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Nordy
05-15-2012, 11:38 AM
Several comps have "peoples choice" Sometimes those are Friday night (usually ribs), but most seem to be on Saturday. How do you manage your cook space?

I cook on a FEC100 and a PG1000 pellet grill. I could have a rack or maybe two on my FEC while the big cuts are on but some of these PC contests are BIG and large VOLUMES are necessary...

For me, I'm primarily there to cook for the KCBS Competition, however I also want to support the contest and it's beneficiary. Do I throw on some People's choice meat as soon as I get set up and then re-heat if it's on Saturday? Do I buy a bigger smoker? (yeah right)... Like I said, I want to support the causes/competitions, however I don't want to compromise my Competition cook...

Lake Dogs
05-15-2012, 11:56 AM
I've never competed in a peoples choice in barbecue unless it was judged blind and every competitor put in the same amount of barbecue (ala. only 1 contest that I know of does this, and only 1 contest that I submit anything for peoples choice).

The reason is what I learned about peoples choice in chili cookoffs. First off know that the local team bringing all their friends will most likely win. Secondly, if there is a chance that the first-off doesnt play into it heavily, the team serving the most and hands out samples long after everyone else has run out will win. Combine #1 and #2 above and if that's not you you're highly unlikely to win, place, or show. Chili doesn't cost much, so participating in these can be fun and almost comical sometimes. BBQ isn't cheap at all. I'd hate to spend a couple of hundred of dollars on barbecue and bust my butt and turn out an award winning product only to get beat out by the local team from the VFW who brought out all their members. Mind you, if you want to do this to support them, by all means do it, make a couple of racks, hand out 15 ribs, eat a few yourself, and enjoy crowd watching. Nothing wrong with that.

DawgPhan
05-15-2012, 12:13 PM
If the following conditions are met we compete in people's choice.

Contest provides the meat.
It costs less than $25-$50 to enter. If it costs money to enter there must be a payout.
Contest handles giving out samples.
Samples must be given out blindly.
All teams turn in the same amount of meat.
Turn-in should be @ 10:30 or 11. Any later and it begins to interfere with the contest. After turn-ins I want to clean and pack.

The people's choice where the public walks from team to team to get samples is not something I am interested in doing.

I would imagine that we would do people's choice at every contest if it was run like this.

ammoore
05-15-2012, 12:15 PM
It's easy.....don't do it if you feel it will compromise the real reason you are there.

Lake Dogs summed it up....9x out of 10 that is how I've seen it go down.

Pigs on Fire
05-15-2012, 12:16 PM
Get a whistle. Stay up all night tending to your stick burner. Drink a lot of beer.

15 minutes BEFORE the time that was announced for PC to start, start blowing the whistle at every public patron, directing them to your cooksite. Blow the whistle many, many times.

Especially where the cook team(s) next to you can hear it well and make sure you concentrate on blowing that whistle and hawking the people's choice while all the rest of the teams are preparing their turn-in boxes.

dmprantz
05-15-2012, 12:22 PM
Similar to what others have said, we only do PC if it's free to enter, and the organizer provides the meat. We're there to compete in the main event, and consider PC to be a real crap shoot. We're glad to throw our hat into the ring, but that PC meat is always a second class citizen to the other meats. We don't do on-site PC either, and expect it to be blind.

Generally, I expect that when the organizer provides the meat it's all going to be approximately equal portions to all teams. I was at one competition a couple years ago where the organizer decided to distribute all the meat unevenly so that some teams got 2 butts, some 4, and some 6, depending on cooker space. There were several irregularities with that PC competition, including the refusal to hand out PC placings beyonf first.

dmp

Nordy
05-15-2012, 01:13 PM
The PC I'm considering is my local contest... and honestly people I know around here "expect" me to enter... I may be able to get a loner pit from someone local who is not cooking and go that route...

I'll probably add a few of my local buddies to the team to cook PC... while the usual team members will focus on KCBS comp meats...

Who knows... PC seems like a real PIA honestly.

