez up tent & drum smokers can compete with 10 Bones and their mobile party trailers (yes plural!)

I'm sorry but I beg to differ....I have finaled before along with 10 bones and Boars Nite Out....at the time they were #1 and #2 MBN team of the year. They had their party trailers, full crews, elaborate decorations and all while I did have my big trailer, but a very simple onsite and a Lang 48 patio. Notice that I said "I"....cause that's all that there was there. Any time you final or even get close in MBN it's got to be good. The dog and pony presentation can make a difference in a close call, but it ain't gonna make a bad product taste good.

Lake Dogs
06-19-2012, 09:00 AM
+1 above. It's been a little while since my last MBN competition as a competitor, but on that outing we tied for 4th missing finals by a fraction. On this particular outing there were many of the big name teams that have GC'd MiM or won their category in MiM that we placed higher than, including Jacks and Boggy Pond (as best I recall). It was a good day. No big rigs for us. 2 EZup tents (divided by a wall so we could be preparing the next entry while 1 judge was on-site) and my Lang smoker; did both ribs and whole shoulders. I smoked a case of BB's (there were 12 in this case) and 3 cases of whole shoulders (9 x 21#).

You dont see many competing in MBN with BGE's or other similar sized smokers (ala. WSM's, UDS's, etc.) largely because of the volume of meat you need to cook. Ribs we look to 3 racks for blind, 3 racks for on-site, and 4 for finals, leaving only 2 or so that dont look perfect. You'll need a minimum of 7 shoulders, probably 8 (2 for blind, 3 for on-site, 2 for finals); we did nice because they came in cases of 3 each.


Rehearse! Rehearse/practice your spiel for on-site. Most use 1 presenter. We use 2. I greet and present the smoker. I have this spiel down pat and know our cooking process (as I'm the main cook) pat so that I can answer questions accurately. My/our other presenter presents the meat. He's a salesman and boy does he sell it! We're also judges; CBJ's. He knows how to hit every single judging point emphasizing how wonderfully the meat pulls cleanly from the bone with only slight resistance (or bone pulls cleanly from the shoulder), and as he's handing the meat to the judge stresses how wonderfully tender (and shows it), but allowing the judge to test for him/herself. Talks about the bark, and the smoke ring, and .... blah blah blah damned salesguy stuff... :-)

Money, big rigs, etc. doesn't buy this. Practice, polish, and great BBQ wins.

Hogs Gone Wild BBQ
06-19-2012, 11:20 AM
Thanks for more great information, sounds like we are heading in the right direction. I do have cooks that will be able to handle the capacity needed for pork shoulder & ribs. Presentation is something we will have to work on, but like you said practice, practice, practice.

porkingINpublic
06-19-2012, 12:53 PM
I'm sorry but I beg to differ....I have finaled before along with 10 bones and Boars Nite Out....at the time they were #1 and #2 MBN team of the year. They had their party trailers, full crews, elaborate decorations and all while I did have my big trailer, but a very simple onsite and a Lang 48 patio. Notice that I said "I"....cause that's all that there was there. Any time you final or even get close in MBN it's got to be good. The dog and pony presentation can make a difference in a close call, but it ain't gonna make a bad product taste good.

I cooked against 10 bones and bores night out. all good people.

This is my point... In the blind box our scores were great. we had 1 perfect score and 1 score that was almost perfect... but when combined with our scores from onsite it brought us down. We finished 6th in ribs and 5th in butts... I'm not complaining. I'm just saying when 10 bones has thier chandaleer (sp?) and chant they do to send off judges its gonna be tought to compete with onsite judges.

I'm in the process of upgrading my smoker to a larger size to handle the amount of meat required. I like mbn... but i think it would be better if everyone was on the same playing field....

Lake Dogs
06-19-2012, 01:03 PM
We did NINE shoulders; not nice... DOH.

3 shoulders per case x 3 cases = NINE shoulders (not nice shoulders). It was unnecessarily too many, but pricing was such that the last 1.5 shoulders were free... If we'd made finals I probably could've purchased an extra rack or two of pretty BB's, we had a few with shiners on 'em in that case.