That's the only way I can see it being do-able.

rooftop bbq
05-15-2012, 01:26 PM
almost every contest in california has peoples choice. Most of them dont put up any prize money but they also dont cost anything to enter, its just a way for teams to recoup some of their cost by selling their left over meat. the standard is 50/50 split for 2 dollar 2oz samples. If you have an extra meat and an extra hand you can make your meat cost back pretty easy.
We go pretty heavy on PC and have been able to off set all costs for the competitions including gas, entry fee, ingrediants and meat. We've also been able to put money aside for future events. If you have the man power I'd suggest doing it, it makes the drive home alot better if you didnt get that big walk.

Lake Dogs
05-15-2012, 01:38 PM
Get a whistle. Stay up all night tending to your stick burner. Drink a lot of beer.

15 minutes BEFORE the time that was announced for PC to start, start blowing the whistle at every public patron, directing them to your cooksite. Blow the whistle many, many times.

Especially where the cook team(s) next to you can hear it well and make sure you concentrate on blowing that whistle and hawking the people's choice while all the rest of the teams are preparing their turn-in boxes.

^^^ Funny, because in chili we use cow bells...

Fat Freddy
05-15-2012, 01:58 PM
At a contest I am doing this year we are required to do PC. It is a pork loin and if like last year a big one. To me the PC is the biggest pain in the pork butt. Seems to be nothing but a popularity contest. Not sour grapes on my end because at the 2 contests I did last year with PC I didnt deserve to win, but at both the local teams won the PC and ironically at one the team that won PC finished DAL in every regular meat category.

The reason I am dreading it this year also is because of the PC the health dept gets involved and you have to go through that mess. Last year at this event they hit my site at 11:45am so you can imagine how much of a farking mess that was.

I have decided I am going to cook the loin on Friday and reheat it Saturday for the PC at 2pm then it wont take any of my very limited cooking space for my KCBS meats.

caseydog
05-15-2012, 02:49 PM
I'm an outsider trying to understand competition BBQ. I've read other threads that indicate that spectators are a PITA, and now I'm reading that People's Choice competition is a PITA.

Are competitions at the KCBS private parties that spectators are, reluctantly, allowed to attend, as long as they shut up and stay out of the way?

I've thought about attending a big comp, but I wouldn't want to feel like a nuisance.

If part of the mission of KCBS is to promote BBQ -- what exactly does that mean? Where do spectators fit into the program? I can understand not being able to chat when you are preparing your entries, but is there any time that spectators and public relations aren't a PITA?

If competitors find it unpleasant to talk to spectators and hand out food, why not just close competitions to the public? Then you can focus 100-percent on winning and payouts, and not have to fark with the riff-raff.


CD

eggzlot
05-15-2012, 03:10 PM
Caseydog,

I think people's compliants about the PC's is that they arent set up in a fair manner. Not sour grapes, but I did PC's at a contest this year, and our location of our site was awful. We had ZERO foot traffic, no way to win. We paid $25 to enter plus we supplied our own pork plus the pans for cooking, rub, our sauces, etc. So we had a cost and pretty much no shot to win. Plus the PC's turn in's were at the same time as the KCBS turn in - total nightmare building boxes, running to judges and serving PC's from our own tent.

I know organizers use PC's to help raise money usually for a good cause, so its hard to be totally against it, just wish it was more "team friendly" especially when we are paying to enter, paying for the meat, etc.

To make it fair, PC's should be blind and the food should be handed out by the event staff at a central location at the event and people vote blindly for their favorite - especially if the PC's contest is at any time close to KCBS/main content's turn in time for the judges.

When I have done contests, unless I am working on boxing / turning in the food, I never mind people coming up, talking to us, wanting to see our pit, our booth set up, etc. For the ~2 hrs around boxing and clean up after, we like to keep to ourselves. We are at the contest usually around 24-30 hours between load in, cooking, turn in, packing up and going home. For about 4-5 of those hours (boxing and packing up) we like to be left alone. The other 20+ hours, come by to say hello!!

Nordy
05-15-2012, 03:16 PM
I'm sure some feel the way you describe, however I think most who complain about the "general public" are cooks who have had bad experiences with spectators overstepping their bounds. ie messing with/opening cookers, helping themselves to "samples" during turnins etc.

Personally I like the interaction with the "rif raff" but when its time to work... I walk off and take care of business... if the specs are offended when I walk off... too bad, I have work to do.

You do point out a very significant issue with BBQ competitions... and likely why they are not great TV draws as well... they aren't spectator friendly. The only way other than having another draw such as a "festival" with craft and other vendors to get public "buy in" is through people's choice. How to make that jive with competition cooking? Good question, that's what I'm trying to figure out.

Best case would be a blind people's choice with "leftovers" from comp meats, however the "blind" doesn't get the public interacting with the teams... thus they are "buying in" to eating some BBQ not to learning from/interacting with teams etc. They have no idea if the Q they are eating is a top 5 national team or the local VFW. They don't have anyone to "root for" at an awards ceremony... Unfortunately when it is not blind it does then become as contest of who can bring the most friends to a contest...

Bigmista
05-15-2012, 03:24 PM
I think you all (with the exception of rooftop) approaching PC from the wrong angle. If you are doing PC to win a prize, don't do it. PC works best when you are doing it to make extra money from your sales. Usually (at last here in california) you just serve your extra meat from your cooks unless yo go all out like some of us do.

I never do PC in search of a trophy but we usually end up with one. We enjoy talking to the crowds and serving them. It gives the spectators something to do and they keep coming back. Believe me if you don't get spectators out to these events, the sponsors will stop contributing and there will be far fewer contests.

Do your part, even if you only serve for an hour and run out of food. Teams with more space will pick up the slack. Support the contests and support the sport. Make it fun for the people who come out and spend their money to see us and taste some championship bbq.

SirPorkaLot
05-15-2012, 03:24 PM
I'm an outsider trying to understand competition BBQ. I've read other threads that indicate that spectators are a PITA, and now I'm reading that People's Choice competition is a PITA.

Are competitions at the KCBS private parties that spectators are, reluctantly, allowed to attend, as long as they shut up and stay out of the way?

I've thought about attending a big comp, but I wouldn't want to feel like a nuisance.

If part of the mission of KCBS is to promote BBQ -- what exactly does that mean? Where do spectators fit into the program? I can understand not being able to chat when you are preparing your entries, but is there any time that spectators and public relations aren't a PITA?

If competitors find it unpleasant to talk to spectators and hand out food, why not just close competitions to the public? Then you can focus 100-percent on winning and payouts, and not have to fark with the riff-raff.


CD

CD: The public can be a PITA at comps when the organizers open up the festival to the public at 9 or 10am, as this is the height of activity in he pressure chamber (cook site).

They are curious and come asking questions, and unless you are set up (like at MIM) where you have enough resources and room to have people manning a public area, then answering a bunch of questions while you are trying to prepare 4 meats for turn-in is not a good thing.

On the flip side though, I love to show off my craft and answer questions about it, just not Saturday morning after I have been up half (or most) of the night.

PC has it's advantages as disadvantages. I don't care for them for reasons already stated above.

Bigmista
05-15-2012, 03:29 PM
Caseydog,

I think people's compliants about the PC's is that they arent set up in a fair manner. Not sour grapes, but I did PC's at a contest this year, and our location of our site was awful. We had ZERO foot traffic, no way to win. We paid $25 to enter plus we supplied our own pork plus the pans for cooking, rub, our sauces, etc. So we had a cost and pretty much no shot to win. Plus the PC's turn in's were at the same time as the KCBS turn in - total nightmare building boxes, running to judges and serving PC's from our own tent.

I know organizers use PC's to help raise money usually for a good cause, so its hard to be totally against it, just wish it was more "team friendly" especially when we are paying to enter, paying for the meat, etc.

To make it fair, PC's should be blind and the food should be handed out by the event staff at a central location at the event and people vote blindly for their favorite - especially if the PC's contest is at any time close to KCBS/main content's turn in time for the judges.

When I have done contests, unless I am working on boxing / turning in the food, I never mind people coming up, talking to us, wanting to see our pit, our booth set up, etc. For the ~2 hrs around boxing and clean up after, we like to keep to ourselves. We are at the contest usually around 24-30 hours between load in, cooking, turn in, packing up and going home. For about 4-5 of those hours (boxing and packing up) we like to be left alone. The other 20+ hours, come by to say hello!!