Oh, dont get too caught up in the whole Memphis thing. Make your very best and present it as such. Last time we were out I "outsourced" my ribs to a friend, and he was all about putting out "Memphis Ribs" without sauce. I found out afterwards that this was his first time... While my shoulders were tied for 4th overall, his ribs were 4th from bottom overall. Lets just say I'll never outsource my ribs again... Lesson learned. Cook what you know and how you know it. If you do a knock-out spare rib, then do it, just make sure they're pull cleanly from the bone and amazingly tender. If you sauce, like with KCBS, only a small amount, not bathed in it. In pork, I highly suggest you present sauce on the side, two if they'll allow it. Give the judges options; options they dont have in other sanctioning bodies. I do (present multiple sauces); one is more middle-of-the-road sweet, compliments the meat without overpowering it, and does ok in sauce contests. The other is a vinegar based sauce with a bit more bite in it, still compliments the meat. This way the judge gets to decide which he/she likes best. Using after-comp feedback, 75% seem to really like my regular/sweet sauce, but that other 25% goes ape-**** over the vinegar sauce on the Q... On-site, make sure you have 2 or 3 sauces up there for them to use and choose. Some teams have that 3rd sauce be a mustard sauce, for those SC/NC type-o-guys...

Florida Farmer
06-19-2012, 01:52 PM
I think it's a pretty level playing field. I cook KCBS, MBN, FBA, and an occasional GBA. I feel that the judging....including the onsite...in MBN is just as fair and non-biased as any of the other sanctioning bodies.
I on the other hand, tend to do better in MBN on the onsite judging than on the blind boxes. I have no elaborate setup and certainly don't go to allot of extremes to impress the judges with anything EXCEPT the meat. If I have my enclosed trailer with me, I do all the presentation outside under the awning and keep all the messy stuff hid inside the trailer. If I'm not cooking out of my trailer, I'll use 2 10X10 popups, one with walls to keep everything out of the judges sight. Everything is pretty much real simple, cause doing it by myself means that I have to set everything up and then take everything down. Sometimes I cook 2 catagories and sometimes I cook all three....keeping the onsite simple really matters when cooking all three.

bbq.tom
06-19-2012, 02:30 PM
On-site, make sure you have 2 or 3 sauces up there for them to use and choose. Some teams have that 3rd sauce be a mustard sauce, for those SC/NC type-o-guys...

Lake Dogs - I hate to correct you, but I MUST...

Mustard sauce is a SOUTH CAROLINA ONLY thing!!! I've eaten at and reviewed 351 Q-joints and restaurants serving pork barbecue in North Carolina (for my book) and have only encountered mustard sauce served on the Q twice! It is available at a few other establishments, but served on the pork at only 2 locations (so far - and one of those is now out-of-business!).

There are TWO primary types of sauce commonly found in North Carolina - "Eastern" sauce (mostly vinegar with red pepper flakes) and "Lexington" style sauce (starts with vinegar but adds ketchup or tomato sauce and brown sugar (sometimes mollasses) with other ingredients at will).

South Carolina on the other hand has at least three primary types of sauce - "Eastern NC style", "Lexington style", and Mustard based.

Just saying...

Lake Dogs
06-19-2012, 03:02 PM
Lake Dogs - I hate to correct you, but I MUST...

Mustard sauce is a SOUTH CAROLINA ONLY thing!!! I've eaten at and reviewed 351 Q-joints and restaurants serving pork barbecue in North Carolina (for my book) and have only encountered mustard sauce served on the Q twice! It is available at a few other establishments, but served on the pork at only 2 locations (so far - and one of those is now out-of-business!).

There are TWO primary types of sauce commonly found in North Carolina - "Eastern" sauce (mostly vinegar with red pepper flakes) and "Lexington" style sauce (starts with vinegar but adds ketchup or tomato sauce and brown sugar (sometimes mollasses) with other ingredients at will).

South Carolina on the other hand has at least three primary types of sauce - "Eastern NC style", "Lexington style", and Mustard based.

Just saying...

LMAO! I stand corrected! I didn't put forth yon mustard sauce. I was, as my wife says often, "just sayin'"....