Here in California, it doesn't cost extra to be in the PC contests. Perhaps, that's an issue with the promoters. We generally do a 50/50 split with the organizers and less if they supply the PC meat for us to cook. A lot of the times, the local teams win because they bring out their friends, but if you made some extra cash, do you really care? I'd rather go home with cash in my pocket than a trophy. And when I do, Mrs. Mista let's me come out and play the next time...

Fat Freddy
05-15-2012, 03:30 PM
I'm an outsider trying to understand competition BBQ. I've read other threads that indicate that spectators are a PITA, and now I'm reading that People's Choice competition is a PITA.

Are competitions at the KCBS private parties that spectators are, reluctantly, allowed to attend, as long as they shut up and stay out of the way?

I've thought about attending a big comp, but I wouldn't want to feel like a nuisance.

If part of the mission of KCBS is to promote BBQ -- what exactly does that mean? Where do spectators fit into the program? I can understand not being able to chat when you are preparing your entries, but is there any time that spectators and public relations aren't a PITA?

If competitors find it unpleasant to talk to spectators and hand out food, why not just close competitions to the public? Then you can focus 100-percent on winning and payouts, and not have to fark with the riff-raff.


CD

Fair question Caseydog and I can only speak for myself and my very limited experience. I have cooked 2 contests in my life did not win but did not embarrass myself. Both had a PC where people walked around and sampled all and voted. The contest were at 2 quite different locations and yet at both of them the "local teams" were at then entrance/exit from the event and that happened to be where you voted. Like I said at one of the contests the PC champ finished DAL in all other categories and at the other event the top 3 spots out of 66 teams were all the "local" teams. To me it makes me question the fairness.

Also the biggest stress of each competition was the PC from stuff we were not made aware of. Example at one we got the pork loins but they were frozen solid which added stress and then of course the health dept mess. If they would have showed up at even 10am I would have been fine. The other contest we were told for PC we would be cooking a certain amount which was furnished however at 9pm Friday night the organizers went around and said we need each team to cook an additional 4 butts because they did not get any last minute entries. Total of 6 butts for PC. That was stressful. I have an 18WSM a GMG and a Big Steel Keg. Cook 4 contest meats and an additional 6 butts not easy but I got it done:shocked:.

I am willing to visit with anyone at almost anytime and share my very limited knowledge but at this point in my competitive cooking I am not a fan of the PC. Now if it was blind judging and organized from top to bottom within reason I would have no issue doing the PC if I had cooker space.

So it is not the spectators to me that is a PITA but everything else about the PC.

eggzlot
05-15-2012, 03:35 PM
Bigmista -

The events I have seen out here mostly do not allow teams to sell during PC's, if you could do that, then its another ball game, it is a good way to recoup some money.

I am by far the most experienced comp cooker, I am doing comps and even a PC's for fun, no grand ideas of making big money doing it. That being said, if I am going to shell out the entry fee plus cost for the meat and all of my supplies to cook it, I'd just hope the process is fair - blind judging for People's Choice. I can only speak for myself, if I were a spectator, I'd be ok with going to a central area to taste food, but then walk the grounds to see what teams are doing.

I agree, PC's is important for the event organizers so I did it and supported it, just saying it was more money out of pocket with little chance to recoup. If the meats were supplied, if the tasting was done blindly in a centralized area, or if we could have sold our samples, those are different stories.

Fat Freddy
05-15-2012, 03:36 PM
Here in California, it doesn't cost extra to be in the PC contests. Perhaps, that's an issue with the promoters. We generally do a 50/50 split with the organizers and less if they supply the PC meat for us to cook. A lot of the times, the local teams win because they bring out their friends, but if you made some extra cash, do you really care? I'd rather go home with cash in my pocket than a trophy. And when I do, Mrs. Mista let's me come out and play the next time...

Heck Neil, I would be happy with even a trophy right now :mrgreen:

Nordy
05-15-2012, 03:47 PM
Around here I haven't seen any PCs that let you sell (Probably mainly due to health dept regulations). But they will sell "tasting kits" and some will provide meat... some don't.

So there's no real profit/recoup in it for the teams, unless you win. (just like the rest of the contest...) IF I could make a little cash on the PC... different ball game.

DawgPhan
05-15-2012, 04:05 PM
I have never seen a people's choice where you could sell your leftover comp meat to the public. That is a whole other deal. People's choice in GA is you get 2 pork butts, cook them and either hand them out or turn them in and the organizer hands them out. not money to be made other than a payout.

SirPorkaLot
05-15-2012, 04:06 PM
I think you all (with the exception of rooftop) approaching PC from the wrong angle. If you are doing PC to win a prize, don't do it. PC works best when you are doing it to make extra money from your sales. Usually (at last here in california) you just serve your extra meat from your cooks unless yo go all out like some of us do.

I never do PC in search of a trophy but we usually end up with one. We enjoy talking to the crowds and serving them. It gives the spectators something to do and they keep coming back. Believe me if you don't get spectators out to these events, the sponsors will stop contributing and there will be far fewer contests.

Do your part, even if you only serve for an hour and run out of food. Teams with more space will pick up the slack. Support the contests and support the sport. Make it fun for the people who come out and spend their money to see us and taste some championship bbq.

Spoken from a well from a BBQ vendor's point of view :biggrin1:

However some of us don't have any desire to sell BBQ, ever. We go out and spend our hard earn dollars to compete, for the sake of competing, and because we love bbq and the people in bbq.

You set up and cook for the public on a day to day basis, that is what you do (and do quite well I might add), for us smaller teams just trying to scrape by enough cash for entry fees, meat, beer, etc, it is all we can do to pull of a weekend of competing.

PC has no allure in anyway for us.
We don't covet the win, because it is a game of favorites, not bbq (last PC we entered was won by grilled ribs covered in pizza sauce), and the added work/risks with selling to the public outweighs any potential gain in our world.

Slamdunkpro
05-15-2012, 04:24 PM
Let's call it what it really is. People's Choice competitions are an attendance gimmick and that's fine. I enjoy talking to spectators but we don't have the space or (usually) the manpower to serve out of our site. Throw an extra butt in for PC with a 10:30 or 2pm turn in? Sure. Cook a butt or a bunch of ribs for a Friday night even? No.

caseydog
05-15-2012, 04:27 PM
Thanks for all the thoughtful replies.

It sounds like most of you like the idea of spectator participation and People's Choice competition, but the execution is off.

It seems to me that if organizers communicate well to spectators, you should be able to have that five or so hours of uninterrupted time to get your turn ins done. I work at a lot of high end car shows, and see people walk among million-dollar cars without touching them, and the owners love to talk about them to anyone who wants to listen. Judging is different, but still happens with spectators present.

It seems to me that organizers need to make sure there are proper boundaries in place between public time and "leave us alone" time. I have been to races and shows where people have been scolded for being where they shouldn't be, and nine times out of ten, it was because the organizers didn't make it clear where people were allowed, and not allowed to go -- and when they could be there and when they could not.

As for People's Choice, why not have people vote via the "Tip Jar" method? If you like the food, drop some coin into the tip jar at that booth. All money goes to charity. That's just one idea. There has to be a way to make PC fun for everyone, and raise money for a worthy cause.

Personally, I would think that putting PC cooking after the turn-ins are done would be a good way for stressed out competitors to unwind, drink a few beers, and cook for the fun of cooking. Kind of a "cool down lap" after the race.

Just some thoughts. Thanks again for the helpful replies.

CD

Bigmista
05-15-2012, 06:33 PM
Well we don't actually "sell". The event sells $2 tickets to the public. They can in turn give you a ticket for a 2 oz. sample. At the end of the day, you turn in your tickets and get $1 for each one. HD generally has different rules for sampling than they do for full on vending.

Pigs on Fire
05-15-2012, 08:14 PM
Casey,

I can tell you that the only PITA from the general public I have seen is on Friday nights where there is a concert in conjunction with the contest and there's 2-5k people there. Many of them end up knee-walking drunk and some end up in your cook site. We are not there to babysit and entertain drunks.