Ok, my one main sauce is a middle-of-everywhere sauce, and my 2nd sauce (which I happen to love) is a Lexington-style sauce...

deguerre
06-19-2012, 03:16 PM
For each event, are the on site judges and blind box judges distinct groups?

bbq.tom
06-19-2012, 03:24 PM
For each event, are the on site judges and blind box judges distinct groups?

Yes - there will be certain judges for on-site, others for blind-box, and still other different judges for "finals" judging. It is usually the luck of the draw as to what you will judge. You are normally told at the judge's meeting what you will be doing that day.

porkingINpublic
06-19-2012, 04:23 PM
The major benefit I found to mbn is that the onside judges will come back later and tell you the things they liked and things you could improve on. My team plans to do at least 1 mbn a year just to get that good feedback from judges.

TooSaucedToPork
06-19-2012, 04:27 PM
The major benefit I found to mbn is that the onside judges will come back later and tell you the things they liked and things you could improve on. My team plans to do at least 1 mbn a year just to get that good feedback from judges.


Or just make friends with some judges in your town from any bbq organization and have them honestly judge you...most will not turn down free grub!!!

porkingINpublic
06-19-2012, 05:42 PM
I don't think there are any qualified BBQ judges in my small town. Lol

deguerre
06-19-2012, 06:04 PM
I've been tempted to take the MBM judges class. I don't compete myself but I was wondering.

porkingINpublic
06-19-2012, 08:51 PM
There is one in Memphis soon. Killer hogs is the team being used for the class. I'd like to do it just to taste their food! I have heard you have to be like an apprentice at 3 events first...

TooSaucedToPork
06-19-2012, 10:08 PM
There is one in Memphis soon. Killer hogs is the team being used for the class. I'd like to do it just to taste their food! I have heard you have to be like an apprentice at 3 events first...

Its this Saturday. 3 people from our team are taking the class

porkingINpublic
06-19-2012, 10:47 PM
I'm sure it'll be good. Killer Hogs is a good team.

olewarthog
06-20-2012, 01:23 PM
Hey everyone, I am tring to study up on MBN, I would like to do one in the near future. I am familiar with FBA & KCBS. One question, on the blind box, does there have to be a minimum amount of portions turned in?
Thanks very much,
Doug

Since you're in FL, you might want to consider trying a Georgia BBQ Association (GBA) contest. The GBA uses comparative scoring like MBN but is blind box only. No on-site judging. The GBA also has the top 3 in each category advance to a finals round. GBA is also all pork like MBN. Instead of ribs, shoulder & whole hog, GBA does ribs, pork & pork loin. The pork category can be shoulder, butt or picnic. Pork loin may be boneless or bone in & must be a minimum 5 lbs.

Hogs Gone Wild BBQ
06-20-2012, 06:39 PM
Since you're in FL, you might want to consider trying a Georgia BBQ Association (GBA) contest. The GBA uses comparative scoring like MBN but is blind box only. No on-site judging. The GBA also has the top 3 in each category advance to a finals round. GBA is also all pork like MBN. Instead of ribs, shoulder & whole hog, GBA does ribs, pork & pork loin. The pork category can be shoulder, butt or picnic. Pork loin may be boneless or bone in & must be a minimum 5 lbs.

Yes, I'm interested in looking at some GBA competitions, also. Thanks for the suggestion.

Hogs Gone Wild BBQ
06-20-2012, 06:40 PM
I was also wondering, are pellet cookers allowed in MBN?

porkingINpublic
06-20-2012, 09:20 PM
Yep. We used a trader lil tex for shoulders

Hogs Gone Wild BBQ
06-21-2012, 11:26 AM
Thanks very much, I will be using a Stump's gravity feed, and two GMG's.

Lake Dogs
06-21-2012, 12:43 PM
You'll see quite a few Stump's in MBN. Melissa and Pete just built their new trailer about a year ago, loaded up with Stumpies...

Hogs Gone Wild BBQ
06-21-2012, 01:10 PM
Mine is a used 223 from Rob "Rub" Bagby. A nice cooker.