If I had a restaurant, I would love the ticket/jar voting method and the handing out of the samples at the cook site...as I would have other people to show up and handle the People's Choice duty. We don't and therefore there is no benefit to us to endure that type of People's Choice contest. It takes more people and time than you think. Just like some teams don't show up to a contest to party, they don't show up to feed the public involuntarily.

I like interacting with the public as long as they're not drunk and in my face screaming about my imaginary friends.

I actually think that contest organizers should make PC mandatory for the teams or pay a higher entry fee. It helps promote the contests and gives the public a chance to do what they are thinking they are showing up for- an all-you-can-eat BBQ buffet. But I want the contest organizers to handle it, hand it out and do blind judging of some sort if they are going to hand out prizes/cash. I don't want to do a popularity contest.

I want the public to come out to the events. I want them interacting with the teams, finding some favorite teams and even staying for awards.

SirPorkaLot
05-15-2012, 09:27 PM
Casey,

I can tell you that the only PITA from the general public I have seen is on Friday nights where there is a concert in conjunction with the contest and there's 2-5k people there. Many of them end up knee-walking drunk and some end up in your cook site. We are not there to babysit and entertain drunks.

If I had a restaurant, I would love the ticket/jar voting method and the handing out of the samples at the cook site...as I would have other people to show up and handle the People's Choice duty. We don't and therefore there is no benefit to us to endure that type of People's Choice contest. It takes more people and time than you think. Just like some teams don't show up to a contest to party, they don't show up to feed the public involuntarily.

I like interacting with the public as long as they're not drunk and in my face screaming about my imaginary friends.

I actually think that contest organizers should make PC mandatory for the teams or pay a higher entry fee. It helps promote the contests and gives the public a chance to do what they are thinking they are showing up for- an all-you-can-eat BBQ buffet. But I want the contest organizers to handle it, hand it out and do blind judging of some sort if they are going to hand out prizes/cash. I don't want to do a popularity contest.

I want the public to come out to the events. I want them interacting with the teams, finding some favorite teams and even staying for awards.

+1

What he said. :becky:

Jeffp
05-15-2012, 09:50 PM
I have to agree with RoofTop and BigMista. I don't do PC with the expectation of winning, I really do it with the intention of recouping some of my costs (usually doesnt work out that way) and more importantly, promote real BBQ and our sport to the public. These poeple who spend money to come to an event want to try BBQ, good BBQ, stuff created by people who have spent years and countless hours perfecting their craft. Most people have had it at a restaurant and think they know good BBQ however rarely does a restaurant serve great BBQ.
I cant cook enough food to provide samples all afternoon nor do I plan to, but sharing what I have made and promoting our sport is important to me. Without the public attending our events, sponsors wont be backing them and we all lose.

gooose53
05-16-2012, 11:02 AM
In the SCBA (South Carolina BBQ Assoc) we do PC at almost every event. The event almost always benefits a charity of some sort. Some contests provide the meat and some don't. It's always held on Friday nights. I don't mind doing them for the most part. I enjoy interacting with the public and explaining what it is we do. I've won a fair amount of PC contests and lost some as well but always have a good time. I understand that the money is going to a charity and that's the way you have to look at it.

paydabill
05-16-2012, 12:31 PM
Washington has a people's choice - it is Saturday after turn ins. They do it right, they provide the meat and a person to serve it to the public. It brings in a lot of people and money. I am glad to participate.

What we usually do is take our left over competition pork and use it. Since we cook 2 butts already.

Jorge
05-16-2012, 01:29 PM
Personally, I would think that putting PC cooking after the turn-ins are done would be a good way for stressed out competitors to unwind, drink a few beers, and cook for the fun of cooking. Kind of a "cool down lap" after the race.

Just some thoughts. Thanks again for the helpful replies.

CD

I appreciated the perspective, but this one really stood out to me. After taking a day or more off from work, setting up, prep, dealing with the elements, and cooking....AND then getting everything turned in after dealing with issues a lot of folks are ready for A beer before packing up to go home. Once there they have to clean up, put stuff away, catch up on things around the house...and go to work on Monday.

I've seen a lot of different ways to make PC work accross the country. What works in California may not be a good fit for Iowa, and what works in the NE may not fit in Georgia.

I think it's up to the organizer and teams of individual events to determine if there is some middle ground based on what they have to deal with. If a team just doesn't have the cooker space, or people to do it they might be willing to bring something pre cooked and turned in to a central site if it's allowed. The majority of cooks that I know will do whatever they can to support any organizer that supports them and makes the effort to meet them in the middle.

That being said....cooks are like a bunch of old widow women that will gossip and complain about ANYTHING!:heh:

G$
05-16-2012, 02:30 PM
JOKE ALERT JOKE ALERT JOKE ALERT JOKE ALERT

That being said....cooks are like a bunch of old widow women that will gossip and complain about ANYTHING!:heh:

Wow Jorge, I can not believe the BOD would have a position like that. :caked:

Seriously though, the last thing I want/can do after brisket turn in is prep more and serve meat.

I also think "Peoples Choice" really needs to be used consistently in discussions like this. "Split proceed Taste Tickets" are not the same as "PC voting for awards". I sometimes do the former and would never do the latter unless the raw materials were provided.

On a personal level, the more I do this, the less rewarding (and feasible) the PC/Taste tickets usually are.

Jorge
05-16-2012, 02:41 PM
It was nice to just be able to be a cook for a change:heh: Zinger accepted:mrgreen:

JOKE ALERT JOKE ALERT JOKE ALERT JOKE ALERT



Wow Jorge, I can not believe the BOD would have a position like that. :caked:

Seriously though, the last thing I want/can do after brisket turn in is prep more and serve meat.

I also think "Peoples Choice" really needs to be used consistently in discussions like this. "Split proceed Taste Tickets" are not the same as "PC voting for awards". I sometimes do the former and would never do the latter unless the raw materials were provided.

On a personal level, the more I do this, the less rewarding (and feasible) the PC/Taste tickets usually are.

Nordy
05-16-2012, 03:16 PM
One comp here asks for a "donation" of leftover comp meat which they then sell to the general public for the charity... seems reasonable, BUT it does cost me my leftovers which my butcher, office staff, friends, and many others enjoy...

I like the "split the ticket proceeds" option...

MrsMista
05-16-2012, 05:16 PM
We did one people's choice event where if you wanted to vote you picked up a ballot and turned it in. The teams never knew you were voting for them. One guy said earlier he has not desire to sell bbq he just wants to compete. I'm all for that if you can afford it. The reason I usually give into the people's choice contest it's a way to promote our catering business. I could give two hoots if they ever come to the market and buy something to eat. And in the bbq business winning a trophy in any category always impresses your potential clientele.

I see bbq businesses that have won one local competition and market that badge of honor into the ground. Neil competes because he loves bbq, camaraderie, and feeding people. I don't fuss about it much anymore because it keeps him happy.

CivilWarBBQ
05-16-2012, 09:49 PM
Doing People's Choice is about supporting the organizer. Hopefully they make it as painless and inexpensive as possible by charging no entry fee, supplying raw meat, allowing pre-cooked & reheated meat, etc.

If PC is structured in a way that is doable for us, we'll help out. If not (i.e. it is looked at as a "real" contest, we opt out). Frankly PC is as big a bother for organizers as it is for teams, but it's the best answer that anyone has come up with to the question the public always asks: "Where do I get BBQ at this BBQ festival?"

The bottom line: Organizers need the public to hold contests and we need those contests, so PC is a sometimes a neccessary evil.

roksmith
05-17-2012, 06:12 AM
From our organizer's committee, I can say that we see it as a 3 fold opportunity.
1. The public loves to taste the bbq and interact with the competitors.
2. It provides an income to the contest by collecting money from the public without charging an entrance fee.
3. It provides the teams who may not have had a great weekend to make a few bucks.

Our PC contest does onsite sampling because the public prefers it that way.
It may not provide the most fair competition between teams, but that's what the KCBS portion of the event provides. The onsite sampling seems to bring a little MBN flavor into the contest..with the little dog and pony show.

We also provide the meat at no cost to the contestants.
This makes it not really cost the competitors much beyond a little rack space and some time.

We also do provide cash prizes to (I believe) the top 3 or 4 teams.
That provides a little more incentive to the teams to compete providing our public with more opportunities to sample and interact.

It works for us pretty well..the public is happy, the contest make a few extra bucks and the teams that like to interact with the public has a chance to make a few bucks.
Do hometown folks have an advantage? Sure. In the 3 years we've run with this format, 2 local teams have won, but the second year it was a traveling team..so it can be done.

Robert
05-17-2012, 09:10 AM
Here is the way that I view people's choice in the heartland (Missouri, Oklahoma, Kansas and Arkansas). Most, not all, are hosting a cook-off as a part of some charity, whether it be the chamber of commerce, rotary, elks, etc. Usually the meat is donated for the PC. They hope to make money from the $5 sampler kit they sell to the public. Sometimes, the only money they raise for the charity is from those kit sales. Any of you who have ever ran a cook-off know the expense that goes in. If they make very little for the charity from the cook-off, the next committe meeting might be on the lines of: Let's ditch this and have a car wash! And cook-off for next year is no longer.

So, my advice is this and it is something that we have followed for years. Give without expectation of getting back. Most, not all, surely have room for one extra butt or brisket. It doesn't take long to season and we do nothing special to that meat. We have a large cooker and always volunteer to cook extra and usually do, but only after others have had their chance to volunteer. Oh, and we have never won a PC anywhere, even in our home town. We just want the cook-off to be successful and raise money for the charity and hope they host again next year. The only caveat that we have is they must hand out the samples.

Perhaps if you look at the people's choice situation from this perspective, you will see where you are the benefactor from just a little effort and you get to go back to that town and cook again next year.

Robert

Fat Freddy
05-17-2012, 11:00 AM
Kinda ironic that in the mail moments ago I got a thing for signing up for a contest. In this mailing PC was mentioned here is the last sentence of the paragraph "We will be notifying each team as to what quantities of meat the will be receiving" Then later in the rules it says that for PC they would like all chicken pulled and all pork butt(S) pulled. This was the contest that had me do 6 pork butts for PC last year.

So only using this contest, no mention of charity for PC, unknown amount of meat I will have to cook, and I will have to pull chicken before serving it to public.:wacko:

I think it is safe to say that i will not be doing this PC this year if I can get out of it.

cpw
05-17-2012, 11:06 AM
In all of the South Carolina BBQ sanctioned events that I've competed in, each team is given a case of butts (usually 8 ) to cook for both the competition and people's choice. The team decides what they want to do with the meat in terms of rub, injection, etc, but they also have their choice of 8 butts to cook for competition. Whatever doesn't get turned in for judging gets put into warming trays for public consumption. Normally, there's a $5 or $10 ticket charge, but it's basically all you can eat bbq for the public who come to the event, served by event volunteers. Some comps haven't had a peoples choice award to go with the public sampling, and some have.

rooftop bbq
05-17-2012, 12:17 PM
These were the lines for us and Big Mista this past weekend. If you show these to a potential sponsor (for the event or your team) you will defiantly get their attention.
https://fbcdn-sphotos-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/464821_386941981345117_111418092230842_1042881_197 0845075_o.jpg

Pigs on Fire
05-17-2012, 02:21 PM
That smog is kickin'.

ThomEmery
05-17-2012, 02:33 PM
It was overcast along the shore that morning
we were right at the Queen Mary in Long Beach
heavy smog no longer happens like that

SmokinOkie
05-17-2012, 02:58 PM
All great comments. First an foremost, I'm there to compete, not feed the public. IF (and it's a big IF) it meets the requirements I see above, then I'll contribute. What we do, since we have enough room is I bring someone alone specifically to do just the PC so that it doesn't detract from our normal process.

I know the "local" push well. We've won locally and it means a lot for street cred. I actually brought about 10 of the kids and their friends along. It was one of those "come by the site and eat our food". I told the kids any $$$ from PC they got. They won it that year.